+ Post New Thread
Page 1 of 6 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 90
Hardware Thread, Building a new SSD based file server in Technical; Our file server is coming up for renewal so I'm going through the plans of building a new one. I ...
  1. #1
    zag
    zag is offline
    zag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,530
    Thank Post
    815
    Thanked 380 Times in 317 Posts
    Blog Entries
    12
    Rep Power
    80

    Building a new SSD based file server

    Our file server is coming up for renewal so I'm going through the plans of building a new one.

    I was thinking one of the new 12th R320 Gen Dell rack servers. 2 x intel 600GB SSD drive and a low power xeon processor.

    What operating system should I use and what features should I use within it?
    Should I hyper-V it?
    Anyone got any thoughts on SSD drives for web servers?

  2. #2
    gshaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    2,604
    Thank Post
    154
    Thanked 205 Times in 190 Posts
    Rep Power
    64
    Interesting, not seen anyone going for SSDs in a file server before. How much are the SSDs, I take it they're the server grade ones not desktop drives?

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    913
    Thank Post
    96
    Thanked 184 Times in 159 Posts
    Rep Power
    53
    QNAP TS-EC1279U-E10G/1.44TB-SSD 1.44TB SSD 10GbE 12.. | Ebuyer.com



    I think I saw an SSD SAN which was 10tb and $100k when we were looking at ours haha

  4. Thanks to RTFM from:

    zag (16th October 2012)

  5. #4
    zag
    zag is offline
    zag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,530
    Thank Post
    815
    Thanked 380 Times in 317 Posts
    Blog Entries
    12
    Rep Power
    80
    Quote Originally Posted by gshaw View Post
    Interesting, not seen anyone going for SSDs in a file server before. How much are the SSDs, I take it they're the server grade ones not desktop drives?
    The 600GB SSDs are £600 each.

    And no they are standard 320 series intel drives. I've been running lots of them and their reliability has been great so far, much better than hard disks. I'm doing this now as the 320's are going out of stock and the new 520s have sandforce controllers which I just don't trust

    The idea of using SSDs would be to speed up user access, backups and hopefully increase reliability as well.

    No one else made the jump yet?

  6. #5

    FN-GM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    15,390
    Thank Post
    797
    Thanked 1,588 Times in 1,391 Posts
    Blog Entries
    10
    Rep Power
    427
    increase reliability as well
    Might not do. SDD have a limit of how many times your can read and write to them. I would have though a file server would hit this limit fast compared to other uses.

  7. #6
    zag
    zag is offline
    zag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,530
    Thank Post
    815
    Thanked 380 Times in 317 Posts
    Blog Entries
    12
    Rep Power
    80
    Quote Originally Posted by FN-GM View Post
    Might not do. SDD have a limit of how many times your can read and write to them. I would have though a file server would hit this limit fast compared to other uses.
    SSD's have longer lifespans that hard disks from my experience (I run over 200 of them in school). Just as an example I've had a webserver running for about a year and a half which gets over 150,000 hits a day. Not one hint of trouble (yet).

    That statement is actually a bit of an old wives tale. I've never had an SSD run out from read/write levels. The vast majority of failures are from the controller. Just ask anyone with a OCZ drive lol
    Last edited by zag; 16th October 2012 at 08:45 AM.

  8. #7

    localzuk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Minehead
    Posts
    17,095
    Thank Post
    511
    Thanked 2,309 Times in 1,785 Posts
    Blog Entries
    24
    Rep Power
    803
    Quote Originally Posted by zag View Post
    The 600GB SSDs are £600 each.

    And no they are standard 320 series intel drives. I've been running lots of them and their reliability has been great so far, much better than hard disks. I'm doing this now as the 320's are going out of stock and the new 520s have sandforce controllers which I just don't trust

    The idea of using SSDs would be to speed up user access, backups and hopefully increase reliability as well.

    No one else made the jump yet?
    Standard drives don't work with RAID properly - RAID stops TRIM working, meaning the drives degrade very quickly. So, you need to get enterprise grade ones.

    We are waiting on a HP Gen8 380 - the storage edition with 25 USFF bays. We are putting 16 x 100GB HP SSDs in and 9 600GB SAS drives.

  9. #8

    glennda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Sussex
    Posts
    7,714
    Thank Post
    269
    Thanked 1,116 Times in 1,012 Posts
    Rep Power
    345
    What connection out the other side are you going to have? Single 1GBE? If so then your going to hit the network limit for before the disks massively.

  10. Thanks to glennda from:

    zag (16th October 2012)

  11. #9
    zag
    zag is offline
    zag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,530
    Thank Post
    815
    Thanked 380 Times in 317 Posts
    Blog Entries
    12
    Rep Power
    80
    I would not use them in RAID.

    As far as I can make out RAID technology was designed to speed up hard disks and prevent complete failures of a single drive. Both of which don't apply to SSD's as much.

    Assuming its a hyper-v machine I would just backup the whole thing very quickly. The backup strategy would obviously have to be much more full-proof but considering a backup will probably take about a third of the time this seems a better option.

    EDIT: Yes the connection would be single gigabit. The fileserver is mainly used for random access of smallish Microsoft office documents. Good point about the bottleneck though, the backup will certainly be effected.
    Last edited by zag; 16th October 2012 at 08:58 AM.

  12. #10

    synaesthesia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Northamptonshire
    Posts
    5,485
    Thank Post
    527
    Thanked 876 Times in 683 Posts
    Blog Entries
    15
    Rep Power
    438
    A trick which is increasingly popular with storage arrays is SSD caching - arrays of mechanical drives providing a hell of a lot of space and a relatively small consumer grade SSD handles cache. This makes a massive improvement to performance in real life terms and the SSD is literally nothing special - the most popular one used by the likes of HP and Dell are Samsung 830s.

  13. #11

    localzuk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Minehead
    Posts
    17,095
    Thank Post
    511
    Thanked 2,309 Times in 1,785 Posts
    Blog Entries
    24
    Rep Power
    803
    RAID is designed for prevention of disk failure. ie. you can lose a disk and your server carries on. If you don't use any form of RAID on your server, you're putting an awful lot of trust in those individual drives.

    Your backup won't be any faster really - as you're still using a 1GbE connection... And I'd assume you're not going to backup to SSD too.

    I really wouldn't be a fan of putting all my file server data on consumer grade drives.

  14. #12
    zag
    zag is offline
    zag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,530
    Thank Post
    815
    Thanked 380 Times in 317 Posts
    Blog Entries
    12
    Rep Power
    80
    Quote Originally Posted by localzuk View Post
    RAID is designed for prevention of disk failure. ie. you can lose a disk and your server carries on. If you don't use any form of RAID on your server, you're putting an awful lot of trust in those individual drives.

    Your backup won't be any faster really - as you're still using a 1GbE connection... And I'd assume you're not going to backup to SSD too.

    I really wouldn't be a fan of putting all my file server data on consumer grade drives.
    Interesting points. For the RAID thing, I really have not had good experience with it in terms of disaster recovery. Had 2 RAID 5 failures compared to 1 Disk failure that was saved with RAID 5!!. I don't get why having 3 disks is better than 1, surely there is 3 x more chance of getting a failure at some point? I can understand the advantages of uptime though.

    The backup server will also be a 600GB SSD as well. Now I think I need to look into a 10GB network connection!

    The other option of course is to make a parallel file server using DFS, I wonder if that is a better idea? If I can build these servers for less than £1.6k each then it might be a good option.

  15. #13

    localzuk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Minehead
    Posts
    17,095
    Thank Post
    511
    Thanked 2,309 Times in 1,785 Posts
    Blog Entries
    24
    Rep Power
    803
    Quote Originally Posted by zag View Post
    Interesting points. For the RAID thing, I really have not had good experience with it in terms of disaster recovery. Had 2 RAID 5 failures compared to 1 Disk failure that was saved with RAID 5!!. I don't get why having 3 disks is better than 1, surely there is 3 x more chance of getting a failure at some point? I can understand the advantages of uptime though.

    The backup server will also be a 600GB SSD as well. Now I think I need to look into a 10GB network connection!

    The other option of course is to make a parallel file server using DFS, I wonder if that is a better idea? If I can build these servers for less than £1.6k each then it might be a good option.
    DFS + 10GbE would likely be a good option. It'd effectively be RAID1 over Ethernet.

    10GbE is expensive though... Very expensive. Might be cheaper, if you have the capacity, to get a couple of multi-port 1GbE cards and bond connections together and get something like 4GbE on the server instead.

  16. Thanks to localzuk from:

    zag (16th October 2012)

  17. #14

    Domino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Bromley
    Posts
    4,020
    Thank Post
    212
    Thanked 1,163 Times in 758 Posts
    Blog Entries
    4
    Rep Power
    480
    Quote Originally Posted by zag View Post
    Interesting points. For the RAID thing, I really have not had good experience with it in terms of disaster recovery. Had 2 RAID 5 failures compared to 1 Disk failure that was saved with RAID 5!!. I don't get why having 3 disks is better than 1, surely there is 3 x more chance of getting a failure at some point? I can understand the advantages of uptime though.
    You're increasing the chance of a single disk failure by 3, but as the array is resilient to a single drive failure you're decreasing the chance of losing the data by a third.

    DFSR on two standard servers is a *much* better idea

  18. #15

    twin--turbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Carlisle
    Posts
    2,334
    Thank Post
    1
    Thanked 381 Times in 340 Posts
    Rep Power
    149
    Quote Originally Posted by zag View Post
    Interesting points. For the RAID thing, I really have not had good experience with it in terms of disaster recovery. Had 2 RAID 5 failures compared to 1 Disk failure that was saved with RAID 5!!. I don't get why having 3 disks is better than 1, surely there is 3 x more chance of getting a failure at some point? I can understand the advantages of uptime though.

    The backup server will also be a 600GB SSD as well. Now I think I need to look into a 10GB network connection!

    The other option of course is to make a parallel file server using DFS, I wonder if that is a better idea? If I can build these servers for less than £1.6k each then it might be a good option.

    I would never run a server without raid,

    quite simply if a disk fails then the server continues to run until the disk rebuilds into the raid or a new disk is rebuilt. Compare that to having to rebuild the server from scratch.

    Rob

SHARE:
+ Post New Thread
Page 1 of 6 12345 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 27th May 2011, 08:42 PM
  2. How much to build a new server?
    By TechSupp in forum Hardware
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 18th January 2011, 09:08 AM
  3. New File Server
    By kevin_lane in forum Windows Server 2008
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 26th March 2010, 08:40 AM
  4. Quote for new file server
    By altecsole in forum Our Advertisers
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 26th October 2009, 11:03 PM
  5. Getting FC4 file server to pick up new users
    By philjones2000 in forum *nix
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 16th February 2007, 11:49 AM

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •