+ Post New Thread
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 57
Windows 7 Thread, Windows XP, great new look in Technical; Certainly for end users who arent so techie and especially those who havent already got used to XP then windows ...
  1. #31

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    shadowx@AllEvil:/
    Posts
    222
    Thank Post
    12
    Thanked 28 Times in 25 Posts
    Rep Power
    14
    Certainly for end users who arent so techie and especially those who havent already got used to XP then windows 7 is the OS of choice but as i support the machines i still prefer XP to tinker with. I do like the UI of 7 but the start menu ruins it and im not a fan of the taskbar to be honest either. But personal preference doesnt make it good or bad i just dont like it.

    The point stands though that windows 7 is like a maze to get to relatively simple network features like TCP/IP control. and as noted already the control panel in general is pretty poor. *shrugs* i still like win 7 but it isnt perfect.

  2. #32

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    liverpool
    Posts
    1
    Thank Post
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by chazzy2501 View Post
    I've always had a huge problem with both vista and windows7. it's like the supermarket they know you just want bread and milk so every 6 months they rearrange the shelves hoping you buy something you don't need.

    So with Vista and Win7 they've changed all whole gui to make it easier? easier for who? The people who've been using XP for the last 8 years and can navigate it at the speed of light? No... for new users who've never used a PC before... well fantastic, so you made them for the 0.0009% of users who've never use XP and want they're first PC to be Windows... my butt, those people buy MACs!

    So everyone else.. you remember 99.9991% who use XP now have to relearn where everything is and start using the new OS at the same speed as their grannys!

    p.s. The other day it took me 20 minutes (and I had to google it) to show hidden and system files on win 7. It took me 10 minutes to configure my wireless settings, I couldn't just click on the wireless icon anymore! I turned bright red and my shpincter ate the chair.

    WIH


    chazzy2501 can't believe it took 20 mins to find hidden files,i just typed in search box hidden and in my lowly 512 mb's Win7 it took 10 seconds to first show hidden files and folders,and do the same for any other thing you are looking for.

    XP is now an old croc ready for the graveyard!

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    shadowx@AllEvil:/
    Posts
    222
    Thank Post
    12
    Thanked 28 Times in 25 Posts
    Rep Power
    14
    XP is now an old croc ready for the graveyard!
    But why?! Everyone says it but few give reasons.

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Chelmsford, Essex
    Posts
    144
    Thank Post
    8
    Thanked 21 Times in 14 Posts
    Rep Power
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by Gibbo View Post
    If you think XP will be "left in the dumps this year with its support expiring and new programs now becoming incompatible with it" I have to say that I don't think your finger is on the pulse of IT.

    XP support has been extended - that tells you something. Just take a look at the reader comments on any XP / 2000 / Vista / 7 articles on The Register.
    Excuse my ignorance on this fact. Okay, 2014 is the extension from what I've discovered now (because we only deploy XP on very few machines now). Only because the whole industry made a fuss about Vista and took a blind eye to it. Our school grabbed the opportunity to deploy Vista. Some might say it was a very unwise and foolish decision, but we worked through the very few issues we had. People who are still are on XP will have the more difficulty to jump to 7 because they missed our learning/installing the new systems Microsoft introduced for deployment and licensing. I guess that's why there's more reason for some to stick with the old from schools still on Windows XP. Saying XP is faster than Windows 7 is debatable like any other technical comparison. It's hardware dependant and even on some of our older AMD and Intel Shuttle based machines, Windows 7 can quite easily match XP SP3. This is why we were glad of the Windows 7 release when it appeared.

    My experience has shown that schools and businesses will not be upgrading their kit for some time, certainly not just for the excuse of a new OS which provides nothing but a flashy UI to compete with Macs. 7 is faster than Vista, but XP knocks it into a cocked hat.
    I personally don't believe it's healthy for students to be behind. I know cost will probably be big issue to upgrade for many schools, but when laptops are much more affordable and including Windows 7 as standard; is it good for an educational establishment to be using an almost 10 year old operating system (especially at Junior and Secondary level)? UI enhancements such as the pinned/tidy taskbar, instant split screen, quick search from start menu (and customisable from Group Policy). I know XP is seen as clean and classic, but it is simply old now. Doesn't reflect the initiative interfaces in many new products (touchscreen phones, iPads, touchscreen computers, netbooks).

    Connecting wireless on XP takes "several clicks"? I think not. Click the wireless icon in the tray by the clock. Click the access point you want to connect to. Put in the key. Job done.
    It's certainly a couple of extra clicks more (and slower waiting for the huge wireless box to appear) in comparison to Windows 7 "2 click" process straight from the taskbar.

    7 not bloated? There's a reason it comes on a DVD as opposed to a CD for XP!
    What operating system isn't on DVD now? Even the bigger linux distro's are DVD worthy now. I know that shows how bare XP is as a functional OS.

    Which apps are incompatible with XP? If that's truly the case, why did 7 have an XP compatibility mode?
    I'm talking forward compatibility, not backward compatibility. Microsoft were at least clever enough to recognise that some developers refuse to push forward or don't develop any more and legacy products need XP support.

    There's less reason to keep with XP now Windows 7 is around (especially when a new hardware refreshes are expected) and how well it will cope with any hardware you throw at it. That's my stance knowing that I use most operating systems daily.

  5. #35

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    London
    Posts
    3,159
    Thank Post
    116
    Thanked 529 Times in 452 Posts
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    125
    Quote Originally Posted by chazzy2501 View Post
    p.s. The other day it took me 20 minutes (and I had to google it) to show hidden and system files on win 7. It took me 10 minutes to configure my wireless settings, I couldn't just click on the wireless icon anymore! I turned bright red and my shpincter ate the chair.
    Press Windows and type "Wireless" or type "Hidden" - not exactly difficult (and I know it's different but the point if you want to do anything with Windows 7 you "press Windows and type a key word")

    No idea what you mean about hidden files. In XP I would press Windows E to open Explorer and then do ALT T O to get to Tools | Options and then just click view. In Windows 7 I do exactly the same thing - I'm guessing you knew some secret way to do it in XP which no longer works :-)

  6. #36
    PeteM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    123
    Thank Post
    6
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    Rep Power
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by Gibbo View Post
    I'm also in the XP camp, and it certainly isn't "dated".

    7 would be great if they hadn't completely removed the "classic" option. I don't like a wide Start Menu.

    I think some people forget that an OS is primarily there to provide a platform for running apps. I'd rather my memory and processor power go on the application I'm running, not the OS.
    Absolutely. Unfortunately, Microsoft has tried (& failed on many counts) to be all things to all users.

  7. #37


    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    51.403651, -0.515458
    Posts
    9,808
    Thank Post
    262
    Thanked 2,969 Times in 2,183 Posts
    Rep Power
    847
    Quote Originally Posted by Gibbo View Post
    My experience has shown that schools and businesses will not be upgrading their kit for some time, certainly not just for the excuse of a new OS which provides nothing but a flashy UI to compete with Macs. 7 is faster than Vista, but XP knocks it into a cocked hat.
    This is so wrong I don't even know where to start. There is a huge long list of new features and improvements in Windows 7. While a lot of them are behind-the-scenes (much like Apple's Snow Leopard update) calling it nothing but a flashy UI is a huge exaggeration and completely incorrect.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gibbo View Post
    XP support has been extended - that tells you something.
    It does. It tells you that there are far too many Luddite's in this world who don't like any kind of progress.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gibbo View Post
    7 not bloated? There's a reason it comes on a DVD as opposed to a CD for XP!
    Bloat is completely relative. The largest HDD in August 2001 (when XP was released) was 60GB (or 1.14% of a CD). The largest HDD, when Windows 7 was released in October 2009 was 2TB (or 0.21% of a DVD). I don't think anyone is going to complain about losing 1-2% (or less) of their HDDs capacity. Processors have also seen massive speed increases in the last decade too.

    Would you rather have a single DVD with all editions of Windows 7 on it, or multiple CDs each with a different editions of XP on them (Home, Pro, MCE, Tablet PC)?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gibbo View Post
    Which apps are incompatible with XP? If that's truly the case, why did 7 have an XP compatibility mode?
    There's IE9, Windows Live Essentials and anything which involves playing Blu-Ray discs (XP doesn't support HDCP). The XP compatibility mode in Windows 7 won't help you with any of these. I'm sure there are plenty of other programs.

  8. #38

    mac_shinobi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    10,053
    Thank Post
    3,585
    Thanked 1,123 Times in 1,025 Posts
    Rep Power
    377
    Quote Originally Posted by Arthur View Post
    This is so wrong I don't even know where to start. There is a huge long list of new features and improvements in Windows 7. While a lot of them are behind-the-scenes (much like Apple's Snow Leopard update) calling it nothing but a flashy UI is a huge exaggeration and completely incorrect.

    It does. It tells you that there are far too many Luddite's in this world who don't like any kind of progress.


    Bloat is completely relative. The largest HDD in August 2001 (when XP was released) was 60GB (or 1.14% of a CD). The largest HDD, when Windows 7 was released in October 2009 was 2TB (or 0.21% of a DVD). I don't think anyone is going to complain about losing 1-2% (or less) of their HDDs capacity. Processors have also seen massive speed increases in the last decade too.

    Would you rather have a single DVD with all editions of Windows 7 on it, or multiple CDs each with a different editions of XP on them (Home, Pro, MCE, Tablet PC)?


    There's IE9, Windows Live Essentials and anything which involves playing Blu-Ray discs (XP doesn't support HDCP). The XP compatibility mode in Windows 7 won't help you with any of these. I'm sure there are plenty of other programs.
    1. Snow leopards update from Leopard was a half way house between an upgrade and an update because

    A - it added true 64 bit support with 32 bit backward compatibility --> In the same way that if you originally purchased a 32 bit version of windows, you don't get the 64 bit version for £25 afaik you have to fork out the full amount for the 64 bit version of said operating system so not bad although I will admit they could of possibly added more feature wise but all in all not bad for £25 considering they did add grand central dispatch ( as far as helping multi tasking across multiple processor cores etc ) along with the other behind the scenes features / additions.

    2. Not that I don't agree with progress as I do because on the mac side I am using snow leopard and I have not stuck with tiger or leopard but personally ( this is my own personal opinion / preference etc ) but I think office 2007 is not great in comparison to 2003 and also that most people still use 2003 so easier to stay with 2003 and I didn't really get on with office 2007, I would much rather either use office 2003 or open office, I know they are making office 2010 but have not bothered with it as it's not really a big thing to me.

    3. I think they should of done something similar to linux ( on linux if you want fancy graphics effects for the GUI you use something like compiz ) reference the extra graphics features such as aero , printer drivers, languages, keyboard layouts where by if you want the extra things you add them on ( control panel --> add / remove windows components ) and with it being a UK version of windows 7 obviously make the default keyboard layout UK Great Britain ) and if its the US version then obviously make it the US Keyboard layout. Same for Aero , if you want it, then add it on, if not then its not taking up space on your hard drive. The same with the GUI make the classic one the default so as not to use resources and if people want the extra flashy GUI then they can add it and apply it.

    Not really used windows 7 that much to be honest but just to get an idea how much space capacity wise does a base default install take up ?? I think ( could be wrong as haven't installed snow leopard for a long time ) takes up around 11gb ( give or take a few gigs )

    Also with reference to your capacity statements - just because windows 7 is released does not mean everyone will run out and upgrade current hardware ie hard drive to a larger capacity.

    Also with regards to having one dvd or multiple cd's for the OS - I would prefer if they did what apple did, just have one disc for the OS ( if they include extra software like on the mac where you have iLife, etc then have the extras on the 2nd dvd ) and whilst on this point before Apple dropped support for PPC they used to include PPC and intel OS installer on one disc ( I think ) could be wrong as I do know that intel only mac book pros had an intel only installation disc but until snow leopard the applications at least still had ppc code / stuff in them because when you went to show package contents you could see it had extra stuff in them that was not required on an intel platform

    4. Could be wrong on your blu ray point ref xp - I was under the impression it was down to all the hardware supporting HDCP although there is the work around of using SlySoft AnyDVD HD

    point 4 does not bother me ref blu ray as I have and use a PS 3 so not bothered about that - I always get rid of windows live essentials and other stuff like that as when I install msn messenger on windows I only literally want that not anything else
    Last edited by mac_shinobi; 21st July 2010 at 07:05 PM.

  9. #39
    Quackers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,450
    Thank Post
    45
    Thanked 160 Times in 135 Posts
    Rep Power
    57
    OK, i am back on my Windows 7 laptop at the moment, and i am getting wound up.

    Anybody have a solution to why when i click the "Documents" library, i get items from under my user documents and the "public" documents, and how i can make it NOT show the public ones?I am getting folders listed twice with the same name, and it makes my head hurt, never mind the normal users. Right clicking on the "Documents" library, properties, and removing the Public folder from the list is not doable, because that will only do it for ME, what about everybody elses user account on the network.

    I have tried removing librarys using the adm templates somebody has made, that makes things worse, because on the save/open dialog windows i do not get a "My Documents" link on the left.

    I have loved every new MS OS Since Windows 3.0 and all its new features. I have agreed with most of their logic in changes, and enjoyed the new versions. Vista/7 is the first time this has not been the case and it seems like MS have made things longer to do, thats not making this easier, or advancing! It feels like MS have made everything now take 1 click more than it did before, for example these two things.

    Renaming a computer

    Windows 7,

    Right click "Computer", click "Advanced System Settings", Click Computer name tab, then "Change"

    Windows XP

    Right click "My Computer", click Computer name tab, then Change.

    Why does quickly finding my IP of the Wireless adaptor via a GUI now take longer?

    Windows 7,

    Click Wireless icon by clock, click "open network and sharing centre" , then click "Wireless Network Connection"

    Windows XP,

    Double click wireless icon, then click details tab.

    This is why my head hurts running Windows 7, things take longer, and have been moved not to make it quicker to get too, but to take it longer to get too! I wish i could have a few hours with the Vista/7 team, i have a few choice words for them!

    Now Office 2010, i love that, that is change for the better.

  10. #40

    localzuk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Minehead
    Posts
    18,529
    Thank Post
    527
    Thanked 2,648 Times in 2,049 Posts
    Blog Entries
    24
    Rep Power
    925
    Quote Originally Posted by Quackers View Post
    OK, i am back on my Windows 7 laptop at the moment, and i am getting wound up.

    Anybody have a solution to why when i click the "Documents" library, i get items from under my user documents and the "public" documents, and how i can make it NOT show the public ones?I am getting folders listed twice with the same name, and it makes my head hurt, never mind the normal users. Right clicking on the "Documents" library, properties, and removing the Public folder from the list is not doable, because that will only do it for ME, what about everybody elses user account on the network.
    Right click on it and view the properties - each library allows you to specify what gets listed.

    Renaming a computer

    Windows 7,

    Right click "Computer", click "Advanced System Settings", Click Computer name tab, then "Change"

    Windows XP

    Right click "My Computer", click Computer name tab, then Change.
    Globe -> Type 'Rename my computer'.

    Why does quickly finding my IP of the Wireless adaptor via a GUI now take longer?

    Windows 7,

    Click Wireless icon by clock, click "open network and sharing centre" , then click "Wireless Network Connection"

    Windows XP,

    Double click wireless icon, then click details tab.
    Globe -> Ip address (choose the only option) -> right click on a connection and choose Status.

    This is why my head hurts running Windows 7, things take longer, and have been moved not to make it quicker to get too, but to take it longer to get too! I wish i could have a few hours with the Vista/7 team, i have a few choice words for them!

    Now Office 2010, i love that, that is change for the better.
    Most things are quicker to find, as you simply use the globe search box to do it.

  11. #41

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    London
    Posts
    3,159
    Thank Post
    116
    Thanked 529 Times in 452 Posts
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    125
    Quote Originally Posted by Quackers View Post
    OK, i am back on my Windows 7 laptop at the moment, and i am getting wound up.
    Can't help with the libraries stuff but for the other things you just need to get used to the Windows 7 way of working - press the Windows key and type what you want to do!
    eg: <Windows> rename - first option it finds is "rename this computer
    <windows> IP - first option is view network connections; open that and look at the properties of the connection you want.

    It is different but it's consistent - most things you're going to want to do are now searchable and that just wasn't there in XP. I now really, really miss that if I use an XP machine!

  12. #42


    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    51.403651, -0.515458
    Posts
    9,808
    Thank Post
    262
    Thanked 2,969 Times in 2,183 Posts
    Rep Power
    847
    Quote Originally Posted by mac_shinobi View Post
    1. Snow leopards update from Leopard was a half way house between an upgrade and an update
    A bit like Vista. If you think about it, Microsoft did exactly this. They added the foundations to Vista and built upon these to make Windows 7 even better.

    Quote Originally Posted by mac_shinobi View Post
    In the same way that if you originally purchased a 32 bit version of windows, you don't get the 64 bit version for £25 afaik you have to fork out the full amount for the 64 bit version of said operating system
    If you buy a retail copy of Windows 7 your product key will work with both the 32-bit and 64-bit versions. With an OEM copy of Windows, this is not possible. You either buy the 32-bit version or the 64-bit version. This is why the latter is cheaper (£111 vs £78). If you buy a PC from an OEM such as Dell or HP there is a way to switch between the x86 and x64 editions, but technically it wouldn't be legal.

    Quote Originally Posted by mac_shinobi View Post
    2. I think office 2007 is not great in comparison to 2003 and also that most people still use 2003 so easier to stay with 2003 and I didn't really get on with office 2007
    I'm the opposite. I really like Office 2010 (and 2007 before it) because I can do things a lot faster compared to in 2003. Saving documents in the new file format also means they take up less space on your HDD because everything gets zipped up.

    Quote Originally Posted by mac_shinobi View Post
    with it being a UK version of windows 7 obviously make the default keyboard layout UK Great Britain
    I would like to see Microsoft create a UK language pack for Windows since there's already one for Welsh. Perhaps with Windows 8, Microsoft can use the location sensors feature from Windows 7 to detect where you are via geo-location and set your keyboard layout (and other settings) appropriately.

    Quote Originally Posted by mac_shinobi View Post
    3. if you want it, then add it on, if not then its not taking up space on your hard drive.
    I can see what you're getting at, but having nice new features which are disabled by default doesn't make a whole lot of sense and it would totally confuse most normal computer users. It would also be incredibly annoying if you had to spend a lot of time making it look and function how it should do in the first place. Apple isn't any different to Microsoft in this respect. When you buy a new Mac, you get iLife pre-installed whether you like it or not which takes up approx. 4GB of disk space. Linux is the almost the same. If you download Ubuntu you get OpenOffice bundled with it.

    If the extra features didn't take up any disk space on your HDD, you would either have to keep inserting the disc every time you wanted to add something or download them from the Internet (like Apple do with printer drivers in Snow Leopard and Microsoft do with Language Packs in Vista and 7). One of the annoying things with XP, is having to insert the disc when you want to enable an extra feature. Although you could copy the contents of the XP disc to your HDD, you have then done the exact opposite to what you wanted to do in the first place (i.e. save disk space).

    Quote Originally Posted by mac_shinobi View Post
    The same with the GUI make the classic one the default so as not to use resources and if people want the extra flashy GUI then they can add it and apply it.
    Leaving Aero enabled actually improves performance because your CPU has less work to do...

    Aero utilizes the graphics processor in your video card to composite and render the display. This design leads to two main advantages over the other Vista interfaces. First, the display is more reliable and seamless, with none of the weird tearing effects that can mar the other interfaces. Second, by offloading the display from the system microprocessor to the GPU, Windows Aero frees the microprocessor to perform other tasks, leading to better overall performance.

    Quote Originally Posted by mac_shinobi View Post
    Not really used windows 7 that much to be honest but just to get an idea how much space capacity wise does a base default install take up ?? I think ( could be wrong as haven't installed snow leopard for a long time ) takes up around 11gb ( give or take a few gigs )
    A base install of Windows 7 Ultimate (x86) with all of the latest updates installed comes to 7.3GB. Likewise, Windows XP Pro SP3 is around 4.5GB. Not a huge difference between them really, so I wouldn't call 7 bloated at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by mac_shinobi View Post
    Also with reference to your capacity statements - just because windows 7 is released does not mean everyone will run out and upgrade current hardware ie hard drive to a larger capacity.
    That's true. Most people don't install operating systems themselves or even upgrade their own HDDs. They usually choose to buy a new computer with the latest OS already loaded. I think a better example would be to say that HDDs have increased in capacity by 3313%, while Windows 7 only uses 62% more disk space compared to XP! I honestly don't think most people care how much disk space their OS uses. They just accept it.

    Quote Originally Posted by mac_shinobi View Post
    I would prefer if they did what Apple did, just have one disc for the OS
    Me too. I don't see Microsoft ever doing this because they wouldn't make as much money. Why sell one version when not everyone needs things like Remote Desktop or BitLocker? From a business perspective it makes perfect sense to do this. From a users perspective, it's annoying. One good thing about Windows 7 (and Vista) is that you can easily make a single disc which includes every edition (inc. Enterprise) for both the 32-bit and 64-bit versions. If you wanted to, you could even create a USB flash drive which contained both Vista and 7.

    Quote Originally Posted by mac_shinobi View Post
    4. Could be wrong on your blu ray point ref xp - I was under the impression it was down to all the hardware supporting HDCP although there is the work around of using SlySoft AnyDVD HD
    Yes. Everything needs to support HDCP, from the graphics card and monitor to the OS and playback software. AnyDVD HD can be used to strip away the DRM, but it's not exactly legal in the UK.

  13. #43


    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    51.403651, -0.515458
    Posts
    9,808
    Thank Post
    262
    Thanked 2,969 Times in 2,183 Posts
    Rep Power
    847
    Quote Originally Posted by srochford View Post
    Most things you're going to want to do are now searchable and that just wasn't there in XP. I now really, really miss that if I use an XP machine!
    I love the search feature. You can even misspell things too. e.g. Windows Key + Pritn

  14. #44

    mac_shinobi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    10,053
    Thank Post
    3,585
    Thanked 1,123 Times in 1,025 Posts
    Rep Power
    377
    Quote Originally Posted by Arthur View Post
    A bit like Vista. If you think about it, Microsoft did exactly this. They added the foundations to Vista and built upon these to make Windows 7 even better.


    >If you buy a retail copy of Windows 7 your product key will work with both the 32-bit and 64-bit versions. With an OEM copy of Windows, this is not possible. You either buy the >32-bit version or the 64-bit version. This is why the latter is cheaper (£111 vs £78). If you buy a PC from an OEM such as Dell or HP there is a >way to switch between the x86 and x64 editions, but technically it wouldn't be legal.


    >> I'm the opposite. I really like Office 2010 (and 2007 before it) because I can do things a lot faster compared to in 2003. Saving documents in the new file format also >> means they take up less space on your HDD because everything gets zipped up.


    >I would like to see Microsoft create a UK language pack for Windows since there's already one for >Welsh. Perhaps with Windows 8, Microsoft can use the location sensors feature from Windows 7 to detect where you are via >geo-location and set your keyboard layout (and other settings) appropriately.


    >I can see what you're getting at, but having nice new features which are disabled by default doesn't make a whole lot of sense and it would totally confuse most normal computer >users. It would also be incredibly annoying if you had to spend a lot of time making it look and function how it should do in the first place. Apple isn't any different to Microsoft in >this respect. When you buy a new Mac, you get iLife pre-installed whether you like it or not which takes up approx. 4GB of disk space. Linux is the almost the same. If you download Ubuntu you get OpenOffice bundled with it.

    If the extra features didn't take up any disk space on your HDD, you would either have to keep inserting the disc every time you wanted to add something or download them from the Internet (like Apple do with printer drivers in Snow Leopard and Microsoft do with Language Packs in Vista and 7). One of the annoying things with XP, is having to insert the disc when you want to enable an extra feature. Although you could copy the contents of the XP disc to your HDD, you have then done the exact opposite to what you wanted to do in the first place (i.e. save disk space).


    >> Leaving Aero enabled actually improves performance because your CPU has less work to do...





    A base install of Windows 7 Ultimate (x86) with all of the latest updates installed comes to 7.3GB. Likewise, Windows XP Pro SP3 is around 4.5GB. Not a huge difference between them really, so I wouldn't call 7 bloated at all.


    That's true. Most people don't install operating systems themselves or even upgrade their own HDDs. They usually choose to buy a new computer with the latest OS already loaded. I think a better example would be to say that HDDs have increased in capacity by 3313%, while Windows 7 only uses 62% more disk space compared to XP! I honestly don't think most people care how much disk space their OS uses. They just accept it.


    Me too. I don't see Microsoft ever doing this because they wouldn't make as much money. Why sell one version when not everyone needs things like Remote Desktop or BitLocker? From a business perspective it makes perfect sense to do this. From a users perspective, it's annoying. One good thing about Windows 7 (and Vista) is that you can easily make a single disc which includes every edition (inc. Enterprise) for both the 32-bit and 64-bit versions. If you wanted to, you could even create a USB flash drive which contained both Vista and 7.


    Yes. Everything needs to support HDCP, from the graphics card and monitor to the OS and playback software. AnyDVD HD can be used to strip away the DRM, but it's not exactly legal in the UK.
    1. On apple it is just one disc and with regards to installing on other macs may or may not work due to the way they match it up to the hardware with ref to drivers and type of hardware you purchased it for ref when you get the installation disc with say a Mac Pro ( The tower ) and another installation disc with the mac book ( pro ) afaik and I have not tested it you cant for example use the installation disc from the mac book ( pro ) and install OS X on the Mac Pro ( Tower ), at least thats what I have gathered, as said earlier I have not tested this so could be wrong.

    I have also not really looked into spec wise of the newest apple range with regards to the processor line but with snow leopard being 64 bit I am guessing the processors must support 64 bit so don't think aside from some of the actual software being 32 bit the OS provides backward compatibility for 32 bit applications but runs in 64 bit

    As they have removed PPC support from snow leopard onwards this should make it a bit easier for apple ref pushing out the new operating systems as I am hoping 32 bit apps will be phased out and it will be purely 64 bit ( both os and applications )

    2. with regards to your comment about when you get a mac you get iLife etc installed that is the image you get from factory if you want to call it that, I always fully format and go through the installation process myself so I get rid of every language ( chinese, japense, russian, etc ), all the printer drivers ( because I don't own every printer in existance ) and if I do purchase a printer I will install only the relevant driver myself and if there are any software updates that relate to helping then I install those, I do install iLife again as nice to be able to use iMovie and other iLife apps now and again

    3. Fair enough ref taking the load of your actual cpu's and loading it onto your GPU but to run Aero requires at least in vista a heck of a lot of GPU power ( only exclusion that I am aware of is the mac mini's because when vista was released I know quite a few people who had mac minis and aero ran on the mac minis fine - go figure ). I am pretty sure that the effects such as expose and other ones that apple use does not use as much GPU power as aero ( need to google that to confirm that though ) but I had a G4 power book and also an iBook at work that can still do expose and all the other stuff without any hitches and they don't exactly have an ATI 5870 or a GTX 4XX gfx card in them.

    4. In respect to the installation discs or amount of them - they should do a business version and a home / personal version ( 2 editions of the personal or home version ) ie one for pc enthusiasts that includes stuff such as bit locker and all the useful stuff and then a normal home version ( that can't be joined or used on a domain, does not have bit locker and all the business side of things ) and hence make this cheaper.

    That way if you work in IT and want all the goodies for home use ( for yourself ) then you buy the pc / personal version and if you are a normal user then just the home version and in the same way if you are a business then you just purchase a volume license or as many required licenses for the business version.

    5. fair enough reference not legal in the UK ref slysoft any dvd - If I was to use sly soft any dvd ( hd ) then it would only purely be to playback blu ray movies not to copy / re sell or anything like that and I am not saying that makes it legal as it does not but they should at least have the fair use act or something like that or make a patch for xp to allow blu ray playback for those of us who want to stick with xp for the time being and who have a blu ray drive ( personally I don't as I have a PS 3 and that plays my blu ray movies back )

    You are correct reference the OS supporting it because when I was looking at adding a cheaper blu ray drive ( LG ) to my Mac Pro, Leopard and Snow Leopard did not support it and I was contemplating to bootcamp windows for blu ray playback ( which ever version of windows whether it be xp, vista or whatever ) but without being able to test it and see if it worked etc I went with the PS 3 option as it just made my life a lot easier and also meant I could play games on the PS 3 as well as having a blu ray player.

    I still think windows is behind on the search feature - not got windows 7 so not tried it but I know spot light is pretty darned quick, If I re call correctly I think windows vista or 7 was going to include some sort of SQL database to index all your files on your filing system but they scrapped that - not sure if windows 7 does anything like that, I know xp had a service that ran in the background but personally I think that was a flakey approach

  15. #45
    Quackers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,450
    Thank Post
    45
    Thanked 160 Times in 135 Posts
    Rep Power
    57
    Quote Originally Posted by localzuk View Post
    Right click on it and view the properties - each library allows you to specify what gets listed.
    Cannot do that, as that only effects me. I need the default to be this for EVERYONE.



SHARE:
+ Post New Thread
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Oh that's just great ...
    By leco in forum General Chat
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 13th April 2010, 05:18 PM
  2. [Video] Great NZ Ad about Broadband
    By SYNACK in forum Jokes/Interweb Things
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 1st March 2010, 04:36 PM

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •