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General Chat Thread, Hello guys, please help a newbie! in General; Hello to you all, im 18 years of age currently working in a high school as a junior technician on ...
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    Hello guys, please help a newbie!

    Hello to you all, im 18 years of age currently working in a high school as a junior technician on an apprenticeship that ive been attending for 5 weeks running now, I have little experience and im coming here in the hope that I can learn alot, in which area of IT? No idea, but would like to grasp some knowledge in all areas so i can choose to expertise in one in the most preferred, where shall I start?

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    Networking and hardware's always a good place to start, and you can then build on that.

    Really though if you want to go into IT, you need to know a little bit of everything (unless you want to go specialist, but you don't seem to know what you'd like to specialise in). Keep up with the tech news, experiment with different software, try to get involved in everything going on with the network team you're working with (and help out). If you come across something you haven't seen, look it up and find out about it as well as simply asking questions.

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    As with everything, the majority of an IT Technician's role is: if you don't know the answer, head for google and keep looking til you do... A hell of a lot of it is simply a case of teach yourself as and when you need whatever particular bit of knowledge.

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    rad
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    As said, its all about trying something, if that doesn't work, try something else, then if all else fails Google it.

    Somethings though do die and you can't fix them, monitors and printers are a bain of my life. They die, and I would rather replace it than patch it.

    PC's though are easier, and the interweb is a great help. All hands on, build a PC, take bits out and see what happens.

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    Learning the Basics of TCP/IP networks would be step one (i would mess around with your network at home for a start) and then after that, move onto using Windows Servers and learning about "Domain" Networks and how they operate. After that you should have enough of a base to start looking for your first role and then just keep learning on the job

    hope that helps mate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesb View Post
    ....unless you want to go specialist....
    Off topic, but it reminded me that: "A specialist is someone who knows more and more about less and less, until he eventually knows everything about nothing".

    I'd agree that the right approach is to be Jack of all trades, know your limitations and know when to call for help.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ignatius View Post
    I'd agree that the right approach is to be Jack of all trades, know your limitations and know when to call for help.
    There's two variants available there - you can be a Jack of All Trades and Master of None, or work a little harder and become the incredibly valuable Jack of All Trades and Master of Some. Get a few areas of particular expertise under your belt (preferably things which interest you) and make sure you keep a general appreciation for everything else - makes you worth a fortune in the right job.

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    I found that when i was in your position the best way to learn is to get hands on and if you don't know the answer don't be scared to ask another member of the team. Then when they do give you help/advice go on internet and research it some more as it will enhance your understanding. Also echo all of the above comments. Also Google is your friend!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesb View Post
    There's two variants available there - you can be a Jack of All Trades and Master of None, or work a little harder and become the incredibly valuable Jack of All Trades and Master of Some. Get a few areas of particular expertise under your belt (preferably things which interest you) and make sure you keep a general appreciation for everything else - makes you worth a fortune in the right job.
    JamesB has hit the nail on the head here. I personally feel im jack of all the IT Support/ Networking trades but i specialise in Network Hardware (ie switches routers etc) and Remote Access (RDP, TS, VPN etc) and it has served me very very well.

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    I would look in to basic hardware & networking. Stuff based around CompTIA A+ & N+ type stuff.
    Then you can try out some basic web development such as CSS/HTML
    Also try a bit of development with something like Visual Basic or another programming language.
    Get to grips with Office and some of the advanced functions and experiment with maybe even VB script.
    MS Access - getting to grip with some basic relational databases would be useful.

    Most of this stuff tie-in with each other so it's good to know the basics of all. I think it's easier to use a new software application if you have created and know how they work yourself.

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    i would look on monster.com at well paid jobs, look what quals they require.... go from there.... wish this owas taught at school, i woulnt be here!!!

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