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Windows 8 Thread, The desktop will be removed on smaller Windows tablets in Windows 9.0 in Technical; I'd be angry of they pull the desktop on my atom tablets, it makes them twice as useful, if you ...
  1. #16

    SYNACK's Avatar
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    I'd be angry of they pull the desktop on my atom tablets, it makes them twice as useful, if you can still run all desktop apps then maybe but if they remove that feature mine will be covered in cow manure and delivered to MS NZs reception desk.

  2. Thanks to SYNACK from:

    gshaw (2nd July 2014)

  3. #17

    Michael's Avatar
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    Microsoft should allow admins to choose at Sysprep level what kind of interface they want end users to have.

    Sysprep could then be set to manually specify an interface, or automated depending on the requirements. Microsoft have to realise business and education like consistency when it comes to user interfaces.

  4. #18
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    The words removed and forced don't fill me with confidence, just give users choice to use the UI they feel most comfortable with. I don't mind the live tiles on my desktop so leave me the choice if I want to remove them or not!

    The "we know best" attitude that got forced down with the initial release of Windows 8 is one of the main reasons people hated it so much, had the "boot to desktop" checkbox from 8.1 been there from the start (no pun intended ) the change wouldn't have been so jarring.
    Last edited by gshaw; 2nd July 2014 at 12:29 PM.

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    SYNACK (2nd July 2014), zag (7th July 2014)

  6. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by gshaw View Post
    The "we know best" attitude that got forced down with the initial release of Windows 8 is one of the main reasons people hated it so much.
    I don't think that's totally fair - a LOT of research went into designing and testing the Modern UI (The Story of Windows 8) but it was probably done on the assumption that the way we use devices would be further ahead that perhaps it is; i.e. fewer people would be using traditional desktops and laptops and there'd be greater penetration of touch-enabled devices.

    When you make a big change, some things you get right straight away and others you have to refine (i.e. Windows 8.1, and Windows 8.1 Update) based on feedback.

    After all, you could've ended up with something awful... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7lm6v4XsUpY

  7. #20

    Michael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesbmarshall View Post
    I don't think that's totally fair - a LOT of research went into designing and testing the Modern UI (The Story of Windows 8) but it was probably done on the assumption that the way we use devices would be further ahead that perhaps it is; i.e. fewer people would be using traditional desktops and laptops and there'd be greater penetration of touch-enabled devices.

    When you make a big change, some things you get right straight away and others you have to refine (i.e. Windows 8.1, and Windows 8.1 Update) based on feedback.

    After all, you could've ended up with something awful... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7lm6v4XsUpY
    So if that's the case, who in their right mind decided that forcing a new UI on everyone was a good idea? The research argument clearly hasn't worked. I also find it strange bearing in mind Microsoft now appear to be releasing new OSes every 2 years.

    Do Microsoft consider Windows 8 or 8.1 a success, bearing in mind the actual numbers are less than 5% globally, compared with over 50% for Windows 7?

  8. #21

    sparkeh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesbmarshall View Post
    I don't think that's totally fair - a LOT of research went into designing and testing the Modern UI (The Story of Windows 8) but it was probably done on the assumption that the way we use devices would be further ahead that perhaps it is; i.e. fewer people would be using traditional desktops and laptops and there'd be greater penetration of touch-enabled devices.

    When you make a big change, some things you get right straight away and others you have to refine (i.e. Windows 8.1, and Windows 8.1 Update) based on feedback.
    I can't see how anyone can claim that Modern UI wasn't forced on us. MS patently said to us "This is the way its going to be get used to it". If it was based on research then you seriously have to question MS's research methods as Modern UI has been almost universally negatively received and only addressed after a long period of continued negative feedback.

  9. #22


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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael View Post
    Do Microsoft consider Windows 8 or 8.1 a success, bearing in mind the actual numbers are less than 5% globally, compared with over 50% for Windows 7?
    Windows 7 was released almost five years ago, whereas Windows 8 was released 19 months ago and Windows 8.1 eight months ago. Doesn't it stand to reason that the older OS will be installed on more PCs than the newer editions of Windows especially with sales of PCs declining overall?

