TL;DR. The Corsair Neutron GTX, Samsung 840 Pro and Kingston HyperX 3K are the only drives still going.

Link: http://techreport.com/review/26523/t...-to-a-petabyte

We started with six SSDs: the Corsair Neutron GTX 240GB, Intel 335 Series 240GB, Samsung 840 Series 250GB, Samsung 840 Pro 256GB, and two Kingston HyperX 3K 240GB. They all exceeded their endurance specifications early on, successfully writing hundreds of terabytes without issue. That's a heck of a lot of data, and certainly more than most folks will write in the lifetimes of their drives.

The last time we checked in, the SSDs had just passed the 600TB mark. They were all functional, but the 840 Series was burning through its TLC cells at a steady pace, and even some of the MLC drives were starting to show cracks. We've now written over a petabyte, and only half of the SSDs remain. Three drives failed at different pointsóand in different waysóbefore reaching the 1PB milestone. We've performed autopsies on the casualties and our usual battery of tests on the survivors, and there is much to report.
The petabyte club
As their comrades fell around them, the Corsair Neutron GTX, Samsung 840 Pro, and compressible Kingston HyperX 3K drives soldiered on to 1PB without issue. That's kind of miraculous, really: a bunch of consumer-grade SSDs withstanding one freaking petabyte of writes. None of these drives are rated for more than 200TB.
Given our limited sample size, I wouldn't read too much into exactly how many writes each drive handled. The more important takeaway is that all of the SSDs, including the 840 Series, performed flawlessly through hundreds of terabytes. A typical consumer won't write anything close to that much data over the useful life of a drive.

Even with only six subjects, the fact that we didn't experience any failures until after 700TB is a testament to the endurance of modern SSDs. So is the fact that three of our subjects have now written over a petabyte. That's an astounding total for consumer-grade drives, and the Corsair Neutron GTX, Samsung 840 Pro, and compressible Kingston HyperX 3K are still going!