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General Chat Thread, Entry route into having a job in networking? in General; I would also recommend looking into an NVQ and study for CompTIA A+ and possibly N+m then move in to ...
  1. #31
    bondbill2k2's Avatar
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    I would also recommend looking into an NVQ and study for CompTIA A+ and possibly N+m then move in to more specalised areas such as Cisco and MCSE's.
    Thankfully I managed to get an entry level role after doing my Computer studies degree (which has no relation to the world of IT, its all programming and website stuff) with no other certifications to my name, I have since completed 701 of my A+ and really should be taking my 702 to become A+ certified asap (ive let it slip) Im learning on the job atm alot as before now I'd never touched a network or a server or even knew anything about them.

    I really recommend the Mike Meyers books e.g.
    CompTIA A+ Certification All-in-One Exam Guide, Seventh Edition (Exams 220-701 & 220-702) eBook: Michael Meyers: Amazon.co.uk: Kindle Store

    Or the "slimmed down" passport versions which cover the areas for the exam but dont elabourate on them much compared to the main book
    MIKE MEYERS' A+ R CERTIFICATION PASSPORT, SECOND EDITION Mike Meyer's Certification Passport: Amazon.co.uk: Michael Meyers, Martin Acuna: Books

    N+
    CompTIA Network+ All-in-One Exam Guide, Fourth Edition: Amazon.co.uk: Michael Meyers: Books

    I have both are they are great study guides and refrence guides. Even getting a part time entry job will help you or anything you can which is related will look better on your CV then "shop work". Its tough as most jobs even entry jobs are recieved applicants who have worked in the industry for some time and been made redundant in these times.

  2. #32
    TheMan100's Avatar
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    Advanced Apprenticeships for IT & Telecoms Professionals
    "National IT Partnership (NiTP) Fast Track Advanced Apprenticeship for IT & Telecoms Professionals" seems good.

    "
    * 7 months Intensive Apprenticeship
    * Specified units ideal for a number of IT technician and network support roles
    * Time is split equally between an employed work placement and Bedford College.
    "

    Qualifications which you can gain from the apprenticeship:
    Certificate in ICT Systems and Principles - CompTIA A+ - Microsoft Certified Technical Specialist (MCTS) - Microsoft Certified IT Professionals (MCITP)

    I'd say that's a good apprenticeship :P

  3. #33

    Dos_Box's Avatar
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    This is the kind of 'modern' apprenticeships that the current govt it trying to move away from and back to the old kind which industry used to run. Many years back we entered into a weird situation where the education sector started to be led by the colleges dictating what skills should be taught rather that the industries themselves. These courses then became vital sources of revenue for the colleges.
    I'm not knocking the course, but rather the way you have to get an apprenticeship via the college rather than via the company you actually wanted to work for in the first place.

  4. #34

    russdev's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheMan100 View Post
    Advanced Apprenticeships for IT & Telecoms Professionals
    "National IT Partnership (NiTP) Fast Track Advanced Apprenticeship for IT & Telecoms Professionals" seems good.

    "
    * 7 months Intensive Apprenticeship
    * Specified units ideal for a number of IT technician and network support roles
    * Time is split equally between an employed work placement and Bedford College.
    "

    Qualifications which you can gain from the apprenticeship:
    Certificate in ICT Systems and Principles - CompTIA A+ - Microsoft Certified Technical Specialist (MCTS) - Microsoft Certified IT Professionals (MCITP)

    I'd say that's a good apprenticeship :P
    I wish that was around when I was young.

    I certainly started out getting unpaid experience while I was at college (helped the IT department out) which then turned into my first job (although temporary) it was enough to give me some experience.

    Sadly in this market young people need both some kind of qualification and experience. I would say in terms of industry qualification higher the better but entry level job I would like something along the lines of A+ or N+ (or both).

    As other people said apprenticeship in current climate is a good thing.

    Russell
    Last edited by russdev; 6th March 2011 at 07:16 AM.

  5. #35
    TheMan100's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dos_Box View Post
    This is the kind of 'modern' apprenticeships that the current govt it trying to move away from and back to the old kind which industry used to run. Many years back we entered into a weird situation where the education sector started to be led by the colleges dictating what skills should be taught rather that the industries themselves. These courses then became vital sources of revenue for the colleges.
    I'm not knocking the course, but rather the way you have to get an apprenticeship via the college rather than via the company you actually wanted to work for in the first place.
    It says the time is split between an employed work placement, could that count as some sort of experience'?
    Last edited by TheMan100; 6th March 2011 at 04:08 PM.

  6. #36

    Dos_Box's Avatar
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    Sort of. This is where the watering down of apprenticeships has muddied the waters some. If you went back, say, 20 years and you wanted to be an aircraft engineer the you had on of 2 options.

    1.Join the forces and spend several years training to become one (the equivalent of an apprenticeship) and then spend subsequent years building up your skills (the career part) to enable you to earn higher wages, better positions and authority etc.

    2. Join a company such as BAE as an apprentice and spend 3 days a week learning skills with them and 2 days a week at college getting the academic side (maths, physics etc.) digested. the point being here is that unless you finished your apprenticeship (and became a 'journeyman') and had the relevant paperwork to say so, you were unemployable in that field.

    Now, I'm not to sure how a modern apprenticeship works, but you will certainly have 'on the job' training, and gain a few qualifications over the period of the apprenticeship, but should you drop out it may look bad,especially if you are only there to get 'experience', and not see the course through, because all this tells future employers is that you are simply there to use their company as a stepping stone.

  7. #37
    TheMan100's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dos_Box View Post
    Sort of. This is where the watering down of apprenticeships has muddied the waters some. If you went back, say, 20 years and you wanted to be an aircraft engineer the you had on of 2 options.

    1.Join the forces and spend several years training to become one (the equivalent of an apprenticeship) and then spend subsequent years building up your skills (the career part) to enable you to earn higher wages, better positions and authority etc.

    2. Join a company such as BAE as an apprentice and spend 3 days a week learning skills with them and 2 days a week at college getting the academic side (maths, physics etc.) digested. the point being here is that unless you finished your apprenticeship (and became a 'journeyman') and had the relevant paperwork to say so, you were unemployable in that field.

    Now, I'm not to sure how a modern apprenticeship works, but you will certainly have 'on the job' training, and gain a few qualifications over the period of the apprenticeship, but should you drop out it may look bad,especially if you are only there to get 'experience', and not see the course through, because all this tells future employers is that you are simply there to use their company as a stepping stone.
    Ah, I see where you're coming from. I plan on following through the apprenticeship if I go on it, definitely not drop out until it's finished. But I'm pretty sure things may have changed from 20 years ago :P

  8. #38

    nephilim's Avatar
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    Modern Apprenticeships "sound" good to young people which is where the catch is.

    You work for 90 a week on a 37.5 hour "shift", this is done 30 hours on the job, 7.5 hours in college. It works out to be about 2.60 an hour. Yes this is more than EMA, and you get on the job training (which is not a bad thing), but you learn how that company does things, rather than how things are done in a "vanilla" environment. I have found when learning skills, vanilla environments are the best way to learn so you can adapt to how companies work rather than having to relearn all over again.

  9. #39
    TheMan100's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nephilim View Post
    Modern Apprenticeships "sound" good to young people which is where the catch is.

    You work for 90 a week on a 37.5 hour "shift", this is done 30 hours on the job, 7.5 hours in college. It works out to be about 2.60 an hour. Yes this is more than EMA, and you get on the job training (which is not a bad thing), but you learn how that company does things, rather than how things are done in a "vanilla" environment. I have found when learning skills, vanilla environments are the best way to learn so you can adapt to how companies work rather than having to relearn all over again.
    The pay isn't fantastic, but I'm sure 90 a week is good for someone still living at home (like my self), as for EMA, I've never heard of it if I'm honest with you.

  10. #40
    somabc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheMan100 View Post
    The pay isn't fantastic, but I'm sure 90 a week is good for someone still living at home (like my self), as for EMA, I've never heard of it if I'm honest with you.
    Depends where you work, 90 a week may not even cover the travel expenses. Say I live in Zone 6 London and get the Tube to Zone 1 for work then that would cost 50 / week. If you were getting a train or petrol it could easily be more.

  11. #41

    GREED's Avatar
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    I'd like to put in my 2 pence, as I run apprenticeships for my company. 95 per week is the bare minimum, although in fact legislation states it as being 2.50 per hour. Our apprenticeships are lead by the employers themselves, with on the job training taking priority over all things. My guys and girls get NVQ L2 and L3, technical certificates, Key/Functional Skills L1 and L2 (equivilant of top GCSE), and at L3 we offer A+ and Windows 7 MCITP exams if they choose. We being a MS IT Academy means we have access to online training materials for most of this to give access to.

    All of my guys love what they do, get so much out of it (I have countless feedback reports from them on the subject), and most either stay in their position or move on up the ladder within the 18 months we give them to complete it all.

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