+ Post New Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9
General Chat Thread, Binary have I got it right? in General; I was reading my networking book and it starts of with the maths involved in networking such as binary. I ...
  1. #1
    My220x's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    257
    Thank Post
    9
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    Blog Entries
    8
    Rep Power
    14

    Binary have I got it right?

    I was reading my networking book and it starts of with the maths involved in networking such as binary. I myself am not a maths genius but I actually think I have got the hand of binary.

    Ok, what I know is each 1 and 0 is known as a bit and 8 bits make a byte so 1,000 bits would be a kilobit and 1,000 bytes would be a kilobyte, so would that make 8,000 bits a kilobyte?

    I also know that 1= on and 0= off and that 128, 64, 32, 16, 8, 4, 2 and 1 are the lowest eight positions used in the binary numbering system so the binary number 10110 would be 24 in the decimal system?

    If all I have said is correct then I will be pretty happy as it means I understand binary Also, I know undestand the joke about there is only 10 types of people in this world.....

  2. #2

    Hightower's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Cloud 9
    Posts
    4,920
    Thank Post
    494
    Thanked 690 Times in 444 Posts
    Rep Power
    241
    Is it not....

    1000 bits = 1 kilobit
    1024 bytes = 1 kilobyte

    I'm probably a mile off with that though haha

  3. #3
    My220x's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    257
    Thank Post
    9
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    Blog Entries
    8
    Rep Power
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by Hightower View Post
    Is it not....

    1000 bits = 1 kilobit
    1024 bytes = 1 kilobyte

    I'm probably a mile off with that though haha
    You are correct but my books says 1000.

  4. #4

    Hightower's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Cloud 9
    Posts
    4,920
    Thank Post
    494
    Thanked 690 Times in 444 Posts
    Rep Power
    241
    I'm going through a C++ book and it had a section on binary - I'm sure that's what it said.....

    Still haven't got a clue about it though haha

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Hampshire
    Posts
    24
    Thank Post
    0
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    Rep Power
    19
    kilo actually means 1000 - think kilometre = 1000 metres etc.

    Specifically in computing you get the 1024 because of binary - put 1024 and 1000 into binary and you can then see how the bits in a binary counter make using 1024 easier to work with.

    Also...
    In binary 10110 = 1x16 + 0x8 + 1x4 + 1x2 + 0x1 therefore 16+4+2 = 22 not 24!

    If you want an easy way to chech binary, use the Windows calculator (in scientific mode) - it will let you enter numbers and translate them between Hex, decimal, octal and binary.

  6. #6
    My220x's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    257
    Thank Post
    9
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    Blog Entries
    8
    Rep Power
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by R.M.B View Post
    kilo actually means 1000 - think kilometre = 1000 metres etc.

    Specifically in computing you get the 1024 because of binary - put 1024 and 1000 into binary and you can then see how the bits in a binary counter make using 1024 easier to work with.

    Also...
    In binary 10110 = 1x16 + 0x8 + 1x4 + 1x2 + 0x1 therefore 16+4+2 = 22 not 24!

    If you want an easy way to chech binary, use the Windows calculator (in scientific mode) - it will let you enter numbers and translate them between Hex, decimal, octal and binary.
    Added it wrong,

  7. #7


    tom_newton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Leeds
    Posts
    4,462
    Thank Post
    866
    Thanked 845 Times in 667 Posts
    Rep Power
    195
    In IT assume "kilo" = 1024 unless written by a marketer - we are in base 2 after all

    Bit that some get wrong is the difference between kilobit (Kb) and kiloblyte (KB) - often not written differently, and you can usually only tell from the kontext - generally, if you see kb in computing it is byte, in comms and bandwidth it is bit (8 times smaller)

  8. #8
    somabc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2,337
    Thank Post
    83
    Thanked 388 Times in 258 Posts
    Rep Power
    111

  9. #9

    localzuk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Minehead
    Posts
    17,641
    Thank Post
    514
    Thanked 2,443 Times in 1,891 Posts
    Blog Entries
    24
    Rep Power
    831
    Quote Originally Posted by somabc View Post
    I wish the uptake of the IEC prefixes was more widespread. It'd make life easier when explaining to someone why their 250GB hard disk is actually much less than that.

SHARE:
+ Post New Thread

Similar Threads

  1. What's binary Dad?
    By SimpleSi in forum General Chat
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: 9th April 2008, 10:37 AM
  2. Binary Clock for the masses
    By Scruff in forum General Chat
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 15th June 2007, 07:58 PM

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •