+ Post New Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 26
IT News Thread, Intel's 'Haswell' CPUs could be the last interchangeable desktop processor in Other News; ...
  1. #1


    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    51.403651, -0.515458
    Posts
    9,163
    Thank Post
    234
    Thanked 2,744 Times in 2,022 Posts
    Rep Power
    801

    Intel's 'Haswell' CPUs could be the last interchangeable desktop processor

    According to rumour below, many of Intel's fifth-gen Core processors due to be released in 2014 will be soldered to motherboards - just like Atom and mobile processors are today. Since most schools typically buy low-to-mid range Celeron/Pentium/Core i3-based PCs, this means that in order to upgrade the processor you will have to buy a brand new motherboard. While not many upgrade processors in old desktop PCs, you will have to throw away a perfectly good CPU if the motherboard dies outside of its warranty period.

    As personal computers become smaller, their flexibility is decreasing. According to a media report, starting from the Broadwell generation of processors, Intel Corp. will only offer mainstream desktop chips in BGA packaging, which will eliminate upgrade options as well as increase risks for PC makers.

    According to the Japanese PC Watch web-site, Haswell microprocessors may be the last desktop chips in LGA packaging, which enables easy switching of CPUs on mainboards. Starting from the Broadwell chips, which are due in 2014, all mainstream desktop processors will be available in BGA packaging, which means that they will have to be soldered to mainboards, something that can be done in relatively sophisticated manufacturing facilities.

    The BGA MCMs should provide advantages to makers of high-performance tablets, ultra-thin notebooks as well as all-in-one desktops as ball grid array packaging ensure small footprint. However, when it comes to fully-fledged desktops, BGA means that system makers will have to keep a large amount of different mainboards with various features and dissimilar microprocessors in order to provide the right choices for their clients. Such stockpiling increases business risks to smaller makers and decreases abilities to differentiate for mainboard makers.

    While mainstream chips will reportedly be only supplied in BGA form-factors soldered to mainboards, which eliminates upgrade possibility, it is likely that high-end desktop (HEDT) platforms will still be supplied in LGA packaging. What remains to be seen is how expensive will such chips be. For example, at present the most affordable LGA2011 HEDT chip costs $294, whereas the most expensive performance-mainstream LGA1155 processor costs $332. In case upgradeable platforms remain on the HEDT’s price levels of today, that will essentially mean the end of upgrades of the mainstream PCs. (Source)

  2. #2
    jamesfed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Reading
    Posts
    2,208
    Thank Post
    137
    Thanked 345 Times in 291 Posts
    Rep Power
    87
    Could strengthen AMDs position as far as CPU sockets go - right now its a matter of AM3+ for traditional CPUs (which is largely compatible with AM3 a design from 2009!) and FM2 for the latest Fusion APUs (although it was a pain them ditching FM1 so soon!).

    Compare this to the massive number of Intel Sockets since 2009 (a quick Google says its 5) and especially if this soldering goes ahead...

  3. #3

    synaesthesia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Northamptonshire
    Posts
    6,134
    Thank Post
    598
    Thanked 1,062 Times in 817 Posts
    Blog Entries
    15
    Rep Power
    473
    I do somehow doubt it will come to fruition but Intel could probably easily do without the enthusiast market. Would be a great shame, but a first step towards my premonitions

  4. #4


    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Leeds
    Posts
    6,708
    Thank Post
    229
    Thanked 870 Times in 747 Posts
    Rep Power
    298
    Quote Originally Posted by synaesthesia View Post
    I do somehow doubt it will come to fruition but Intel could probably easily do without the enthusiast market. Would be a great shame, but a first step towards my premonitions
    why i bet vast majority of pcs are hp/acer/dell boxes that are never opened once bought

  5. #5

    FN-GM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    16,104
    Thank Post
    891
    Thanked 1,752 Times in 1,511 Posts
    Blog Entries
    12
    Rep Power
    457
    Wouldn't really bother me. Never upgraded one to be honest. With the whole fleet of machines under warranty replacement boards are not problem.

    Would it mean that the actual motherboards are made by intel?

    If they do this trick with the RAM that would be a loss to me.

  6. #6

    3s-gtech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Wales
    Posts
    2,841
    Thank Post
    148
    Thanked 577 Times in 521 Posts
    Rep Power
    155
    Won't make a huge amount of difference to my work PCs - especially as we are behind the curve as we buy recon (mostly Intel) - but it would solidify my choice to stick with AMD for home and one-off builds. I like swapping bits out, meaning I can upgrade one part at a time as I can afford it. I just have to take a big hit in performance due to the brand!

  7. #7
    flyinghaggis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,036
    Thank Post
    104
    Thanked 76 Times in 59 Posts
    Rep Power
    116
    Seems a shame but to be honest it's virtually never worth bothering to upgrade CPU's anyway. Typically the largest performance jump you can get is around 20-30% which is rarely enough difference to justify the effort/cost of changing the CPU. In my experience if you're going to buy a new CPU you typically always need a new motherboard/RAM to go with it anyway.

    For example take my current situation. I have an original first gen core i7-920 (socket 1336) and there's no CPU that would make a substantial difference without changing the socket type which instantly means a new motherboard. Even if I could source an i7-980x it's likely it would be cheaper and faster to just buy a new ivy bridge mobo and CPU.

  8. #8


    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    8,202
    Thank Post
    442
    Thanked 1,032 Times in 812 Posts
    Rep Power
    339
    changing a cpu in 800 machines is a PITA.
    This will affect home users, but nobody else.

  9. #9

    synaesthesia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Northamptonshire
    Posts
    6,134
    Thank Post
    598
    Thanked 1,062 Times in 817 Posts
    Blog Entries
    15
    Rep Power
    473
    Dunno, changing semprons to athlon X3's in many of our desktops made a *huge* difference - nearly as much as changing IDE drives to SATA. Sometimes machines need repurposing and a CPU upgrade will aide that just fine.
    Like I said though, I don't see it happening - or it'll be an option.

  10. #10

    SYNACK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    11,205
    Thank Post
    876
    Thanked 2,729 Times in 2,308 Posts
    Blog Entries
    11
    Rep Power
    782
    Yea, this will effect schools on the edge a bit more down the line as they are the ones who have to scrape working machines out of the detritus that is left over after several years of use, this just makes even less parts replaceable and recoverable. You can guarantee that the price won't go down at all or anywhere near as much as the decrease in utility for that kind of usage.

  11. #11
    dgsmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Merseyside, England
    Posts
    1,108
    Thank Post
    119
    Thanked 90 Times in 78 Posts
    Rep Power
    37
    Bad idea - we have upgraded some of our 5yr old core 2 machines with better CPUs as these are now more cheaply available 2nd hand. What I don't get is, should the change go ahead, would it just affect brand-name OEM machines (HP, Dell, Lenovo etc) or even system builders like RM, Stone etc?

  12. #12

    localzuk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Minehead
    Posts
    17,966
    Thank Post
    519
    Thanked 2,503 Times in 1,943 Posts
    Blog Entries
    24
    Rep Power
    841
    This will affect hobbyists, and organisations who make do. We get machines with 3 year warranties, and mostly they get replaced after those 3 years, but many places can't do this. So, they have to repair what they've got. So, this will go from replacing a motherboard which goes pop for £60 to replacing a motherboard and CPU for £250. Not exactly the best news for them!

  13. #13


    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    51.403651, -0.515458
    Posts
    9,163
    Thank Post
    234
    Thanked 2,744 Times in 2,022 Posts
    Rep Power
    801
    Quote Originally Posted by jamesfed View Post
    Could strengthen AMDs position as far as CPU sockets go
    Either that or AMD will be bankrupt by 2014. I hope not since Intel needs the competition to keep them honest.

    Quote Originally Posted by jamesfed View Post
    Compare this to the massive number of Intel Sockets since 2009 (a quick Google says its 5)
    There has only really been two Intel socket changes since 2009: LGA 1156 (Clarkdale/Lynnfield) and 1155 (Sandy/Ivy Bridge). Haswell will be the third next year with LGA 1150.

    LGA 1366 and 2011 were for high-end desktops/workstations and enthusiasts with too much money, so don't really count.

    Quote Originally Posted by localzuk View Post
    this will go from replacing a motherboard which goes pop for £60 to replacing a motherboard and CPU for £250.
    You may have to add DDR4 RAM to the shopping list since this is what motherboards will use from 2015/2016 onwards. If it ends up costing £300+ to replace a faulty Core i3 motherboard that originally came with DDR3 RAM, I reckon most people would rather buy a new computer.

    Quote Originally Posted by dgsmith View Post
    would it just affect brand-name OEM machines (HP, Dell, Lenovo etc) or even system builders like RM, Stone etc?
    It would affect system builders too since they will be using the same Intel CPUs as the big OEMs. Asus, Gigabyte and MSI (for example) would solder the processors to the motherboards at their factory and then supply these to RM, Stone etc.

    I doubt Intel will solder Core i5's and i7's to motherboards, so you would be fine if you bought PCs with these processors.
    Last edited by Arthur; 25th November 2012 at 12:49 PM.

  14. #14
    flyinghaggis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,036
    Thank Post
    104
    Thanked 76 Times in 59 Posts
    Rep Power
    116
    Quote Originally Posted by localzuk View Post
    So, this will go from replacing a motherboard which goes pop for £60 to replacing a motherboard and CPU for £250. Not exactly the best news for them!
    That's a good point actually. It's quite common to get a faulty motherboard (given most now have onboard audio/video/NIC/everything). It would be pretty annoying if you stumped up £200 for a top end CPU and you had to chuck it because the motherboard failed a year or two down the line.

    Having said that I suppose it does make sense as desktops are increasingly being edged out in favour of tablets and laptops.
    Last edited by flyinghaggis; 25th November 2012 at 12:29 PM.

  15. #15

    glennda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Sussex
    Posts
    7,817
    Thank Post
    272
    Thanked 1,138 Times in 1,034 Posts
    Rep Power
    350
    Personally i think this makes sense for laptops and such like but for desktops etc could be a pita.

    They better not go down the apple route and solder Ram to the motherboard.

SHARE:
+ Post New Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Could this be the End?
    By aerospacemango in forum General Chat
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 7th August 2012, 10:57 AM
  2. Replies: 11
    Last Post: 19th November 2010, 03:20 PM
  3. what could be causeing this?
    By e_g_r in forum Wireless Networks
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 27th September 2006, 03:12 PM

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •