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General Chat Thread, Wedding Photography in General; Hi All! Im "considering"....using the term very loosly here, taking up photography as a keen interest, and maybe doing some ...
  1. #1
    mmoseley's Avatar
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    Wedding Photography

    Hi All!

    Im "considering"....using the term very loosly here, taking up photography as a keen interest, and maybe doing some wedding photography, as i work Mon-Fri....looks like the only day i would be able to do is a Sat or Sun,

    Does anybody know of or have gotten into this sort of business? Im keen to get an idea of it all,

    I recently went a a very good friends wedding and I took my camera and they were very impressed by the shots i produced, They were the ones that really got the idea going in my head,

    Am I day dreaming or could this be done?

    Im not sure.......

    Be blunt lol

  2. #2

    webman's Avatar
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    Just make sure you get insurance. A wedding is a one-time opportunity for photos, and if for whatever reason something happens, you could be left open for legal action.

    And don't do this: YouTube - Wedding Bloopers - Photographer falls into Fountain in classic Wedding Blooper

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    DaveMurphy's Avatar
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    Have a spare camera and battery just incase something happens! also might be best if theres two of you - different angle shots!

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    localzuk's Avatar
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    Done a couple of weddings and would have the following advice:

    1. Make sure you have spares of everything. If you break your camera, you've ruined the photography for the day.
    2. Make sure you have insurance
    3. Be bossy. Most wedding guests expect the cameraman to be a bossy little sod, so be so - otherwise you'll miss out on some of the classic shots.
    4. Plan. Make sure you have an idea of what you wish to get before you start - but don't be afraid to just take extra shots, some of the best wedding shots turn out from random 'oh, that looks nice' moments. But also remember that most couples are going to want the traditional shots - the couple outside the church, the couple cutting the cake, etc...
    5. Agree things like pricing beforehand, else it can get messy.
    Last edited by localzuk; 31st July 2010 at 05:10 PM.

  5. Thanks to localzuk from:

    mmoseley (1st August 2010)

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    Have a look at Phototuts: Contemporary Wedding Photography.

    They have great tutorials if you want to get yourself up to scratch.

    I've been thinking about going down this road part time but need to improve my technique.

    Oh and always shoot in RAW!

  7. 3 Thanks to Iosoma:

    john (31st July 2010), localzuk (31st July 2010), mmoseley (1st August 2010)

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    localzuk's Avatar
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    Some very good tips there.

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    I've done a couple of weddings and agree with all of the above. The best way i've found of doing things is to have spares of everything and someone to follow you around to help you carry them.

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    mmoseley's Avatar
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    Hey Guys,

    Thanks for all your advise, It has not gone un-heard!....Ive asked a few of my friends who are couples if I can try my skills out on them first and see how I get on, before making any serious decisions,

    1/2 hour of their time, and a free shoot cant be bad!

    Cheers and look forward to reading that web link!

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    beeswax's Avatar
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    Use a Hasselblad (or similar) with a waist-level viewer, and hold the camera at waist level once focused as this just about evens out perspective. Use a fill-in flash. Don't go down the digital route, use film and locate a professional lab to process the stuff, though a digital SLR would be handy for some informal stuff as people are beginning to relax after the ceremony. Introduce yourself to the best man and get him to round up the various family groups as and when you require them. You can't always get all the shots you need at the church/registry office, so if there's a park nearby, or the reception is at a decent hotel with grounds do the bulk of your work there. And this being England there's always a chance of rain, so check out where the reception is being held beforehand, if you can. Don't attempt more than two weddings in a day, one morning, one afternoon, with plenty of time between them; the levels of concentration will leave you drained.

    Oh yes - you'll absolutely carp yourself. I don't want to put you off, but you must expect this.
    I used to get my pictures back from the lab on a Monday, and found that I couldn't sleep much on the Sunday night before.
    Last edited by beeswax; 2nd August 2010 at 07:54 AM.

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    Double up on everything! One of the first weddings I did I slipped and fell over just before the ceremony began smashing the flash gun from my camera. Made shots inside the church very tricky.

    Get in touch with some local photographers and see if you can assist them. I've been out on quite a few weddings with some excellent photographers and the amount I learnt was just unbelievable. Having said that, make sure it's someone you get on with and that they shoot they way you want to learn. There is a massive difference between a traditional stand in a line and grin photographer to a reportage photographer.

    Don't be bossy. I'm sorry but there is just no need. Yes when you are doing the one massive group shot then you will need to make sure everyone can hear you but do it with a sense of humour and people will react much better to it. When it comes to finding people for smaller groups then use the bestman/ushers/bridesmaids to find them, that is there job.

    Dress smartly, act professionally and try and enjoy the day. The best shots you get are when you and the people you are taking photos of are both relaxed, I know this might sound impossible but if you have done your homework and been out on a few shoots with other togs you will be fine.

    What camera and lenses are you using?

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    localzuk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beeswax View Post
    Use a Hasselblad (or similar) with a waist-level viewer, and hold the camera at waist level once focused as this just about evens out perspective. Use a fill-in flash. Don't go down the digital route, use film and locate a professional lab to process the stuff, though a digital SLR would be handy for some informal stuff as people are beginning to relax after the ceremony.
    Disagree that this is a hard and fast 'rule'. Many wedding photographers now make use of full-frame DSLRs such as the Canon EOS 5D (not to mention that they're also used for filming due to the high resolution). Sure, a decade ago, I'd be agreeing with you but now? With 20MP and greater cameras? Digital offers a level of flexibility to the photographer without the extra cost that film cameras come with.

    Most processing labs now use digital printing, so don't use the old methods of producing the end photos (ie. passing light through a negative in an enlarger, meaning that the end print comes out with the grain of the original negative), instead films are mostly scanned in and processed as a digital image, so the end result's 'grain' is actually down to the resolution of the scanner, and the quality of the printer. Good luck finding an affordable lab which still does things the 'old' way.

    Also, take into account that switching from a DSLR to a medium format film camera is a big change, and requires much practice in order to get a feel for the different technology.

    There are other differences too, such as there being a limit on how many shots you'll be able to take with film - you're limited by your rolls of film. With digital, you can take as many as you desire, as long as you have space on your memory cards. Not to mention the flexibility you have with regards to the ISO of the image - light level changed? You simply change the ISO setting on the camera and carry on. With film you have to switch the film.

    However, the big disadvantage of using digital could be the extra time it'll take you to work with the RAW files once you're back on your computer. Whatever you do, don't shoot in plain JPEG - you'll be asking for trouble if you do!

    Whichever format you choose to use, make sure you get plenty of practice before delving into a paid job.

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    IanT's Avatar
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    I'm getting married next year and I will be looking for a Wedding Photographer soonish

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    Yeah - echoing everything that's been said so far (except also the film thing and even the Hassy thing [expensive!])

    If you're toying with the idea, I like that you're going to experiment on some couple friends first. As has been mentioned, keep in mind that it's a totally different ballgame from point-and-shoot operations. They're stressful, often chaotic and have the hopes of the couple riding on them.

    Can be awesome fun though - if you manage to engage your subjects they'll have fun. Just go into it knowing EXACTLY what the couple is expecting and EXACTLY what you'll be delivering. Having a "shot list" can help immensely.

    Also remember that couples are most likely going to want to blow up their favourite shots to quite large sizes so make sure you can do stuff with decent focus and enlarge up to maybe A4 - I've not seen too many A3 requests yet but I'm sure they exist.

    What camera/lens?

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    36Degrees's Avatar
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    I was reading through this book the other day, as I am looking at getting a much better camera, and there were quite a few tips about wedding photography - Digital Photography Book

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    PeteM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by localzuk View Post
    Done a couple of weddings and would have the following advice:

    1. Make sure you have spares of everything. If you break your camera, you've ruined the photography for the day.
    2. Make sure you have insurance
    3. Be bossy. Most wedding guests expect the cameraman to be a bossy little sod, so be so - otherwise you'll miss out on some of the classic shots.
    4. Plan. Make sure you have an idea of what you wish to get before you start - but don't be afraid to just take extra shots, some of the best wedding shots turn out from random 'oh, that looks nice' moments. But also remember that most couples are going to want the traditional shots - the couple outside the church, the couple cutting the cake, etc...
    5. Agree things like pricing beforehand, else it can get messy.
    Good points-instead of being bossy, wouldn't assertive with a sprinkling of humour thrown in be a better way. No-ones gonna smile naturally if they're getting bossed to death.

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