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Windows 7 Thread, windows 7 and SSD. Best practice? in Technical; I rememeber when I bought my EEE back when, the recommendation was to disable page file etc as the flash ...
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    RabbieBurns's Avatar
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    windows 7 and SSD. Best practice?

    I rememeber when I bought my EEE back when, the recommendation was to disable page file etc as the flash memory had a limited number of read/writes.

    Is this the same for modern SSD drives?

    IVe just upgraded my laptop to 8GB RAM and a 128GB OCZ SSD and just wondering what the general consensus was now with regards to the read/write limitaiton of Solid state. Is it negligable?

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    Quote Originally Posted by RabbieBurns View Post
    Is this the same for modern SSD drives?
    No. The page file should be located on the SSD. This is what Microsoft suggest too.

    Quote Originally Posted by RabbieBurns View Post
    just wondering what the general consensus was now with regards to the read/write limitation of solid state. Is it negligable?
    The write limits are a non-issue even with the latest 25nm drives.

    For a desktop user running a desktop (non-server) workload, the chances of your drive dying within its warranty period due to you wearing out all of the NAND are basically nothing. Note that this doesn't mean that your drive won't die for other reasons before then (e.g. poor manufacturing, controller/firmware issues, etc...), but you don't really have to worry about your NAND wearing out. (Source)
    Remember that the JEDEC spec states that once you've used up all of your rated program/erase cycles, the NAND has to keep your data safe for a year. So even in the unlikely event that you burn through all 3000 p/e cycles and let's assume for a moment that you have some uncharacteristically bad NAND that doesn't last for even one cycle beyond its rating, you should have a full year's worth of data retention left on the drive. (Source)
    If you cloned your Windows 7 install from a HDD to your new SSD, make sure you run WEI again. This will disable things like the scheduled defrag (while still leaving it enabled for any HDDs you may have). If however you did a clean install of Windows 7, then there's nothing else you need to do, other than perhaps disabling hibernate to free up 8GBs of disk space (assuming you don't need to hibernate your computer that is).

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