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Hardware Thread, Rate your SAN in Technical; ...
  1. #16
    Duke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by synaesthesia View Post
    Also very interested in this at the moment, looking for one for the near future. If anyone could give an idea of price also that would be HUGELY appreciated - would rather not have to sit through supplier's waffle whilst they suck in air over their teeth!
    I must has skipped over this post, sorry! Costs will vary anywhere from <£10k to >£100k for the type of system you might see in a school. It all depends on what functionality you want and what level of 'enterprise features' you expect. Best bet would be to start a new thread with your requirements and I'm sure plenty of people will come in with ideas and ballpark figures. I swear, I've spent far too long watching your avatar while I sit here going -_- ^_^ -_- ^_^

  2. #17
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    So, the entry level S7120 is 12TB (12x 1TB drives) but as with all other vendors who recommend a RAID (not stripe) you will never get the full RAW capacity as usable. What RAID level you want / need depends on the business and application need. The good thing with the S7x20 range is that once you buy your chosen box there re no, I repeat, no licences to buy for whatever protocol you intend to use. The box supports compression, think provisioning, de-duplication (at a block level and in-line, not post process like NetApp), NFS, iSCSI, SMB< FC, IB and so on and on and on. It also has analytics - ask on here about how damn good that is - and again included in the cost of the box.

    Chat to some of the guys on here who have used them for feedback - mine tends to be slightly biased as you can appreciate.

    We have some really good Oracle partners who are on here too and they can help you out in terms of configurations and all that stuff. If you have any questions then please do not hesitate to contact me.

    Cheers,

    Phil

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    Eonstor ES S16E-G1240

    Reliability - Very good, not had a single problem due to the device itself.
    Performance - Very good, over 1200 people hammer it daily and file access speeds are pretty good, we were also hosting a load of VMs on it for a while and that worked well, performance was good but for the sake of increasing performance i moved the VMs off it recently.
    Cost - compared to alot of the competition eonstors are pretty cheap, a perfectly good solution for schools as we don't need anything bigger unless we were in a much much bigger school.
    Support - Infortrend have a good support portal and support has been pretty good in the past, not that i've ever needed to use it for anything more than checking on what memory to use for an upgrade to it.

    All in all pretty pleased with it

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    It is a good point that a SAN supplier may give you a good price on the initial purchase but subsequent update can be expensive.

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    Duke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hebdenlad View Post
    It also has analytics - ask on here about how damn good that is - and again included in the cost of the box.
    Very damn good!

    Quote Originally Posted by nicholab
    It is a good point that a SAN supplier may give you a good price on the initial purchase but subsequent update can be expensive.
    *cough*NetApp-warranty-and-licensing-grr-trying-to-build-a-BackBlaze-instead-now*cough*

  6. #21

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    We have a pair of Equallogic SANs, one PS5000 and one PS6000. They're being used for VMware storage and for file server storage.

    has it been reliable
    For the most part, yes. We had an issue with one of them where we had two disk failures more or less at once and we couldn't persuade the array to rebuild (Thank god for RAID 6 + hotspares!). Got around it eventually with the help of Dell tech support.

    We also had difficulty doing a firmware upgrade on one of them, again Dell tech support helped us to resolve the problem

    has it met your requirements for performance and storage
    Yes. They handle the workload put on them with ease.

    was it good value on initial purchase
    Compared with similarly specced EMCs, yes. Still £35k a piece though!

    has support been good if \ when required
    Yes

    would you buy a similar model again?
    Would and in fact are. We have a PS6500 due to us at the end of the week for a new vSphere farm.

  7. #22

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    EMC: Rock solid, sometimes pricey

    Using Clariion from old CX500s thru CX4s, and Celerra/NS NAS. If you demand performance and reliability, I consider them the ones to beat.

    Disclaimer: I moonlight pro bono for education, my day job is in a specialized offshoot of a large financial instution, so I have deep pockets.

    I have mutiple SAN farms in a number of states in the US. Never lost data due to equipment failure. My counterparts in the Windows world just lost (temporarily) 11 TB of data due to Dell MD1000 DAS array failures a month ago. Yes, they had backups, but data were inaccessible until the restores (11 TB worth in small files!) were complete. Very painful and embarassing -- and now that the horse is gone, my boss told me to move their stuff to the SAN and get them out of the storage business

    So reason #1 for a SAN ? Reliability. What you get for the price is redundancy, engineering, and features like scrubbing and performance analysis and improvements.

    2. You get better manageability. I have over 100 servers in a typical site. The question "What's the approximate total storage in site X ?" is answered in minutes or less. That may sound trivial until you need to generate budget numbers quickly because the financial picture just changed. And maintaining 15% headroom means when my boss says "How quickly can we . . . ?" the answer is "Right away." This is also an advantage of NAS appliances.

    3. You get re-use. When a need disappears, circumstances change, or I just plain goofed on the estimate, I can move storage logically thru re-zoning to meet changing conditions. This is also an advantage of NAS appliances, thru different means.

    4. You get portability. If I need to upgrade a Linux server, I provision a new one, and on the appointed day I export the LUNs from one server, import them on the other, and I'm back in business quickly. I could rsync them, to be sure, but that means time spent to do it, sometimes a long time, and also the duplicate disks since the target and destination must be separate. This is also an advantage of NAS appliances.

    5. Fiber channel - you get security. The FC imposes an additional security layer. Our Clariions are only accessible thru the fiber, or thru a security-enabled out-of-band network connection.

    Not all of these apply to schools. In fact, I doubt many schools need more than a well-designed NAS farm. A small Catholic school I know gets along very well with a open-source, linux-based NAS using several nodes. Depends on your size, your appetite, and your need for performance.

    Best of luck

  8. #23

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    I beg to differ regarding filesystem sharing on SAN and NAS. It depends on the filesystem not the storage. Windows volumes on a SAN cannot be seen by more than one server typically. However, using VMware for example - volumes have to be shared so VMs can move around.

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