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New Project Ideas Thread, Mobile Phones in the classroom in EduGeek Projects; Are you a teacher / IT Manager in a school? This article is defiantly worth a look..... Let me know ...
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    Mobile Phones in the classroom

    Are you a teacher / IT Manager in a school? This article is defiantly worth a look..... Let me know what you think http://lnkd.in/aZdvuV

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    Once you get past the basics there's no point learning "stuff", you just need to know that there's probably a solution, and how to find it. So the current education system is mostly redundant.

    So you switch to cooperation, class/groups being asked to solve a problem, but then you need a new system for grading, best thing I've seen is something like slashdot's. Vote up/down your peers' contributions, meta vote on other people's votes. Have to be careful to avoid groupthink though, so a new job for the teacher is to watch for this and point it out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mavhc View Post
    Once you get past the basics there's no point learning "stuff", you just need to know that there's probably a solution, and how to find it. So the current education system is mostly redundant.

    So you switch to cooperation, class/groups being asked to solve a problem, but then you need a new system for grading, best thing I've seen is something like slashdot's. Vote up/down your peers' contributions, meta vote on other people's votes. Have to be careful to avoid groupthink though, so a new job for the teacher is to watch for this and point it out.
    Slashdot is concentrated groupthink, it is a standing wave of conformity to the average viewpoint of the contributors. What you need it a problem / solution model where solutions are rewarded regardless of the politics.

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    For anyone working in a school looking to introduce mobile phones into the classroom, please see this:

    http://www.middlewichhigh.cheshire.s.../59/161489.pdf

    I know it's a lot to read but it does highlight some legal issues in this regard. Please PM me for the context of this if you are unsure. Any comments are welcome too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ephelyon View Post
    For anyone working in a school looking to introduce mobile phones into the classroom, please see this:

    http://www.middlewichhigh.cheshire.s.../59/161489.pdf

    I know it's a lot to read but it does highlight some legal issues in this regard. Please PM me for the context of this if you are unsure. Any comments are welcome too.
    Haven't had a chance to read all the comments, just the main part. But at the end of the day doesn't it come back to "limiting" risks.

    There will never be a 100% safe solution to BYOD, nor even with standard computers within classrooms. There will always be ways to bully etc.

    I'm sure everyone knows that before mobile phones etc it was just written on paper and passed around etc etc. Same with the rude images part, people used to bring in magazines etc

    "Personally" I don't see how allowing kids to use devices within class, and someone gets bullied from it. Or someone sneaking out onto a field and sending a text etc is any different. Both shouldn't happen, whether or not there was a reason to allow the use of the device in the first place.

    It would be like saying, you can't use a ruler because one kid decided to smack another with it.

    End of the day everyone will try to make their workplace as safe as possible for people to use, but there is always risks. If you think it's possible to remove all of the risks there won't be much left inside a classroom

    Steve

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    *Sigh*

    You absolutely will not get the full implications of this until/unless you read the whole thing. The reason I like this debate is because it includes perspectives from a very wide range of people with differing attitudes and approaches.

    This key to the issue is this:

    Do we:
    a) Teach our children at school while protecting them from as much as we can within that context;
    Or b) Protect our children at school while teaching them as much as we can within that context?

    The point of the discussion, when distilled down, is that while ideally we might wish to do a), in fact the current legal climate (Law of Contract, Law of Negligence and H&S Law) mandates that we do b).

    This is not going to change until we can alter the applicable laws to be far more edu-friendly. That, in turn, will not happen until a big enough group of people get behind the issue and force it through to Central Government (Local Authorities can do very little here).

    You're right, Steve - we don't forbid the use of rulers because one child could misuse it to the detriment of another. But, if you read through the whole debate, you'll that that's actually quite a different case. The ruler can only be misused within the sight of the teacher - which is not to say they'll always be looking - but at the end of the day it's possible for that abuse to be intercepted.

    Now consider cyberbullying by text as I refer to it in the debate (in case there's any confusion, I started it). Cyberbullying in a busy BYOD classroom is completely invisible, with abusive and threatening messages of the nature that have caused children to self-harm and kill themselves in the past (please see the Virtual Violence 1 and 2 reports) being sent instantly and untraceably in a flurry of teenage thumbs that would confound a teacher watching from afar to distinguish it from "sanctioned" use of the device. We see then that, in this case, it's entirely IMpossible for the abuse to be intercepted - legally, this is a very different kettle of fish and a massive new problem under current legislation. Essentially, what the law actually says is that, no, this idea of "limiting the risk" that most educators seem to have got into their heads is in fact nowhere near acceptable in some scenarios.

    This is where the legal problem comes in: the only comparable scenario that we can determine is inappropriate notes being passed in class, but even that must be done physically and can be detected and intercepted by the teacher (at least in theory) - so that won't wash.

    So what about when that's not possible? When we knowingly (we would be deemed in law to have known) introduce a technology that, intrinsically and by its very nature, precludes the ability for adequate human or electronic monitoring to take place? In H&S Law this would be referred to as a hazard, and if we knowingly introduce one while KNOWING we can't supervise it effectively we fall foul of the Law of Negligence.

    This is all outlined in the debate. The point is that I can see the educational benefits and I think we will end up using them as a matter of course, but we should only do so ONCE the legal climate is ripe - not before. The debate highlights the areas in which changes would need to be made to support these new high-technology initiatives, which we should do now rather than waiting for the first teacher's career to be destroyed in the process (see in the debate the references to the Art teacher whose career ended after she failed to perceive the danger of thin paintbrushes being used to paint on the floor, with the result that a child was brain-damaged after a brush ended up going through their palate).

    Action is needed now, before a child is damaged and/or a teacher's career is destroyed. For that to happen, we need to start by accepting the situation as it is before we can change it. The debate I have linked to should be read within that context.
    Last edited by Ephelyon; 3rd February 2013 at 09:33 PM.

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    GrumbleDook (3rd February 2013)

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    New thread based on the above started here.

    Updated debate link here.



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