+ Post New Thread
Results 1 to 8 of 8
Our Advertisers Thread, ICT Reviews Recommended for VeryPC Nano Silent in Purchasing and Trading; ...
  1. #1
    VeryPC_Tom_B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Sheffield
    Posts
    49
    Thank Post
    64
    Thanked 24 Times in 16 Posts
    Rep Power
    8

    ICT Reviews Recommended for VeryPC Nano Silent

    Hi everyone.

    VeryPC recently acheived an ICT Reviews Recommended status for our new Nano Silent mini PC from the PC Pro sister publication. They said lots of nice things about our tiny fanless Intel® Core™ i3/i5 VESA mountable PC like:
    Quote Originally Posted by ICT Reviews
    • This isn't just a silent, miniature marvel, but one of the most robust and efficient schools PCs we've seen, so is highly recommended.
    • When VeryPC calls its desktop PC the Nano Silent, it really isn't joking.
    • ...you wouldn’t even notice it was on if it weren't for the bright, blue LED on the front of the unit...
    Since ICT Reviews is a print only publication sent out to UK education Network Managers and has no digital version or online presence, we thought we'd share the article here so anyone who has not had a chance to read it can do so.

    ICT-Reviews-May-2014-Nano-Silent-Review.jpg

    Quote Originally Posted by ICT Reviews
    A versatile, silent and extremely compact PC that still has enough power for most classroom applications

    When VeryPC calls its desktop PC the Nano Silent, it really isn't joking. Based on Intel's NUC technology, it's a tiny system with a desktop footprint of 150mm by 170mm, and just 47mm high. It's not significantly larger than the average hardback book, though you'll need a little space for the compact power supply. And as for the silent bit? Well, with passive cooling through the fins on the aluminium case, you wouldn’t even notice it was on if it weren't for the bright, blue LED on the front of the unit.

    That aluminium casing also makes it a solid, compact PC, with very little that even the clumsiest student has a chance of breaking or interfering with. Of course, at this size, the bigger worry might be theft, but there's a Kensington lock point to make that awkward. Plus, if you don't want to leave the Nano Silent sitting on the desk, you can easily attach it to the back of a monitor through a standard VESA mount.

    Internally, it's very neatly put together, although the size of the case means there's little room for any expansion. You can replace the 120GB SSD or add another 8GB of RAM to the 8GB already fitted, but that's about it.

    You also can't expect a huge range of ports and sockets, but the Nano Silent has all the basics covered, with two USB 3 ports and a headphone output at the front, and two more USB 3 ports, Gigabit Ethernet, mini-HDMI and mini-DisplayPort outputs at the rear. There's no built-in Wi-Fi, but VeryPC wins brownie points for including a mini-HDMI-to-HDMI cable in the box; a good move given that many schools won't have one handy.

    The one area where the Nano Silent compromises is performance. It's not slow, by any means. The Core i5-4250U dual-core processor can turbo-boost from 1.3GHz up to 2.6GHz, and with the RAM and the SSD it feels extremely nippy in everyday tasks. The Haswell processor's Intel HD 5000 graphics GPU can also cope with more demanding 3D applications. However, the system struggles when it comes to really demanding, processor-intensive media manipulation tasks, and that's reflected in a slightly disappointing PC Pro benchmark score of 0.69. Still, if you're not looking for a media-editing powerhouse, the Nano Silent has you more than covered.

    Throw in Windows 8.1 Professional and a five-year on-site warranty, and the Nano Silent is also great value for money. The price might put it over the budget of some schools, but Core i3 versions are available if you want to trim a little off the cost. This isn't just a silent, miniature marvel, but one of the most robust and efficient schools PCs we've seen, so is highly recommended.

    Nano Silent has an anodised aluminium chassis which means we can laser etch your branding onto it, or make custom metal badges if you prefer.

    Thanks for reading folks!

    Tom

  2. 3 Thanks to VeryPC_Tom_B:

    hallb15 (24th June 2014), StevieM (23rd June 2014), VeryPC_Colin_M (23rd June 2014)

  3. #2

    StevieM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Liverpool
    Posts
    870
    Thank Post
    344
    Thanked 374 Times in 251 Posts
    Rep Power
    112
    Yaaay! Congrats guys and gals.

  4. #3

    nephilim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Dunstable
    Posts
    12,080
    Thank Post
    1,637
    Thanked 1,956 Times in 1,431 Posts
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    440
    I have a couple of questions.

    How does it dissipate heat without the fans? I know you can have heatsinks etc, but surely they'd get hot as well.

  5. #4
    Norphy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Harpenden
    Posts
    2,383
    Thank Post
    54
    Thanked 315 Times in 245 Posts
    Blog Entries
    6
    Rep Power
    120
    This is just an semi-educated guess but it looks to me that the entire box is designed to be a radiator. They must use low power mobile chips and some kind of heatpipe system to distribute the heat.

  6. 2 Thanks to Norphy:

    nephilim (24th June 2014), VeryPC (24th June 2014)

  7. #5

    VeryPC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Sheffield
    Posts
    2,050
    Thank Post
    1,128
    Thanked 1,033 Times in 595 Posts
    Rep Power
    329
    ▲ @nephilim Heatsink to conduct heat away from CPU coupled with chassis fins to radiate away excess heat. Naturally the chassis temperature will increase slightly, but good heat management coupled with an ultra energy efficient CPU means silent fanless computing at very comfortable operating temperatures. See this helpful diagram! ▼



    Al

    EDIT - Yes @Norphy yes! You are a stone cold educated guessing genius my friend.
    Last edited by VeryPC; 24th June 2014 at 09:19 AM.

  8. Thanks to VeryPC from:

    nephilim (24th June 2014)

  9. #6
    Norphy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Harpenden
    Posts
    2,383
    Thank Post
    54
    Thanked 315 Times in 245 Posts
    Blog Entries
    6
    Rep Power
    120
    Does that mean that there is a recommended way to mount the chassis? It looks like it would work better on its base than on its side or mounted to a monitor. Do you need to make sure there is good airflow around where it is, do you have recommendations about the space required around it?
    Last edited by Norphy; 24th June 2014 at 09:29 AM.

  10. #7
    hallb15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Leeds
    Posts
    407
    Thank Post
    463
    Thanked 233 Times in 151 Posts
    Rep Power
    74

    Cool

    I've mounted ours to the wall - it hasn't suffered any heat problems yet...
    I've had to stick some blutack over the blue power LED though as it is so bright it lights up the wall!
    Oh and it has Wifi. You can add it, its an extra in the VeryPC shop.
    PM me if you want to ask any questions about it.
    Last edited by hallb15; 24th June 2014 at 11:39 AM.

  11. 2 Thanks to hallb15:

    VeryPC (24th June 2014), VeryPC_Tom_B (24th June 2014)

  12. #8

    VeryPC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Sheffield
    Posts
    2,050
    Thank Post
    1,128
    Thanked 1,033 Times in 595 Posts
    Rep Power
    329
    Quote Originally Posted by Norphy View Post
    Does that mean that there is a recommended way to mount the chassis? It looks like it would work better on its base than on its side or mounted to a monitor. Do you need to make sure there is good airflow around where it is, do you have recommendations about the space required around it?
    As long as there are a few centimetres of space around the three sides with the fins so the excess heat (which is minimal - the CPU has a TDP of only 15 watts) can flow away you'll be fine. Stood on desk, mounted to monitor or wall or whatever will all be okay.

    Al

  13. Thanks to VeryPC from:

    Norphy (24th June 2014)

SHARE:
+ Post New Thread

Similar Threads

  1. [Review] VeryPC Nano Sketch
    By zag in forum Hardware
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 7th May 2014, 03:50 PM
  2. Replies: 389
    Last Post: 11th March 2014, 09:59 AM
  3. PC Pro's ICT Reviews for schools
    By Diello in forum General Chat
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 20th January 2011, 02:08 PM
  4. Recommendations for a school web site system?
    By OverWorked in forum Web Development
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 26th June 2006, 02:46 PM
  5. Any recommendations for music system for school hall? Help!
    By kfq61 in forum Recommended Suppliers
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 13th June 2006, 08:02 PM

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •