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Wireless Networks Thread, 802.11b in Technical; That is not an answer to the question....
  1. #16

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    That is not an answer to the question.

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    Sorry, you're right - I didn't mean to be so short but I am struggling for time, I'm in the middle of something.

    By asking about devices, if you cam back with an answer then I would have been able to answer by referring to your device, it would have made the explanation easier.

    Basically, you won't find client devices that support 40MHz in 2.4 GHz, and many access points either won't support 40 MHz or won't enable it if they detect ANY non 40 MHz transmissions.

    It's all to do with co-existance, and the realisation that if you put up 40MHz you will probably interfere with someone, somewhere, so 40 MHz is just not deployable in 2.4 GHz. If you want 40 MHz you MUSt go to 5 GHz.

    You will see the same thing with 802.11ac, people rushing to deploy it without ANY of their client devices able to make use of it.

    If Chazzy2501 tells me what devices he used in his test, I can point out why it would not have been 40MHz - not to embarrass him, but to show how to find these things for your own devices.

    Or, Psydii, tell me what you commonly deploy (Ap model and client type) and I will explain for your devices.

    NM

  3. #18

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    We've got the Easter break coming up. If I get time I'll have a play with our configs here and see what happens when I turn on the 40mhz options.

  4. #19

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    Much easier, just tell me the make/model of devices you use and I can show you.

  5. #20

    mac_shinobi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by neilmac View Post
    Much easier, just tell me the make/model of devices you use and I can show you.
    Just guessing here but the devices that do have or use a B wifi card - wouldn't it make sense to upgrade these so they support G or N and that way you would only need one WiFi Network for G, Two for N ( one 2.4ghz and one 5ghz ) ??

    Am sure @neilmac will give you a better answer

  6. #21

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    I haven't seen a "b" only capable device in a long time, so I doubt anyone is really using them. It's just not relevant any more.

    Does anyone have anything like that ? I would be uber surprised.

  7. #22
    MicrodigitUK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by neilmac View Post
    I haven't seen a "b" only capable device in a long time, so I doubt anyone is really using them. It's just not relevant any more.

    Does anyone have anything like that ? I would be uber surprised.
    Look at the spec for these devices our science department use. That is only 802.11b. No support for eaven 802.1X and the units are not that old 2011 ish with a new one coming out soon with the same WiFi spec:
    http://www.dataharvest.co.uk/distributor/files/documents/loggers/2020/d0233_5_easysense_vision_manual.pdf
    There defiantly are new 802.11b devices out there. LOL

  8. #23

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    Wow, I stand corrected. That's a great find. I still see "b" devices in industrial settings, but I haven't seen these before, and definitely not anything like this is a school. I need to get me on of these for training classes. This is exactly the thing that will significantly affect throughput.

    These will definitely be a problem. Any one of these connected is going to put a major portion of the network into protected mode. I couldn't find a certificate for them from the WiFi alliance, so there's no way to know if they even operate correctly. The saving grace is that they probably transmit really low power levels, but the damage is the same as the protection triggers when it associates to an access point.

    If you must have these, then get as many devices as you can into 5 GHz, and reduce power in 2.4 GHZ, turn off the 2.4 radios on access points where you don't need it.

    Wow... If you rely on good throughput for your network, with these dotted around, you're gonna have a bad time.

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