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How do you do....it? Thread, nas server setup in Technical; Hi gang, I'm setting up a server for kids and staff to store adobe premier and powerpoint files etc hardware: ...
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    PEO
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    nas server setup

    Hi gang, I'm setting up a server for kids and staff to store adobe premier and powerpoint files etc

    hardware:

    2.21Ghz AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual
    2gb RAM
    4 X 256GB SATA DRIVES c: 30Gb partition for server software

    creat each kid a folder with kids having modify and staff read permissions

    thing is, its going to be 1TB storage server which will have no backup. ICT coordinator is fine with that but I would like to set up some sort of redundancy if a drive fails.

    and comments and sugestions much appreciated. cheers

  2. #2
    kerrymoralee9280
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    RAID sounds like the answer to me - You can pick up cheap RAID cards for next to nothing nowadays or even use software to do it for you.

    I would mirror it - Still leaves you half your drive capacity. If this is too little stripe it.

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    PEO (4th April 2008)

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    PEO
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    Quote Originally Posted by kerrymoralee9280 View Post
    RAID sounds like the answer to me - You can pick up cheap RAID cards for next to nothing nowadays or even use software to do it for you.

    I would mirror it - Still leaves you half your drive capacity. If this is too little stripe it.
    yep i was thinking raid. is it possible to get sata controller cards that will support 6 drives? the more drives the better, then i could use raid 5. the mother board has 4 inbuilt sata ports.

    hmm or could i just use the 4 ports on the board pluss the additional sata controller card

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    could buy an external usb and set it to sync data nightly/weekly. unplug it when its not in use. Should protect you from power surges or other power problems that could take out all your hdd's at once.

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    PEO (4th April 2008)

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    kerrymoralee9280
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    Sorry Mr Happy, not sure how many drives you can support with a SATA RAID controller.

    At a guess I would say it is possible to have 6, but I'm no expert...... Anybody else?

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    PeterW's Avatar
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    Never had any real issues with the Adaptec 3805 8 port drive hardware RAID card Adaptec - Adaptec RAID 3805 although they have recently launched a new 5805 model.

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    PEO
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    hmm their are 2 port, 4 port, 8 port.... 8 port sata controler cards cost anything from £250+ christ

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    PEO
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterW View Post
    Never had any real issues with the Adaptec 3805 8 port drive hardware RAID card Adaptec - Adaptec RAID 3805 although they have recently launched a new 5805 model.
    not cheap hu

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    FreeNas will provide you with software RAID.
    in many cases this is better than the cheap fakeraid cards IMO.

    HOWTO: Install FreeNAS - Developer Community

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    Domino's Avatar
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    I'll go with that- freenas is well good.

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    Rather than mirroring. I have been told that the cheaper raid cards are not as good and not as reliable.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FN-Greatermanchester View Post
    Rather than mirroring. I have been told that the cheaper raid cards are not as good and not as reliable.
    The best general puporse RAID cards are those made by LSI logic....oem'ed to the likes of Dell and IBM historically.

    Adaptec aren't bad, but they have had they're fair share of rubbish cards in the past.

    Can't say i've looked too much at the cheap raid cards. You can't go wrong with a good sata controller with a couple of internal channels. The issue will be how many disks you can cram into an offtheshelf pedestal or 5u server. Intel used to do a storage server that they crammed 12 sata disks into. That's not uncommon these days, and you've got a choice of installing WSS, freenas or something vendor specific such as ipstors NSS.

    I'll see if i can dig out the specs on the intel box.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrHappy View Post
    is it possible to get sata controller cards that will support 6 drives?
    Never mind controller cards, you can get motherboards that support 8 on-board SATA ports. As pointed out, FreeNAS (or OpenFiler, or similar) can do software RAID for you without bothering with a RAID card - all your machine is going to be be doing is serving files, the CPU is mostly going to be waiting around for disk I/O, there's nothing better for the processor to do than do RAID calculations. Personally, I'm using Ubuntu server as I also want my machines to run Xen for virtualization. Ubuntu Server now has an install-time option to be set up as a Samba server, and creating a RAID array is a one-line command, dead easy.

    For four disks, RAID 10 might be best - two sets of RAID-1 mirrored drives, then those two sets striped. You'll get redundancy and increased read speed.

    If you're having trouble cramming drives in to your PCs case, something like this might help:

    3.5" Drive Backplane - 3 x SAS/SATA I/II HDD - Black - ICYDOCK Model: MB-453IPF-B - Central Hardware (Powered by CubeCart)

    I've just installed one in our new file server - works a treat (and handles SAS drives if you upgrade in the future).

    If you're considering hardware RAID, you might want to consider an external RAID box. I quite like these ones:

    RAID - Central Hardware (Powered by CubeCart)

    I have a two-disk unit at home which seamlessly handles one disk being yanked out whilst running. Fan noise is quite loud, mind.

    --
    David Hicks
    Last edited by dhicks; 4th April 2008 at 05:54 PM.

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    torledo's Avatar
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    @dhicks...

    can you point me in a direction of a barebones server system that has theese 8 onboard ports. I like the concept, but are you not restricted in terms of what raid levels are available in the software. I see not a lot wrong with raid 10 from a fault tolerance perspective but i thing write performance is going to suck. I suppose it is up to the application as to whethe that is an issue

    Call me old fashioned but i like to have as many spindles as possibe for both performance and fault tolerance, which for me brings up the problem of how many disks a system can accomodate physically.

    That intel box i was talking about does do 12 SATA bit its a little expensive sans disks. I'd rather spend either very little or a lot on a storage system. An in the middle solution price wise like the intel i would try and avoid if at all possible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by torledo View Post
    can you point me in a direction of a barebones server system that has theese 8 onboard ports.
    This post on AVForums has some model numbers. I seem to remember checking the Gigabyte homepage, they have several boards with 8 SATA ports:

    Motherboard with 8 Sata Ports ? - AVForums

    I like the concept, but are you not restricted in terms of what raid levels are available in the software.
    Linux's mdadm will handle RAID levels 0,1,4,5 and 6, and you can use already-created RAID arrays as block devices in further RAID arrays for things like RAID 10, 01 or 50.

    I see not a lot wrong with raid 10 from a fault tolerance perspective but i thing write performance is going to suck.
    What we need is a link to a study somewhere telling us which RAID combination performs best for which operations!

    I figure write speed can be improved with a decent-sized cache - 4GB of RAM is nothing special these days, and should absorb most smaller write operations, which should cover the majority of things the average user does day-to-day (applications like MS Word are written with write performance in mind - Word often only writes the changes to a file back to disk, minimising the amount of data to be written). You're probably correct about write performance once you write enough data in one go to saturate the cache, though - I guess it's then time to get faster hard drives!

    Call me old fashioned but i like to have as many spindles as possibe for both performance and fault tolerance, which for me brings up the problem of how many disks a system can accomodate physically.
    I was hoping for an Antec 900 case and three of those 5-way 3-slot-high hard drive caddies. We had to get new switches instead, though.

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