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General Chat Thread, Cycling to Work in General; Really need to motivate myself to get back on the bike!...
  1. #256
    hardtailstar's Avatar
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    Really need to motivate myself to get back on the bike!

  2. #257

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    Hurrah for Slime.

    That's a phrase I never thought I'd type.

    Another puncture this morning, second one to hit the rear wheel (that I'm aware of). Lost of bit of pressure, pumped it up and got to work OK.

    The trick is to keep rolling as long as you can, this gives the Slime a chance to find the puncture and your weight keeps the pressure high which helps the Slime to plug the puncture.

  3. #258
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    Just found out I can apply for another cyclescheme voucher....im looking at a road/commuter bike, any recommedations? I was looking at this 2013 Charge Grater

  4. #259

    jinnantonnixx's Avatar
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    Here's me going to work. Nah, just kidding.


  5. #260
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    Quote Originally Posted by HaleStorm View Post
    Just found out I can apply for another cyclescheme voucher....im looking at a road/commuter bike, any recommedations? I was looking at this 2013 Charge Grater
    I've been riding to work on a Revolution Courier Race for the last 2 years and I really like it. I find it to be a good balance of pace/comfort and 8 gears are more than enough for cycling around town. It's fairly similar to the Charge Grater actually in that both are 700c, 8-speed hybrids. You can often find it on sale at EBC reduced to 280 if you keep an eye on the website. Makes for a bit of a bargain if you get it reduced and then factor in the cyclescheme discount on top of it!

    I've not ridden it but I liked the look of the Focus Arriba I saw when I was in the shop last month.

    I also test rode a Whyte Portobello before I bought my last bike and it was fantastic but it's a bit pricey for commuting at 700 if you don't have somewhere safe to store it when you get to work.
    Last edited by flyinghaggis; 21st December 2013 at 07:37 PM.

  6. #261

    jinnantonnixx's Avatar
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    This is my commuter bike.
    Vitus Bikes Dee-29 city bike 2013

    It's unusual as it's a single speed with disks. I added mudguards and changed the 18T sprocket for a 16T to get the speed up. My route is mostly canal path with stone dust, mud, salt and grit so simplicity is key here, with no gears and mechs to wear out. Change the chain and sprocket once a year and that's it.

  7. #262

    twin--turbo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jinnantonnixx View Post
    Change the chain and sprocket once a year and that's it.
    How many miles are you doing?

    Rob

  8. #263

    jinnantonnixx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by twin--turbo View Post
    How many miles are you doing?

    Rob
    About 2,800 miles a year on that bike. I use 3-in-1 and wipe down and re-oil regularly.
    http://www.biketechreview.com/forum/...in-lubes#22156

    I've got a KMC SS chain (no change-up loops). It's got a bit of stretch on it, so I might think about a tensioner rather than moving the wheel back every so often.
    Chain = 8, Shimano sprocket = 4. Cheap commuting.
    Last edited by jinnantonnixx; 22nd December 2013 at 11:24 AM.

  9. #264
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    Quote Originally Posted by flyinghaggis View Post
    I've been riding to work on a Revolution Courier Race for the last 2 years and I really like it. I find it to be a good balance of pace/comfort and 8 gears are more than enough for cycling around town. It's fairly similar to the Charge Grater actually in that both are 700c, 8-speed hybrids. You can often find it on sale at EBC reduced to 280 if you keep an eye on the website. Makes for a bit of a bargain if you get it reduced and then factor in the cyclescheme discount on top of it!
    Just noticed it's reduced in the sale to 260. Good price if anyone is looking for a cheap bike for commuting to work on.

  10. #265
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    Hello all; quick question before I scoot off and actually research it...

    My school is registered through the Evans Ride2Work scheme, but I'd prefer to go through Halford Cycle to Work and get a Carrera, either a Fury or Vulcan. Can the school be registered to two separate schemes at the same time?

  11. #266

    jinnantonnixx's Avatar
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    My experiment.

    1. Chain
    My drive-train has worn out so I fitted a new bottom-bracket, chainring, chain and sprocket for my single-speed.
    Normally, I just leave the drive-train wear out, as it's not worth junking a serviceable 10 chain to preserve a 3 sprocket on the single-speed. With a conventional derailleur system, you should change the chain to prevent wear to the other expensive components. Single-speed is much simpler.
    I couldn't help but think why back when I was a kid chains lasted forever. Back in the day, we had big heavy chains with bushes, not the lighter bushless chains we have now.
    So I tracked down an old-school bushed chain (a Japanese Izumi track chain) and stuck it on the bike. It's significantly heavier and feels pretty tough. Time will tell if it lasts longer and resists stretch.
    Cycling to Work-img_20140227_171728.jpg
    (I only clean what's necessary - I leave the rest of the bike dirty )

    2.Oil
    On to oil. I did a spot of research to try and find the best oil, studying their ingredients, and found that the fancy boutique oils were quality oils thinned down. The term 'homebrew' kept coming up, so I researched that. It turns out that you can make your own high quality chain oil for pennies.
    You will need a good quality motor oil and some odourless mineral spirit (OMS). The OMS is non-toxic and low volatile, unlike white spirits and turps. Do not be tempted to use turps or white spirit - horrible, nasty stuff you shouldn't get on your skin. Use a non-toxic thinner.
    I had some good motor oil in the garage, so I just had to buy some thinner.
    Cycling to Work-img_20140227_165201.jpg
    Add a measure of oil to the container then add the thinner. You will have to apply some trial and error to get the mix, depending on the viscosity of the neat oil, but I found a mix of 2 thinners to 1 oil was good for my particular oil. It should be thicker than water, but much thinner that the neat oil

    I didn't use an emulsifier or anti-foam agent, so you'll need to invert the bottle several times to mix. If you shake it, it will foam - not a disaster - but makes application a bit harder.
    Apply liberally to the chain after the ride, operating the crank in reverse. The thinner flushes the chain of dirt and muck, and allows the thinned oil to penetrate the chain. Wipe the excess oil from the chain. Overnight, the thinner will evaporate, leaving a thin layer of quality oil in the chain. Before use, wipe the chain free of excess oil - any oil on the surface of the chain will be a dirt-magnet.

    As for costs, 1 litre of homebrew cycle oil will cost about 2 - 3.
    1 litre should last a while.
    Last edited by jinnantonnixx; 27th February 2014 at 10:56 PM.

  12. 2 Thanks to jinnantonnixx:

    Griff (5th March 2014), jumpinjamez (28th February 2014)

  13. #267

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    Quote Originally Posted by jinnantonnixx View Post
    My experiment.

    1. Chain
    ..
    Apply liberally to the chain after the ride, operating the crank in reverse. The thinner flushes the chain of dirt and muck, and allows the thinned oil to penetrate the chain. Wipe the excess oil from the chain. Overnight, the thinner will evaporate, leaving a thin layer of quality oil in the chain. Before use, wipe the chain free of excess oil - any oil on the surface of the chain will be a dirt-magnet.

    As for costs, 1 litre of homebrew cycle oil will cost about 2 - 3.
    1 litre should last a while.
    You oil your chain after each ride?! Wow - I'd get a chain guard and forget about it. Easy without a derallieur.

    Luckily I never had to change a chain as a kid (no tools & wouldn't know how) but that's probably because I didn't ride as far / fast or weigh as much as I do now.

  14. #268

    jinnantonnixx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mats View Post
    You oil your chain after each ride?! Wow - I'd get a chain guard and forget about it. Easy without a derallieur.

    Luckily I never had to change a chain as a kid (no tools & wouldn't know how) but that's probably because I didn't ride as far / fast or weigh as much as I do now.
    Wipedown = 10 seconds, re-oil - 10 seconds, wipedown = 10 seconds! No worries.

    I had a chainguard (an SKS Chainboard) but wasn't very effective. I had to modify it with a Dremel to fit my crank and I didn't find the chain to be any cleaner! Oh well.

    I had been looking at a floating Hebie Chainglider, but can't get one to fit my combination of chainring and sprocket.

    I'm going to try my blend of oil and new heavy duty chain and see how that goes.
    Last edited by jinnantonnixx; 28th February 2014 at 09:16 AM.

  15. #269

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    You'll still be getting grit & dirt in the chain which causes the wear - surely better to work on that than oiling it all the time. The chainguard you had leaves the bottom run (nearest the gritty road) exposed - I'd be looking for a way to protect that. Also - do you have mudguards? They do reduce the amount of much flying around.

    You mentioned earlier using 3 in 1 as a lubricant. I might be wrong but isn't that an easing oil, designed for unsticking things rather than lubricating?

  16. #270

    Oaktech's Avatar
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    As the clutch has gone in my car i've been cycling to work again this week, for the first time in 6 months I have the following advice to offer...

    IF YOU START CYCLING AND THEN STOP CYCLING, DON'T EVER CYCLE AGAIN. IT :: HURTS!

    (limps off into a corner)

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