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Wireless Networks Thread, 2 DHCP's on 1 Network in Technical; Hi All I have DHCP running on my server at my house and my neighbor is on the same network, ...
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    Steven's Avatar
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    2 DHCP's on 1 Network

    Hi All I have DHCP running on my server at my house and my neighbor is on the same network, We have 2 internet routers, and when he plugs a network cable in to his pc's etc he gets assigned an IP address from my server but it points his computers to my internet router is there anyway of having a DHCP at his house which assigns his computers with an IP address and then having all the computers talk to each other still? Thanks Steven.

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    matt40k's Avatar
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    You can't have two DHCP on one network, ok there are ways round this, but it gets complex. I would just use static IPs.

    Why may I ask are you on 1 network, but with two internet connections? Is that correct?

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    FN-GM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by matt40k View Post
    Why may I ask are you on 1 network, but with two internet connections? Is that correct?
    He has a home setup and has a common network with his mate nextdoor. I presume this is so they can share resources and then play LAN games. He doesn't want his mates computers using his internet connection.

    Im thinking use a linux firewall between the physical connection and block the DHCP port, Thats as far as my knowledge goes on that thought. Can someone recomend a product for this?

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    Without knowing more about the reasoning behind the set up it's difficult to advise but yes, a firewall could work, as could several other ideas.

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    tmcd35's Avatar
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    If I understand what you want correctly, the answer is it can be done but you'll have to change your network setup.

    The first step would be to split it into two separate networks. They will need to be totally separate, no cables directly between the two. Each would be set up to get DHCP addresses from their own router.

    Make sure each router is on totally separate subnets. 192.168.1.x/255.255.255.0 and 192.168.2.x/255.255.255.0 will do fine.

    Now the trickey part. You'll need a pc with two NIC's. This PC should have 1 NIC plugged into each network. You then basically need to bridge the NIC's. I'd prefer a standalone machine running Linux to do this personally.

    Finally, you need to add a route rule to each PC on each network pointing to the bridging NIC on their side of the network.

    So for the 192.168.2.x network (from memory):

    route add -p 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.2.x

    and for 192.168.1.x:

    route add -p 192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.x

    replacing x with the IP of the appropriate NIC on the bridging server.
    There is a place within the windows DHCP settings (can't remember of top of head where) where you can put this rather than go round each machine and adding it manually. Your neighbours router may or may not have the option to send this info out with DHCP rather than doing it on each machine manually.

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    Heebeejeebee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmcd35 View Post
    Now the trickey part. You'll need a pc with two NIC's. This PC should have 1 NIC plugged into each network. You then basically need to bridge the NIC's. I'd prefer a standalone machine running Linux to do this personally.
    Just asking ... but could you not do this if you add a second IP address to a single NIC? I know they're pennies now but ....

    HBJB

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    If the DHCP servers can be configured to only allocate addresses to known MAC addresses then reservations could be set up in each DHCP server.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ajbritton View Post
    If the DHCP servers can be configured to only allocate addresses to known MAC addresses then reservations could be set up in each DHCP server.
    am presuming you mean you could do that from each of there routers but you would still need a firewall or something to stop dhcp on each of there networks from conflicting.

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    tmcd35's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heebeejeebee View Post
    Just asking ... but could you not do this if you add a second IP address to a single NIC? I know they're pennies now but ....

    HBJB
    AFAIK, no. Pretty much as has been said before (by others) you don't want DHCP traffic from 1 network infiltrating the other, thus the use of a bridge/gateway machine between the two network.

    The important bit is that the physical cabling for the two networks are kept totally separate.

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    nephilim's Avatar
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    stick with single networks and use a program called HAMACHI. It opens up your network for your usage only so you can fileshare, play lan games and various other features that you would get on a network.

    I use it and I am on a virtual network with my brother in glasgow and my father in law in America. Works fine for us.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nephilim View Post
    stick with single networks and use a program called HAMACHI. It opens up your network for your usage only so you can fileshare, play lan games and various other features that you would get on a network.

    I use it and I am on a virtual network with my brother in glasgow and my father in law in America. Works fine for us.
    Is there something like that for os x ( 10.5 ) aka Leopard ?

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    FN-GM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nephilim View Post
    stick with single networks and use a program called HAMACHI. It opens up your network for your usage only so you can fileshare, play lan games and various other features that you would get on a network.

    I use it and I am on a virtual network with my brother in glasgow and my father in law in America. Works fine for us.
    Basically its a VPN right?

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    nephilim's Avatar
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    effectively it is an online virtual network. Much like a VPN but unlike a VPN, you can play LAN games.

    And yes I believe there is a version for MAC OSX Leopard.


    https://secure.logmein.com/products/...pn.asp?lang=en < Download link to HAMACHI

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    FN-GM's Avatar
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    Much like a VPN but unlike a VPN, you can play LAN games.
    I didn't know that, why?

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    nephilim's Avatar
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    a VPN like a Cisco VPN physically will not allow games to play due to the port restrictions that it has, but HAMACHI does not have port restrictions on games.

  16. Thanks to nephilim from:

    FN-GM (15th November 2008)



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