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General Chat Thread, Anyone handy in the kicthen got an idea? in General; Summer-in-winter chicken recipe - Recipes - BBC Good Food My Signature dish, Summer in winter chicken...
  1. #16

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    Summer-in-winter chicken recipe - Recipes - BBC Good Food My Signature dish, Summer in winter chicken

  2. #17

    Oaktech's Avatar
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    I sometimes do steak strips, marinated for an hour or two in brown sugar, orange juice and balsamic vinegar (posh sweet and sour), then lightly fried with some more brown sugar to caramelise, then served with stir fried vegetable and noodles, add some balsamic vinegar to the stir fry veg too.

  3. Thanks to Oaktech from:

    mac_shinobi (16th July 2012)

  4. #18
    gibbo_ap's Avatar
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    fetuchini alfredo beautiful!

    fettucini alfredo - Google Search

  5. #19

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    Paella, one pan, add some chicken in as well if you wish, just don't let it get too dry or it may catch. Delicious, serve with some garlic bread if you wish and a chilled white rioja.

    • 1 red pepper, finely diced
    • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
    • 2 cloves garlic, peeled
    • 400g paella rice
    • 125ml dry white wine
    • 1 tsp smoked paprika
    • Generous pinch of saffron threads
    • 1l hot vegetable stock
    • 12 large fresh mussels, well scrubbed, beards removed
    • 4 large prawns
    • 4 prepared squid, approx 170g in total, sliced into rings
    • Approx 280g monkfish fillet, roughly chopped
    • Handful flat leaf parsley, chopped
    • 1 lemon cut into wedges
    • Olive oil
    • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper


    Method:
    1. Heat a couple of tablespoons of olive oil in a large paella pan or frying pan. Add the onion and cook out briefly.
    2. Add the chopped pepper and crush in the garlic. Season with a little salt and pepper and cook until softened.
    3. Sprinkle the smoked paprika and saffron into the pan. Follow with the rice and stir well so that each grain of rice is well coated in oil.
    4. Add the wine and allow to evaporate before pouring in the hot stock.
    5. Cover with a lid and leave to simmer gently for 20 minutes. Stir occasionally to prevent the rice from sticking.
    6. Five minutes before the end of cooking add the mussels, prawns, squid and monkfish to the pan. Stir, and replace the lid to finish cooking.
    7. Just before serving, mix through the chopped parsley and garnish with lemon wedges.

  6. #20

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    Can't beat a good Risotto or Paella.

    A nice salad can sometimes work well. I make my own version of this one: Recipes :: Salad with poached eggs & chorizo/ Or failing that, this can work too: http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/c...o-alla-cacciat
    Last edited by Roberto; 16th July 2012 at 02:50 PM.

  7. #21

    JJonas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Disaster View Post
    There's alot of skillz here guys. Good work!
    is the domain cookinggeek.net available?

  8. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by JJonas View Post
    is the domain cookinggeek.net available?
    No idea but you may enjoy Cooking For Engineers - Step by Step Recipes and Food for the Analytically Minded

  9. #23

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    Red Thai Curry is always a winner and you can do it with two pans following this Jamie Oliver recipe, just don't bother with the whole, un-peeled prawns, do everything else as it says but instead use some ready to eat king prawns rather than the small prawns and skip the step requiring the oven. Always works well and if she likes Chinese she'll love it!

    If you're stuck for time, here's a simplified version:

    1 x tablespoon red Thai curry paste (you can buy jars of it from most supermarkets, check the measurement on the jar)
    1 x 400g tin coconut milk
    1 x pack of ready to eat king prawns
    1 x small pack sugar snap peas
    1 x cup of jasmine rice (again, you can buy ready flavoured rice from most supermarkets)
    1 x lime
    1 x small bunch fresh coriander (finely chopped)
    [optional] 2 x naan bread (whatever flavour you fancy)

    Simply add your curry paste to a hot saucepan/wok with a splash of oil (tastes extra authentic if you have sesame oil!) and fry for a minute or so to release the flavour, pour in your coconut milk and give it a good stir, add a good pinch of the fresh coriander and the juice from half the lime (save the other half), then reduce to a medium heat. Make sure you give this a stir every couple of minutes, it'll reduce down and get a nice caramelly smell.
    While that's bubbling away and reducing, add your cup of rice to some boiling water, stir once and put a lid on the pan, reduce to a medium heat when it's up to boiling again and leave for 9 minutes.
    With about 5 minutes left on your rice, drain and rinse your king prawns and then chuck them in to your curry sauce along with the sugar snap peas (in their pods! I got that one wrong first time around ) and give it a stir.
    Once everything is cooked, drain your rice and "fluff" it (run a fork through it to separate it) and chuck your naan's in the microwave for 30 seconds to warm through.
    Serve your rice in to bowls and spoon the curry in to the middle.
    For finishing touches, sprinkle over a pinch of fresh coriander on each dish, then cut the naan's in half and put on one side of each plate, finally cut the remaining lime half in to half again and place those on the other side of each plate.

    It'll look like a cracking meal and it'll only take you about 20 minutes to make
    Last edited by LosOjos; 16th July 2012 at 03:16 PM.

  10. #24

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    No oven? You need a one pot recipe

    I would otherwise have suggested BBC Good Food's Italian Rice with Chicken as the most straightforward of all the recipes (yes, all of them) but needs finishing off with 20 minutes in the oven, so... one pot recipe it is.

  11. #25

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    If she enjoys a taste of the Orient, but you want to avoid Chinese - why not try Thai? If you can't start cooking until late, I'd be tempted to go for readymade nukeables or stir-fry meat/veg and use a pour-on sauce. If you can get Soho lychee liqueur it would go well with Thai.

    If you need to be seen to be making a bit more effort, here's an easy one that goes down well at Chateau LeMarchand:

    You'll need: courgettes, onion, garlic, fresh lemons or lemon juice, fresh basil, black pepper, cheese (hard if you have it/can afford it but Cheddar is fine) some pasta (fusilli or spaghetti works well) and a side salad - and possibly some mushrooms, pine nuts and chilli flakes.

    Start the pasta and finely chop a smallish onion and garlic to taste. Soften in butter (or olive oil) over a low heat. Either cut the courgette into thin ribbons, or use a vegetable peeler to achieve the same result. Add to onions and garlic and finely slice mushrooms (if using) and add when courgettes starting to soften. When courgette at a softness you like, add (to taste) chopped basil, freshly ground black pepper, chilli flakes (not too many) lemon juice (and zest if you had fresh lemons), grate a bit of cheese in (just enough to add a taste of the cheese) and add pine nuts if using (toast first if not already toasted).

    Drain pasta, add courgette mixture and stir together and serve with salad and wine.

  12. #26
    Disaster's Avatar
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    Top work all round. I'm now ruddy starving!

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    Personally I find that you cannot beat a well cooked quality Rib-Eye steak.
    Accompanied with a selection of seasonal vegetables (new potatoes with mint, sugar snap peas etc) and with the sauce of her choice
    A fresh made peppercorn sauce is nice, but you would ned to fiddle around with making a roux, (butter n' flour) as the sauce base. BUt if you feel like a shortcut then most of the packet sauces are tolerable.
    Hell, anything is tolerable when it is accompanied by a quality cut of beef

    Plus this sort of meal really benefits with the restaurant style plating up.

  14. #28

    AMLightfoot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnCondon View Post
    Personally I find that you cannot beat a well cooked quality Rib-Eye steak.
    Accompanied with a selection of seasonal vegetables (new potatoes with mint, sugar snap peas etc) and with the sauce of her choice
    A fresh made peppercorn sauce is nice, but you would ned to fiddle around with making a roux, (butter n' flour) as the sauce base. BUt if you feel like a shortcut then most of the packet sauces are tolerable.
    Hell, anything is tolerable when it is accompanied by a quality cut of beef

    Plus this sort of meal really benefits with the restaurant style plating up.
    Funny you mention ribeye - that Flambe sauce I mentioned is LOVELY with Rib-eye.

    Essentially:

    Bunch of spring onions, chopped,
    2 cloves of Garlic
    A whole box of mushrooms (supermarket sized box)
    Veg stock
    Brandy
    Cream

    Fry off the steak, leave to rest, fry onions and garlic in meat-juiced-pan until soft, add mushrooms, fry down, add generous splosh of brandy, set it on fire (FLAMBE), when flames go out naturally add 1/2 a pint to 1 pint of Veg stock (I use 2 veg oxo cubes and a pint of boiling water but then LeBoyfriend and I eat the sauce with a spoon! 1 Veg Oxo and half a pint will do). Boil vigorously until the stock has reduced to almost nothing (reduced by 3/4 at least), then take off the heat and pour in cream stirring constantly to stop it separating. Add enough cream that it looks like fairly milky tea but still has some colour.

    Serve steak with wedges or jacket spuds and some steamed veg of your choice. We like Baby carrots, steamed Savoy cabbage steamed with butter and salt, and crunchy beans.

  15. #29
    JohnCondon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AMLightfoot View Post
    Funny you mention ribeye - that Flambe sauce I mentioned is LOVELY with Rib-eye.
    While this does sound mouth wateryingly nice.. I suspect that the difficulty of flambe on an electric hob will discount the choice as an option

    But your mention of jacket potatoe.. Always a lovely addition if done just right.. generous knob of butter.. nice creamy spuds!!

  16. #30

    AMLightfoot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnCondon View Post
    While this does sound mouth wateryingly nice.. I suspect that the difficulty of flambe on an electric hob will discount the choice as an option

    But your mention of jacket potatoe.. Always a lovely addition if done just right.. generous knob of butter.. nice creamy spuds!!
    Not at all - enough of a splosh of Brandy and a humble lighter can set it on fire. I have one of those long-necked candle/BBQ lighters. You can get them in any supermarket usually near the matches. We have a leccy hob and it goes up a treat. Give it a moment or two to get hot as it doesn't burn cold, then hold the lighter near the rim of the pan and FWOOSH



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