    One in five Macs still run Snow Leopard, but that doesn't mean OS X Mavericks was a failure, does it?
    Last edited by Arthur; 7th July 2014 at 10:25 AM.

  10. #23

    sparkeh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arthur View Post
    Windows 7 was released almost five years ago, whereas Windows 8 was released 19 months ago and Windows 8.1 eight months ago. Doesn't it stand to reason that the older OS will be installed on more PCs than the newer editions of Windows especially with sales of PCs declining overall?

    One in five Macs still runs Snow Leopard, but that doesn't mean OS X Mavericks was a failure, does it?
    Perhaps a fairer comparison is would be licences sold over a comparable period after OS release:
    From Windows 8 sales are down millions on Windows 7- The Inquirer
    Speaking at a Goldman Sachs conference, Microsoft marketing executive Tami Reller told delegates that Windows 8 has shifted 200 million licences in its first 15 months, compared to the 240 million that Windows 7 managed to sell in just one year
    Remember that a lot of enterprise customers are buying Win 8 licences and downgrading to Win 7 (something I seriously doubt happened with 7 and Vista), making the comparison worse.

  11. #24

    Michael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arthur View Post
    Windows 7 was released almost five years ago, whereas Windows 8 was released 19 months ago and Windows 8.1 eight months ago. Doesn't it stand to reason that the older OS will be installed on more PCs than the newer editions of Windows especially with sales of PCs declining overall?

    One in five Macs still runs Snow Leopard, but that doesn't mean OS X Mavericks was a failure, does it?
    Windows Vista never reached a 50% share now did it? That's considerably older than Windows 7. The decline of PCs is something else altogether, with the rise in popularity of phones and tablets. I also think (I suppose similar to a car), most users expect a computer to last 5 or more years before replacing it and buying a new or newer one.

    The Apple model has changed, so bearing in mind it's free (Mavericks), I can only speculate it's a compatibility issue or something else which is holding some users back from upgrading.

  12. #25

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    As long as they don't force you to get updates via the store again I don't care what they call them
    Why did Microsoft do that, it is a real pain for me when setting up new machines.

  13. #26
    zag
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    Windows 9 will no doubt be awesome.

    - Desktops actually boot to the desktop
    - Metro apps running inside windows finally
    - Metro actually being useful on a tablet finally

    Sounds like some sensible decisions. Now if they could only work out this ARM thing so it the same software works on all platforms we might get somewhere.

  14. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by zag View Post
    Windows 9 will no doubt be awesome.

    - Desktops actually boot to the desktop
    - Metro apps running inside windows finally
    - Metro actually being useful on a tablet finally

    Sounds like some sensible decisions. Now if they could only work out this ARM thing so it the same software works on all platforms we might get somewhere.
    Well ARM is something else altogether - it's OK for specialist technologies such as network switches, but not so much end users where little software actually runs on it. I don't actually see the point where we have a perfectly acceptable, usable and scalable 64Bit architecture why we need something else?

  15. #28


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    Quote Originally Posted by sparkeh View Post
    Remember that a lot of enterprise customers are buying Win 8 licences and downgrading to Win 7 (something I seriously doubt happened with 7 and Vista)
    Enterprise customers are notoriously slow at upgrading (mainly due to legacy hardware and software) and almost always downgrade their licenses - it's expected.

    Some are just now switching to Windows 7 from XP or 2000.

  16. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael View Post
    Well ARM is something else altogether - it's OK for specialist technologies such as network switches, but not so much end users where little software actually runs on it. I don't actually see the point where we have a perfectly acceptable, usable and scalable 64Bit architecture why we need something else?
    The main reason is power usage - ARM uses a lot less power still.

  17. #30

    Michael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by localzuk View Post
    The main reason is power usage - ARM uses a lot less power still.
    That can't be the only reason surely? I'm pretty sure Intel and AMD make low power chips? You could argue better battery technology is what is needed.

    If ARM are that good, they should be able to make an x86 compatible low powered chip rather than re-work all software. It's a backwards way of thinking.

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