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Wireless Networks Thread, Proper network cabling in Technical; Can anyone point me to an internet based resource that outlines the proper way to run network cables - as ...
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    garethedmondson's Avatar
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    Proper network cabling

    Can anyone point me to an internet based resource that outlines the proper way to run network cables - as in industry standard.

    I was under the impression that you wired from patch panel to patch panel and then use patch /drop leads down into the switches. Is this correct?

    Many thanks

    Gareth

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    old_fogey's Avatar
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    Smile Proper cabling

    Try this document link, it's nice and simply written

    http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/pls/porta...ocs/1/9560.PDF

    I hope is helps

    Any questions let me know, I have worked for many large corporations installing data cabling, including fibre etc.

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    garethedmondson (17th December 2008)

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    garethedmondson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by old_fogey View Post
    Try this document link, it's nice and simply written

    http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/pls/porta...ocs/1/9560.PDF

    I hope is helps

    Any questions let me know, I have worked for many large corporations installing data cabling, including fibre etc.
    Great document. PLenty for me to wor with. Also found this website:

    Network Cabling Standards Guide, By Siemon

    Gareth

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    Michael's Avatar
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    Generally speaking, one end of the cable is patched into a face plate and the other end a patch panel.

    From the face plate you can connect a patch lead and then this goes directly into a computer. From the patch panel you have another patch lead, which then goes into a switch. It's also common practice to have different colour cables - especially for servers, network printers and access points (for example), to allow you or an network manager to manage and easily identify problems amongst all the spaghetti in your cabinet.

    Switches are joined together normally with a single cable and this then forms your network. Now if you have a very large network (like many secondary schools), you may have several network cabinets in several locations. In this situation you may typically have a core switch, (in a central location), which all other switches plug into. This can be done using network cable or fibre, if the distance exceeds 100 metres.
    There's absolutely no point patching this into a patch panel and then into a switch. If the cable used has a straight run it will minimise faults.

    All cables in rooms should be installed within trunking and shouldn't (as a general rule) run parallel close with power cables over long distances, otherwise this could cause interference.

    Hope this helps!
    Last edited by Michael; 17th December 2008 at 11:51 PM.

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    garethedmondson (17th December 2008)

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    garethedmondson's Avatar
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    Yes this does help.

    In one of the departments it has been wired like this..

    1. Fibre from central cabinet (GBIC module)to the department.
    2. Arrives in department into switch (into the GBIC module)
    3. From switch - patch cables run from ports 1-8 into face plates on the wall which in turn run to face plates in the rooms.
    4. Face plates in rooms run to computer NICS

    Opinion?

    GJE

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    Michael's Avatar
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    That's exactly how it should be done

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    garethedmondson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael View Post
    That's exactly how it should be done
    So there is no need for a patch panel as outlined in the various documents on cabling which outline backbone infrastructure.

    Gareth

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    Michael's Avatar
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    From switch - patch cables run from ports 1-8 into face plates on the wall which in turn run to face plates in the rooms.
    The only thing I would say, is it is possible to have a cable coming from a face plate in a classroom and go directly into a switch, without going through a patch panel. The patch panel is there primarily for ease of management. You can colour code or indeed connect cables into different switches (for whatever reason). Switches in principle all do the same thing, but some are manageable and come with all kinds of wonderful features to make managing and operating a network easier.

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    garethedmondson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael View Post
    The only thing I would say, is it is possible to have a cable coming from a face plate in a classroom and go directly into a switch, without going through a patch panel. The patch panel is there primarily for ease of management. You can colour code or indeed connect cables into different switches (for whatever reason). Switches in principle all do the same thing, but some are manageable and come with all kinds of wonderful features to make managing and operating a network easier.
    The wiring it a tidy job and all the cables from the wall plates ar hidden. I just don't like the loose switch and the cables coming into it. I like the tidyness of a cabinet.

    But like I said - the work looks okay and seems to be working.

    Maybe I have OCD regarding how the network should look LOL.

    Gareth

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael View Post
    Switches are joined together normally with a single cable
    Although it's probably worth pointing out that lots of switches these days support port aggregation, letting you smoosh together 4 or so ports into one. Handy if you can't quite afford 10Gbit fibre but need more bandwidth that 1GBit will give you.

    --
    David Hicks

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    localzuk's Avatar
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    All cables hitting cabinets should be terminate in patch panels, and then patch leads used - patch panels aren't there primarily for ease of management. The reasons for doing this is very simple:

    If it's fibre - the bit in the cabinet is where it is most likely going to get damaged if a run ever does. It's a lot cheaper to replace a fibre patch lead than it is to re-terminate or fix a broken connector terminated fibre run! Also, if you have a re-fit, and things need repatching in some other way (we did it here, involving moving the core to another area, and the patch panels allowed us to patch the existing fibre through to the new core with barely any hassle).

    If it's cat5/cat6 - you may need to repatch things at some point. Installation cable is solid core, so is liable to breaking if moved. A patch lead is cheap, has a stranded core and is easy to move around, so less liable to breaking if moved.

    If you don't use patch panels for copper, your system won't be Cat5/Cat6 certifiable.

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    Quote Originally Posted by garethedmondson View Post
    Yes this does help.

    In one of the departments it has been wired like this..

    1. Fibre from central cabinet (GBIC module)to the department.
    2. Arrives in department into switch (into the GBIC module)
    3. From switch - patch cables run from ports 1-8 into face plates on the wall which in turn run to face plates in the rooms.
    4. Face plates in rooms run to computer NICS

    Opinion?

    GJE
    Your missing some fibre patch panels in there.

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    plexer's Avatar
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    The only thing I would say, is it is possible to have a cable coming from a face plate in a classroom and go directly into a switch, without going through a patch panel.
    I would disagree on that point whilst it is technically possible it isn't ideal and repatching is a nightmare.

    Your structured cabling copper or fibre should terminate at a suitable patch panel in each cabinet.

    Everything is the plugged in using patch leads fibre or copper to the relevant ports.

    It sounds like you are saying that rather than use a patch panel in the cab they've used outlet faceplates instead sort of a poor mans patch panel.

    The whole point of the patch panel is to get the port density in the cab.

    Ben

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    Michael's Avatar
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    The wiring it a tidy job and all the cables from the wall plates ar hidden. I just don't like the loose switch and the cables coming into it. I like the tidyness of a cabinet.
    The switch shouldn't be lose. I presume it's a standard 19" rack you're using? The switch should have small L shaped brackets either end and screwed to the rack itself, along with the patch panel. You can also buy cable management to keep patch cables tidy.

    Although it's probably worth pointing out that lots of switches these days support port aggregation, letting you smoosh together 4 or so ports into one. Handy if you can't quite afford 10Gbit fibre but need more bandwidth that 1GBit will give you.
    Yes very true I haven't looked at the price of 10Gbps for a while, but gigabit is relatively cheap these days.

    All cables hitting cabinets should be terminate in patch panels, and then patch leads used - patch panels aren't there primarily for ease of management.
    Well every single patch panel I have allows you to label the ports, so they match the face plate at the other end. Patch cables can also be colour coded to further increase manageability. You are right however, it's also much easier moving a 20cm patch cable rather than the actual cable coming out of a wall and into a cabinet.

    As for patching fibre, I've mostly seen direct runs switch to switch. There really is little need as you wouldn't/shouldn't be moving it regularly. When Birmingham rolled out fibre internet connections to every school, they did patch the fibre. I suppose there's no right or wrong answer here and can save anywhere between £50 to £100 for a fibre patch panel. I suppose if you're having a large network installation, it is quite significant and is an after thought.

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    plexer's Avatar
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    So what do you do with the extra fibre cores?

    Ours have at least 4 core fibres run everywhere and the new cab interconnects have been done with 8 core all terminated to the patch panel.

    If there was a problem with a core it can just be repatched.

    Ben

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