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Wireless Networks Thread, 802.11n and PoE in Technical; I have just ead an interesting article on the BlueSocket website (see http://bluesocket.com/Collateral/Doc...%20802.11n.pdf ) about 802.11n power requirements. This is ...
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    Ric_'s Avatar
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    Post 802.11n and PoE

    I have just ead an interesting article on the BlueSocket website (see http://bluesocket.com/Collateral/Doc...%20802.11n.pdf ) about 802.11n power requirements.

    This is something that I hadn't given any thought to but makes perfect sense. For those currently speccing wireless systems, this is possibly something that you need to ask your potential vendors.

  2. 3 Thanks to Ric_:

    contink (28th January 2008), dhicks (28th January 2008), Geoff (28th January 2008)

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    Geoff's Avatar
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    Makes sense. It's pretty shocking that some vendors can't stay within the 12W power limit though.

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    contink's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff View Post
    Makes sense. It's pretty shocking that some vendors can't stay within the 12W power limit though.
    ... and this weeks award for worst pun goes to...


    Anyway, back on topic... Thanks for that Ric... very timely as I was just getting into the 11n side of things with AP's.

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    802.11n POE

    Hi,

    Cisco have a power injector that will supply more power than 802.3af for thieir draft 802.11n access points - Aironet 1250, this is a properitory standard by cisco and provides up to 18W or so. I think the IEEE is working on POE Plus standard that will allow for more power to be put through the cable. Cisco own standard is called Enhanced PoE.

    While on the subject of 802.11n i think its also woth thinking about allowing a gigabit ethernet connection to the access point since 802.11n provdies more bandwidth than the other standards.

    Ash.

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    greenfieldsupport's Avatar
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    hmm is the more power used for the electronics side...

    or the child-brain-frying side ??

    Im guessing that if they still run at 2.4GHz they will still have to adhere to the transmit power limits yes?

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    gaz350's Avatar
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    im guessing that AP's that can run at both 2.4 and 5ghz(at the same time) require double the amount of antennae will also need more power too.

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    Geoff's Avatar
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    802.11n uses both frequencies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by greenfieldsupport View Post
    hmm is the more power used for the electronics side...

    or the child-brain-frying side ??

    Im guessing that if they still run at 2.4GHz they will still have to adhere to the transmit power limits yes?
    In that respect the article was quite useful.. I'd check it out as it provides a lot more intel than I could paraphrase here but to answer the question, CPU, RAM, etc... and the choices made seem to be the thrust of where most of the extra power goes.

    As regards n providing 11a and 11g... As noted in the article the suggestion is that you'd have to choose with some providers solutions, not have both.



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