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Wireless Networks Thread, 2 DHCP's on 1 Network in Technical; I would have to agree with the HAMACHI idea. Unless you want to join both your internet connections into one ...
  1. #16

    matt40k's Avatar
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    I would have to agree with the HAMACHI idea. Unless you want to join both your internet connections into one big pipe.

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    nephilim's Avatar
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    doing that is not a good idea, fine if you share the wireless between each other thats not much of a problem as if one goes down you have the other, but connecting the two and bridging them, the ISP's will clock on and fine you for it. I know as I bridged my Virgin Media, Orange and o2 connections together and got a 100 fine from each for doing so.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nephilim View Post
    doing that is not a good idea, fine if you share the wireless between each other thats not much of a problem as if one goes down you have the other, but connecting the two and bridging them, the ISP's will clock on and fine you for it. I know as I bridged my Virgin Media, Orange and o2 connections together and got a 100 fine from each for doing so.
    Really? Why was that? Surely if you did it right they would never know. It's only if you try bonding them that problems would occur.

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    nephilim's Avatar
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    when you bridge connections, it lets your ISP know what you are doing. For example if you bridge your wireless and your Ethernet card, the ISP will think you are just doing that to save mucking around with DHCP / IP addresses, but if you bridge connections from one ISP to another, it automatically notifies them, there isnt a way around it.

    Bonding the connections is a whole different avenue which I havent tried.

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    Mmm.... sounds like that was BGP\RIP\etc

    I've always used OpenBSD and use PF. This allows you to load balance incoming\outgoing connections and it doesn't need\try to update with ISP with new routes.

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    nephilim's Avatar
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    ahhh, that may well be an option for me!

  7. #22

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    Two books I'll recommend

    Secure Architectures: With OpenBSD by Brandon Palmerand it's come down alot in price too.

    Absolute OpenBSD: UNIX for the Practical Paranoid by Michael Lucas
    It's good, but really most of it in the man pages, which you can view for free on the Openbsd website.

    There is an good example on how to create a firewall on Openbsd website and some others around the web about load balancing. It's pretty straight forward, SSL (anything staticful) and FTP create a bit of a problem, but you can over come it with a good pf config.

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    ajbritton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mac_shinobi View Post
    am presuming you mean you could do that from each of there routers but you would still need a firewall or something to stop dhcp on each of there networks from conflicting.
    Multiple DHCP servers do not 'conflict' as such. Both servers will respond to the initial 'discover' broadcast request for IP address and client will choose whichever 'offer' it sees first.

    I've set up networks with multiple DHCP servers where the address ranges are split across multiple servers. Microsoft recommends this approach in certain circumstances either splitting range 80/20 or 50/50 depending on what is required (resilience or complex subnetting).

    In this instance though, my solution would only work if reservations were set up for ALL clients.

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