+ Post New Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19
General Chat Thread, a scientific question about weather temperatures in General; disregarding the Scottish weather where its 4 seasons in a day all year round, a question i have yet to ...
  1. #1

    RabbieBurns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    5,476
    Thank Post
    1,305
    Thanked 469 Times in 306 Posts
    Blog Entries
    6
    Rep Power
    198

    a scientific question about weather temperatures

    disregarding the Scottish weather where its 4 seasons in a day all year round, a question i have yet to be provided a satisfactory explanation to is this.

    Why can it be 29 degrees, sunny, not a cloud in the sky, one day. And then the next day (or in my example provided, 2 days later) 19 degrees, and just as sunny, not a cloud in the sky.

    The sun is giving out the same amount of heat / radiation I assume? And the distance from the sun doesn't change dramatically from one day to the next.

    So where does the heat go?

    a scientific question about weather temperatures-weather.png

    I'm sure there's a simple logical / meteorological explanation (and I'm anticipating an answer about high pressure and low pressure as this is what the weather folk talk about)

  2. #2
    DeltaBravo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    92
    Thank Post
    9
    Thanked 20 Times in 15 Posts
    Rep Power
    31
    I'm no met man, but I think it depends on the air where it comes from, so say the wind is coming from the north, it’s normally colder. Say it’s coming from the south it’s normally warmer.

    Something along them lines I think

    A bit more detail:

    Wind direction, land heats up more easily than water, so if you have a wind blowing in over many kilometeres of land, such as a desert then the air wil heat up before it reaches you, so the temp increase. If the air is blowing over an ocean it will be cooler, or maybe even a snow covered mountain range.
    Last edited by DeltaBravo; 10th May 2012 at 01:49 PM.

  3. Thanks to DeltaBravo from:

    RabbieBurns (10th May 2012)

  4. #3

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    631
    Thank Post
    52
    Thanked 106 Times in 76 Posts
    Rep Power
    63
    I'm also not a meteor...metelo...meatoro....weather person, but DeltaBravo is essentially correct. A northerly wind blowing across the UK brings cold arctic air. A southerly one brings warm air. Last week, for example, we had an easterly wind blowing. This comes from Scandiwegia, and is cooler, so the temperature was around 9C. Today it's a westerly, and the temperature is more like 16C even though it's still grey and overcast and raining.

  5. Thanks to Flatpackhamster from:

    RabbieBurns (10th May 2012)

  6. #4


    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,077
    Thank Post
    136
    Thanked 193 Times in 135 Posts
    Rep Power
    146
    Quote Originally Posted by Flatpackhamster View Post
    I'm also not a meteor...metelo...meatoro....weather person, but DeltaBravo is essentially correct. A northerly wind blowing across the UK brings cold arctic air. A southerly one brings warm air. Last week, for example, we had an easterly wind blowing. This comes from Scandiwegia, and is cooler, so the temperature was around 9C. Today it's a westerly, and the temperature is more like 16C even though it's still grey and overcast and raining.
    Unless, like Rabbie, you happen to live in the southern hemisphere, in which case a southerly wind will be bringing cold Antarctic air.

    And the water will go down the plughole the other way round, so I'm told.

  7. Thanks to Earthling from:

    RabbieBurns (10th May 2012)

  8. #5
    denon101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Stuck in the server room......
    Posts
    389
    Thank Post
    54
    Thanked 37 Times in 35 Posts
    Rep Power
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by Earthling View Post
    Unless, like Rabbie, you happen to live in the southern hemisphere, in which case a southerly wind will be bringing cold Antarctic air.

    And the water will go down the plughole the other way round, so I'm told.
    Unless you visit the USA Embassy on the Simpsons......

  9. Thanks to denon101 from:

    RabbieBurns (10th May 2012)

  10. #6

    Andrew_C's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Winchester
    Posts
    2,840
    Thank Post
    62
    Thanked 348 Times in 269 Posts
    Rep Power
    149
    Ahh... but the sea is a huge store of heat. It is air passing over warm oceans that gives rise to hurricanes.

    But yes; air temperature is not solely linked to the current level of sunshine.

