If you were wondering why Flash Player is missing from Ninite...

Source: The Register

Ninite offers an installer that downloads the latest version of Flash from Adobe's own website (which is entirely different from unlicensed redistribution) and performs a silent install free of the unwanted additional software that Adobe pushes onto its users in the Flash update - such as the Ask toolbar or a trial version of McAfee Antivirus.

Adobe's solution to the security problem is decidedly half-arsed: the software giant's updater, which kicks into life when it notices the installed version of Flash is out of date, is a bug-ridden example of the unfathomable number of methods by which an application can crash. It fails to apply the upgrades and security fixes required on far too many occasions. This is assuming the PC is running a version of Flash that can update itself.

The alternative – a manual download – is something most users don't even know how to do. Even if they did, the majority can't be bothered. For those who do know enough to download the updates for Flash manually, Adobe attempts to foist upon them a trial version of McAfee Antivirus! This merely makes the whole Ninite situation more galling.

It is demeaning that Adobe should resort to attempting to bamboozle users with trial installer nagware in the pursuit of a few more coppers. It is downright vindictive to demand that third parties cease providing unified tools that augment the security of the internet by cleaning up the mess they made in the first place by shipping software as insecure as Flash.

Let me preempt the argument that Ninite is somehow "insecure because it's not directly from Adobe". First off, as I stressed above, Ninite's installer downloads the files directly from Adobe. Secondly, the man behind Ninite – Sascha Kuzins – is a good guy. At this point, given that the net result of Adobe's actions regarding Ninite is a less secure internet, I find Kuzins far more trustworthy than Adobe.