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Windows Server 2008 Thread, 2008 R2 in Technical; Does anyone know if you will be able to update 2008 servers to R2 with a patch or will it ...
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    2008 R2

    Does anyone know if you will be able to update 2008 servers to R2 with a patch or will it have to be a reinstall?

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    matt40k's Avatar
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    Reinstalled\Upgraded. Personally I would class it as a new OS, therefore, reinstall. Be careful.

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    2003 to 2003 R2 was a simple upgrade. I would suspect the same for 2008 Server. I can't see you having to reinstall the OS for an upgrade.

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    There is an upgrade path from 2008 to 2008 R2 however some caveats apply, the main being that 32bit can't be upgraded only 64bit and you can only upgrade to the same or higher edition (e.g. Standard -> Standard/Ent/Data and not Ent -> Standard, etc). There's more info available about upgrade paths at Installing This Release Candidate of Windows Server 2008 R2

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    matt40k's Avatar
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    Oh, forgot to say, MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A FULL SYSTEM BACKUP BEFORE YOU START

    Quote Originally Posted by markberry View Post
    2003 to 2003 R2 was a simple upgrade. I would suspect the same for 2008 Server. I can't see you having to reinstall the OS for an upgrade.
    What did you have installed? Anything non-microsoft?

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    I can't see any major reason to upgrade to 2k8 R2 though. The new features arn't anything we'd need.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff View Post
    I can't see any major reason to upgrade to 2k8 R2 though. The new features arn't anything we'd need.
    Only Windows 7 support

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    Improvements for All Active Directory Server Roles

    Windows Server 2008 R2 includes the following identity management improvements that affect all Active Directory server roles:

    Recovery of deleted objects.
    Improved process for joining domains.
    Improved management of user accounts used as identity for services.
    Reduced effort to perform common administrative tasks.

    Windows File Classification Infrastructure (FCI) in Windows Server 2008 R2 Overview
    Windows Server 2008 R2 File Classification Infrastructure (FCI) provides insight into your data by automating classification processes so that you can manage your data more effectively and economically. FCI does this by enabling to automatically classify files based on properties defined by administrators (such as whether or not a file contains personally identifiable information) and performing administrator-specified actions based on that classification (backing up files containing personal information to an encrypted store, for example). These mechanisms are included in the box as well as provided by extensible interfaces that allow IT organizations and partners to build rich end to end solutions for classifying and applying policy based on classification. FCI helps customers save money and reduce risk by managing files based on their business value and business impact.
    You can use the Windows File Classification Infrastructure to identify files that:
    Contain sensitive information and are located on servers with lower security and move the files to servers with higher security.
    Contain sensitive information and encrypt those files.
    Are no longer essential and automatically remove the files from servers.
    Are not accessed frequently and move the files to slower, more affordable storage solutions.
    Require different backup schedules and backup the files accordingly.
    Require different backup solutions based on the sensitivity of the information in the files.
    The Windows File Classification Infrastructure allows you to:
    Centrally define policy-based classification of the files stored in your intranet.
    Perform file management tasks based on the file classification that you define, rather than on only simple information such as the location, size, or date of the file.
    Generate reports about the types of information stored in the files in your intranet.
    Notify content owners when a file management task is going to be performed on their content.
    Create or purchase custom file management solutions based on the Windows File Classification Infrastructure.

    Reduced multicore processor power consumption
    Windows Server 2008 R2 reduces processor power consumption in server computers with multicore processors by using a feature known as Core Parking. The Core Parking feature allows Windows Server 2008 R2 to consolidate processing onto the fewest number of possible processor cores, and suspends inactive processor cores.
    Reduced processor power consumption by adjusting processor speed
    Windows Server 2008 R2 has the ability to adjust the ACPI “P-states” of processors and subsequently adjust server power consumption. ACPI “P-states” are the processor performance states within the ACPI specification. Depending on the processor architecture, Windows Server 2008 R2 can adjust the “P-states” of individual processors and provide very fine control over power consumption.
    Reduced storage power consumption
    Another key method for reducing power in data centers is by centralizing the storage, typically by using a Storage Area Network (SAN). Because SANs tend to have higher-capacity drives for the same amount of power consumption, the storage capacity–to–power consumption ratio in a SAN is higher than in a typical server computer. SANs also make more efficient use of the available disk space, as any server can have access to the available storage on the SAN.

    And lots more... Windows Server 2008 R2: Getting Started

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    matt40k's Avatar
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    I can see the recover deleted objects making removing stuff really hard. Roll on a virus.
    Also Windows not correctly idenify the file correctly.

    Quote Originally Posted by localzuk View Post
    Are no longer essential and automatically remove the files from servers.
    Are not accessed frequently and move the files to slower, more affordable storage solutions.
    Doesn't that just worry you, I hope that's not from out-of-the-box. I can just hear the calls now...

    Bursar: "Hi, I can't open my spreadsheet"
    You: "When did you last use it?"
    Bursar: "Last year when I was working out the salary budget for the year"

    Question will be, did it move it to that NAS that died, or has it deleted it? Na, I'm sure it's be fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by markberry View Post
    2003 to 2003 R2 was a simple upgrade. I would suspect the same for 2008 Server. I can't see you having to reinstall the OS for an upgrade.
    2008 R2 isn't a small upgrade at all and MS should be slapped for advertising it as such. 2003 R2 was based on the standard 2003 codebase and used the same service packs, it wasn't really much aside from a CD with extra features.

    2008 R2 however is based on the Windows 7 codebase and not the standard 2008 codebase so it will use different service packs, updates and drivers (Although most 2008 ones will work). It is essentially a completely different product.

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    localzuk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by matt40k View Post
    I can see the recover deleted objects making removing stuff really hard. Roll on a virus.
    Also Windows not correctly idenify the file correctly.



    Doesn't that just worry you, I hope that's not from out-of-the-box. I can just hear the calls now...

    Bursar: "Hi, I can't open my spreadsheet"
    You: "When did you last use it?"
    Bursar: "Last year when I was working out the salary budget for the year"

    Question will be, did it move it to that NAS that died, or has it deleted it? Na, I'm sure it's be fine.
    Well, neither of those things worry me. The first one sounds good to me! Being able to easily recover deleted active directory objects would be a very nice feature.

    And the other item sounds like a brilliant idea! Have a NAS box running which archives files that don't get used for 12 months or more (it would have to be more than 12 months in a school). Then, after another year, they get compressed and stuck on a backup tape/removable device and stored.

    It all depends on two things though - how you run your network, and the needs of your school.

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    I just think when you delete something it should be deleted, not put in the recycle bin, specially if it's AD. I can just image delete a GP then it reappearing. Still, unlikely to happen, but it is more of a n00by feature, just hope people still backup AD.

    Surely the only person who can "archive" data is the person, other then that, you move it tape (or such) once they leave along with disabling there user account, then destory it after the correct period as part of your housekeeping.

    Oh, I've attached the legal requirements for storaging data, not quite sure how you can remove the data from your MIS. Not heard of any such feature in SIMS! I'm currently in that dream world that it's automatically gets removed... la la la
    Attached Files Attached Files

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    localzuk's Avatar
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    Well, put it this we have a public drive that contains lesson plans from 4 years ago, that haven't been touched. I will never delete them, but because no-one ever gets rid of such documents, they just fester on. A feature which auto-archives would solve that.

    And I seriously can't see your problem with a recovery tool in the AD? Everyone, no matter who they are, has accidentally deleted an account they shouldn't have etc... Everyone makes mistakes, and a simple recovery tool will make things much better. At the moment, it is not possible to easily recover something.

    We have the ability to recover documents, sql fields and every other aspect of a network but not the AD...

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    Quote Originally Posted by localzuk View Post
    Well, put it this we have a public drive that contains lesson plans from 4 years ago, that haven't been touched. I will never delete them, but because no-one ever gets rid of such documents, they just fester on. A feature which auto-archives would solve that.

    And I seriously can't see your problem with a recovery tool in the AD? Everyone, no matter who they are, has accidentally deleted an account they shouldn't have etc... Everyone makes mistakes, and a simple recovery tool will make things much better. At the moment, it is not possible to easily recover something.

    We have the ability to recover documents, sql fields and every other aspect of a network but not the AD...

    Fair enough. Does suck when users don't help and you get moaned at if you do it yourself.

    You get the option to delete GP or just unlink them, recovery seems such as waste. Generally you shouldn't be adding\changing GP regularly. You should have a backup of the AD anyway, I mean what happens if your AD server dieds? Symantec Backup Exec offers an agent for AD if you want to restore a policy, fair enough this will only be doing it at the end of the day, where as MS will be 24/7, but really. What with Microsoft rep for Offline sync I can see an old GP overriding a new one, still the SID should stop this. Anyway, I'm just ranting, I just see people making less backups when they should be doing more (IT being used more and all that rubbish).

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt40k View Post
    Fair enough. Does suck when users don't help and you get moaned at if you do it yourself.

    You get the option to delete GP or just unlink them, recovery seems such as waste. Generally you shouldn't be adding\changing GP regularly. You should have a backup of the AD anyway, I mean what happens if your AD server dieds? Symantec Backup Exec offers an agent for AD if you want to restore a policy, fair enough this will only be doing it at the end of the day, where as MS will be 24/7, but really. What with Microsoft rep for Offline sync I can see an old GP overriding a new one, still the SID should stop this. Anyway, I'm just ranting, I just see people making less backups when they should be doing more (IT being used more and all that rubbish).
    You're focussing on one AD object - the GPO. What about groups, accounts, OUs, and every other OU object? There is a massive amount to an AD, not just GPOs.

    A backup of an AD is only good for one event - catastrophic failure. Not for recovering someone's account you've accidentally wiped. And why should we pay for a module to backup our AD as individual parts when it will be built in directly?

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