  11. Thanks to Andrew_C from:

    RabbieBurns (10th May 2012)

  12. #7

    RabbieBurns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    5,476
    Thank Post
    1,305
    Thanked 469 Times in 306 Posts
    Blog Entries
    6
    Rep Power
    198
    so that's the difference then simple as that? tomorrow the winds blow from the equator down to us, and the next day they blow from Antarctica up to us?

    not so scientific after all

    So while we are here, what has the pressure stuff got to do with things? Is that just to do with how dense the clouds are and if its more likely to rain?

  13. #8

    RabbieBurns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    5,476
    Thank Post
    1,305
    Thanked 469 Times in 306 Posts
    Blog Entries
    6
    Rep Power
    198
    Quote Originally Posted by denon101 View Post
    Unless you visit the USA Embassy on the Simpsons......
    they would kick my ass if i tried that

  14. #9

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    631
    Thank Post
    52
    Thanked 106 Times in 76 Posts
    Rep Power
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by Earthling View Post
    Unless, like Rabbie, you happen to live in the southern hemisphere, in which case a southerly wind will be bringing cold Antarctic air.

    And the water will go down the plughole the other way round, so I'm told.
    Apparently it doesn't.

  15. #10


    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,077
    Thank Post
    136
    Thanked 193 Times in 135 Posts
    Rep Power
    146
    Quote Originally Posted by Flatpackhamster View Post
    Apparently it doesn't.
    Oh well, another 76 weeks or so (see other thread) and I'll be finding out for myself.

  16. #11

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    631
    Thank Post
    52
    Thanked 106 Times in 76 Posts
    Rep Power
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by RabbieBurns View Post
    so that's the difference then simple as that? tomorrow the winds blow from the equator down to us, and the next day they blow from Antarctica up to us?

    not so scientific after all

    So while we are here, what has the pressure stuff got to do with things? Is that just to do with how dense the clouds are and if its more likely to rain?
    The best I can do is point you to the second, third and fourth paragraphs of this Wikipedia article. Sorry:

    Pressure system - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  17. #12

    Andrew_C's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Winchester
    Posts
    2,840
    Thank Post
    62
    Thanked 348 Times in 269 Posts
    Rep Power
    149
    If you have a low and a high pressure area, the air will flow from the high to the low. This air flow will spiral like water in the plug hole. Thus you get wind, cyclonic and anti-cyclonic weather systems.

  18. #13

    RabbieBurns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    5,476
    Thank Post
    1,305
    Thanked 469 Times in 306 Posts
    Blog Entries
    6
    Rep Power
    198
    Quote Originally Posted by Flatpackhamster View Post
    Apparently it doesn't.
    I cant remember what way it goes down the plughole up northern hemisphere.. i just flushed the toiled there and it went to fast to tell. But emptying a full sink it went anticlockwise.

  19. #14

    RabbieBurns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    5,476
    Thank Post
    1,305
    Thanked 469 Times in 306 Posts
    Blog Entries
    6
    Rep Power
    198
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew_C View Post
    If you have a low and a high pressure area, the air will flow from the high to the low. This air flow will spiral like water in the plug hole. Thus you get wind, cyclonic and anti-cyclonic weather systems.
    so a high to a low, depending on the location of the high and the low, will either bring cold air from the cold part of the world, or hot air from a hot part of the world?

  20. #15
    CAM
    CAM is offline

    CAM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Burgh Heath, Surrey
    Posts
    3,703
    Thank Post
    755
    Thanked 296 Times in 233 Posts
    Blog Entries
    60
    Rep Power
    243
    As you said, clear skies. At night the clouds help to keep the warmth in like a blanket when turned away from the Sun. Clear skies let the warmth escape so it will be colder and more chance of a morning frost.

    Oddly enough, snow clouds form a blanket over the sky too but the snow on the ground makes everything behave weirdly anyway. It's freezing cold but a good insulator?

SHARE:
+ Post New Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. BAsic question about Shadow Copies
    By Kyle in forum Windows
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 6th March 2006, 07:56 PM
  2. Question about Shadow Copies.....?
    By Kyle in forum Windows
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 6th March 2006, 12:41 AM
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 1st February 2006, 01:04 AM
  4. Question about fresh install of server 2003.
    By Kyle in forum How do you do....it?
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 20th January 2006, 09:08 AM
  5. Quick question about redirecting folders
    By MikeR in forum Windows
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 3rd November 2005, 12:30 PM

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •