+ Post New Thread
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 31
Wireless Networks Thread, Microsoft or Cisco certification?????? in Technical; ...
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    4
    Thank Post
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Microsoft or Cisco certification??????

    Hi, I am I have just completed my graduation and want to try my luck in the field of IT. Can some body tell me whether Microsoft or Cisco certificates will be beneficial for a beginner like me in today’s Job scenario?

  2. #2

    mattx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    9,240
    Thank Post
    1,058
    Thanked 1,068 Times in 625 Posts
    Rep Power
    740
    Quote Originally Posted by keira View Post
    Hi, I am I have just completed my graduation and want to try my luck in the field of IT. Can some body tell me whether Microsoft or Cisco certificates will be beneficial for a beginner like me in today’s Job scenario?
    In my opinion no. Hands on experience is better than waving bits of paper in front of people. Providing real world examples of where you have solved a problem / implemented a project and explaining the process in how you did it holds much more value. Someone may have all the bits of paper in the world which shows they can cram and give answers to problems in which they have revised for. Stick them in a real world situation with users / staff on their back and they will most probably crumble. Problem is 'managers' tend to like CVs of people with these bits of paper as they themselves are normally failed ex IT workers of some sort. You also have these types of people interviewing who again have had no real training or experience in how to interview - hence you end up with morons in some places of position who have no common sense and who are useless at everything...............Just like me in fact.
    Get on e-bay, buy yourself a second hand server, get a cheap workstation - install Server 2008 / Nix / Samba or whatever, break it, then fix it, then learn.
    Last edited by mattx; 28th July 2010 at 08:28 AM.

  3. 2 Thanks to mattx:

    bossman (28th July 2010), mac_shinobi (28th July 2010)

  4. #3

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    2,168
    Thank Post
    98
    Thanked 319 Times in 261 Posts
    Blog Entries
    4
    Rep Power
    113
    Quote Originally Posted by mattx View Post
    In my opinion no. Hands on experience is better than waving bits of paper in front of people.
    Better still is having both, but experience needs to come before qualifications and you need to be looking at them for the right reason, and with the right approach. Just cramming for the exam not only will harm you in future when it transpires that you don't know what you should, it also devalues the qualifications and all who actually approach them to learn rather than cram.

    Problem is 'managers' tend to like CVs of people with these bits of paper as they themselves are normally failed ex IT workers of some sort.
    Again this is why you need the knowledge to back up your qualifications, not a list of exam answers stuck in your head. If you do have both the knowledge, and the qualification, you will be well-placed.

  5. Thanks to jamesb from:

    Dos_Box (29th July 2010)

  6. #4

    mattx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    9,240
    Thank Post
    1,058
    Thanked 1,068 Times in 625 Posts
    Rep Power
    740
    Quote Originally Posted by jamesb View Post
    Better still is having both, but experience needs to come before qualifications and you need to be looking at them for the right reason, and with the right approach. Just cramming for the exam not only will harm you in future when it transpires that you don't know what you should, it also devalues the qualifications and all who actually approach them to learn rather than cram.



    Again this is why you need the knowledge to back up your qualifications, not a list of exam answers stuck in your head. If you do have both the knowledge, and the qualification, you will be well-placed.
    I would rather stick pins in my eyes that go through the Money Making MS / Cisco Exams. I'm too old for them now anyway and generally hate anything IT wise out of work. Much more important things in life than bleeding boring ICT and all the crap it entails.

    I'm off for some physiotherapy then into the school for bleeding boring ICT work...... /Rant Over
    Last edited by mattx; 28th July 2010 at 08:34 AM.

  7. #5

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Bathurst
    Posts
    40
    Thank Post
    0
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
    Rep Power
    11
    From the other side of the fence- I'm the manager, and I'm not a failed IT guy, and I'm a highly qualified IT guy and trainer. When I'm interveiwing candidates I'm looking for experience and some qualifications.

    I want the guy/girl who has the drive to get some qualifications of his/her own and some experience. They're the ones that are keen to learn, are also the easiest to train.

    I would prefer the guy with a CCENT, or Network+, or the equivalent from Juniper or HP or something from M$ than the guy who believes he's good enough with any further learning.

    In this game if you're not prepared to update your skills you might as well get out and go and direct traffic.

    My advice, find something you're interested in learning about, it doesn't really matter if it's Cisco, Microsoft, HP, VMware or CompTIA, show your prospective employer you're keen to learn. Get some old hardware and pull it apart/rebuild it and learn some practical skills. Find someone to give you work experience and get some references from them.

    Show any prospective employer you have the basic knowledge to start a job, and you know where to look for more info. That's the sort of candidate employers are looking for.

    On your journey collect more skills and move up the ladder.

    Over the years I've collected qualifications from Dell, Apple, Microsoft, VMWare and Cisco. I have also studied and received qualifications that were not a job requirement in Education and Training, Business Management, Project Management, as well as my original qualifications in Electrical Engineering/Industrial Computing and Telecommunication.

    I'm not an exam junkie, I simply took each opportunity to learn a new skill when a job situation required it.

    Today I'm well paid, and run a department with a team of 3.5 and a budget of over $1m, and the responsibility for the design, installation and management of all the IT infrastruture in the school, and also all the teacher IT training. Anybody with a bit of go in them could do it too.
    Last edited by garrya100; 28th July 2010 at 01:15 PM.

  8. #6

    mattx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    9,240
    Thank Post
    1,058
    Thanked 1,068 Times in 625 Posts
    Rep Power
    740

    Sounds like

    On your journey collect more skills and move up the ladder.
    Sounds like you have taken some management 'buzzword / phrases' exams too !!

  9. #7
    jamesfed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Reading
    Posts
    2,202
    Thank Post
    137
    Thanked 342 Times in 289 Posts
    Rep Power
    86
    Like alot of people have already said experiance should come first and then qulifications.
    Schools are a great place to start out (IMO) as they usaly use a wide variety of hardware/software so you can get familiar with as much as possible as fast as possible.
    Once you are happy and settled in start thinking about personal development along the lines of certifications (make sure however there is provision for this in your contract) - start with something like a MCTS in Windows 7 and then move into whatever intrests you in servers.

    As mattx said - build your own testing server, something with a AMD Dual Core (Athlon with Hardware Virtulisation) a low cost case/motherboard and 8GB of RAM should be more than enough to run pretty much any server application - this will help you immensley in learning how servers truely work.

  10. #8
    cookie_monster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Derbyshire
    Posts
    4,201
    Thank Post
    392
    Thanked 278 Times in 239 Posts
    Rep Power
    74
    I agree with the above you need practical experience, as already stated schools are a great place to start as you'll get a crack at everything.
    I would say though from experience if you're applying for jobs in larger companies NOT having certs can mean that you miss out in the paper sift, I've been told on many occasions that if HR are shortlisting and they've been told MCSA/Cisco etc and you don't have it they'll put you in the bin without reading on. I'll be honest I've had more luck getting interviews sice having an MCSA, before that my 9 years practical networking skills on a range of systems didn't seem to get me a look in. Getting a couple of MCP exams desktop etc really isn't difficult, I'd aim for a low level job for experience then get a couple of them under your belt.

  11. #9
    bio
    bio is offline
    bio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    netherlands
    Posts
    520
    Thank Post
    16
    Thanked 130 Times in 102 Posts
    Rep Power
    37
    I also agree that one needs to have both. Hands-on experience and a CV with certifications on them. In the netherlands you will not get interview if you do not have any certifications. I participated on a IT certification board for many years now. I normally suggest to following path for newly trainees : A+ , Network+, ITIL, MSCA, CCNA, MCITP, PRINCE2....
    Its a long path that might take you a year or 2 but you'll have a solid base to start of (with good knowledge) in IT business.

    bio...

  12. #10
    RobMongoose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Tyne & Wear, UK
    Posts
    36
    Thank Post
    3
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    Blog Entries
    1
    Rep Power
    9
    Find out if your university has any affiliation with a testing centre. I was lucky while I was at uni as mine had an MS testing centre and a Cisco academy so students and graduates could take the tests at a discounted price. Yes, experience is more important, but having a few certs definately can't hurt!

  13. #11
    gshaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    2,656
    Thank Post
    164
    Thanked 220 Times in 203 Posts
    Rep Power
    67
    Definitely you need the hands-on experience as problem solving, designing a system to fit a need and the other "soft" skills don't come through certificates. I've gone through a lot of applications for IT Technicians and interviewed quite a few at work and the amount of highly qualified people on paper doesn't always match up to their results on a technical test or basic practical task

    Doesn't hurt to do the cert in the background (self study and pay £80 for the exam won't cost the earth either) once you're getting the day-to-day experience or if you need to learn a particular product for a project e.g. updating your knowledge for a new version of Exchange etc but to do it as the sole method of getting a job probably isn't the best way imo

  14. #12
    jsnetman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    887
    Thank Post
    23
    Thanked 134 Times in 126 Posts
    Rep Power
    40
    I'm too old for them now anyway and generally hate anything IT wise out of work
    I'm 50 this year and just passed my first MS cert and thoroughly enjoyed it, it's not really that expensive, £30 for the book and £88 for the test and you get a 15% off voucher. But to answer the post I have to agree that experience far outweighs the paper quals, it has been known for people to do these certs simply on memory and will be exposed if employed only on the basis of those certs. They are very handy to have on your CV though.

  15. #13

    nephilim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Dunstable
    Posts
    11,935
    Thank Post
    1,628
    Thanked 1,898 Times in 1,410 Posts
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    429
    Experience + certifications + knowledge to use certifications = ideal.

    Experience should come first though.

  16. #14

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    17
    Thank Post
    1
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by mattx View Post
    In my opinion no. Hands on experience is better than waving bits of paper in front of people. Providing real world examples of where you have solved a problem / implemented a project and explaining the process in how you did it holds much more value. Someone may have all the bits of paper in the world which shows they can cram and give answers to problems in which they have revised for. Stick them in a real world situation with users / staff on their back and they will most probably crumble. Problem is 'managers' tend to like CVs of people with these bits of paper as they themselves are normally failed ex IT workers of some sort. You also have these types of people interviewing who again have had no real training or experience in how to interview - hence you end up with morons in some places of position who have no common sense and who are useless at everything...............Just like me in fact.
    Get on e-bay, buy yourself a second hand server, get a cheap workstation - install Server 2008 / Nix / Samba or whatever, break it, then fix it, then learn.
    If you'd done the ccna you'd know how to route two different networks.

    With regards to certs, most are useless. I did the comptia a+ and don't bother putting it on my cv. The ccna on the other hand was much much harder, and the ccnp even more so. The great thing about the Cisco stuff is that it teaches a lot of general networking concepts and not just Cisco specific stuff. Some of the terminology is slightly different but that's about it. The exams are very hard. For example, they give you a network simulator and will ask you to find x amount of faults without any clues. It could be an interface with a broadcast address set or a mismatched duplex/speed setting etc. They will also disable certain commands to make it harder.

    If I had to back to the beginning of my career I would start with the CCNA and then possibly the CCNP. This will help get your foot in the door. For everything else I just read the docs/buy a book or do a short training course.

  17. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    blackpool
    Posts
    5
    Thank Post
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    If you can pass the CCNA then the microsoft exams seem easy compared.

SHARE:
+ Post New Thread
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Certification
    By jamiess in forum General Chat
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 13th April 2010, 01:36 PM
  2. [Joke] Certification
    By somabc in forum Jokes/Interweb Things
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 18th February 2010, 05:50 PM
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12th November 2009, 12:02 PM
  4. Microsoft, Cisco or Comptia - What are the Pros and Cons?
    By eddiebaby in forum Courses and Training
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 3rd May 2007, 06:22 PM
  5. Certification
    By OverWorked in forum General Chat
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 1st September 2005, 10:10 PM

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •