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Hardware Thread, New Harddrive for Server in Technical; A SAN (Storage Array Network) is one or more disk arrays connected to your servers using fibre or copper cable. ...
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    Re: New Harddrive for Server

    A SAN (Storage Array Network) is one or more disk arrays connected to your servers using fibre or copper cable.

    The disk array(s) don't do anything themselves other than dish out files to the servers at high speed. Your servers are then configured to see bits of the SAN as local volumes - therefore allowing you to store anything you like. One instance that this is great is when dealing with databases (which require block level access - i.e. the disk must be in the machine you are using). Imagine that you have a big database that fills your database servers hard disk. You will have to either replace the drives or the server, which involves huge amounts of work transferring the databse.

    With a SAN, you would just allocate a bit more of your SAN to that virtual volume - no downtime and no faffing about. If you run out of room, add a few more disks.

    A NAS (Networked Attached Storage) is a slimmed-down server that is designed just to dish out files over your network. Cheaper NAS boxes don't intergrate with AD too well so be careful.

    With A NAS you can quickly and relatively easily add a load of storage to your network. You will not be able to gain block-level access and the performance is very much dependant upon the network connection.

    I opted for a SAN to protect my investment and to give me an easier upgrade path - it's connected to 3 servers hosting user files, Exchange and more. I have approx. 1300 users and my storage requirments aren't huge hence why I went for the EMC AX-100 (which uses SATA disks to keep the price down too

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    Re: New Harddrive for Server

    Quote Originally Posted by Ric_
    A SAN (Storage Array Network) is one or more disk arrays connected to your servers using fibre or copper cable.

    The disk array(s) don't do anything themselves other than dish out files to the servers at high speed. Your servers are then configured to see bits of the SAN as local volumes - therefore allowing you to store anything you like. One instance that this is great is when dealing with databases (which require block level access - i.e. the disk must be in the machine you are using). Imagine that you have a big database that fills your database servers hard disk. You will have to either replace the drives or the server, which involves huge amounts of work transferring the databse.

    With a SAN, you would just allocate a bit more of your SAN to that virtual volume - no downtime and no faffing about. If you run out of room, add a few more disks.

    A NAS (Networked Attached Storage) is a slimmed-down server that is designed just to dish out files over your network. Cheaper NAS boxes don't intergrate with AD too well so be careful.

    With A NAS you can quickly and relatively easily add a load of storage to your network. You will not be able to gain block-level access and the performance is very much dependant upon the network connection.

    I opted for a SAN to protect my investment and to give me an easier upgrade path - it's connected to 3 servers hosting user files, Exchange and more. I have approx. 1300 users and my storage requirments aren't huge hence why I went for the EMC AX-100 (which uses SATA disks to keep the price down too
    You can have different raid levels (raid groups) within a san box too, just allocate different disks to seperate raid groups. For example, I have a database raid group, raid 10 and then split the space into several luns. I also have a large raid 5 group split into luns.

    You can also decide which luns to show to which host, so you can keep parts hidden from servers that don't need access (lun masking).

    If you want you can also boot from SAN and have diskless servers.

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    Re: New Harddrive for Server

    Quote Originally Posted by Dos_Box
    'North Yorks LEA do not like SATA'. I'll bet they still love NT 4.0 too.
    I don't think they are NT4 only, but I know they tend to like Intel only workstations, but did not throw a wobbly at my Sempron workstatations, but maybe because my server was Intel that kept them happy. Out of interest, does anybody else use WD Raptors in Server / SANs / NASs and how do you find they perform? I use a Raptor in my desktop at home, and it seems faster than the IDE I had in before.

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    Re: New Harddrive for Server

    My SAN has SATA drives (Maxtor IIRC) and they perform admirally. I'd like to see them turn their noses up at an EMC solution - if EMC can't get it right nobody can!

    The servers in my config also have local storage for the OS and program files - just how I decided to configure it. These disks are 10000rpm SCSI disks - these also perform admirably (strangely enough ).

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    Re: New Harddrive for Server

    Yeah, my view is that the SATA has developed enough now, and as you can get HP entry level servers with SATA drivers rather than SCSI, its clearly been tested enough, so I am "risking it" and the school have said they will go with me (I now hope I am right!)

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    Re: New Harddrive for Server

    FWIW, our student fileserver shares ~300GB of space on sata disks without any problems.

    For the admin network, the new fileserver runs on SCSI drives simply because the last ADMIN fileserver is ~9 yrs old, which is roughly how long the new one will have to last.

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