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General Chat Thread, Didn't Know This Until This Evening: Command Prompt Tip: Drag Folder To Auto Complete in General; At the Command Prompt type CD then a space then drag a folder to the Command Prompt to have the ...
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    DaveP's Avatar
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    Didn't Know This Until This Evening: Command Prompt Tip: Drag Folder To Auto Complete

    At the Command Prompt type CD then a space then drag a folder to the Command Prompt to have the selected path to the folder auto completed:


  2. 5 Thanks to DaveP:

    ellsandell (1st February 2014), jamesreedersmith (1st February 2014), john (3rd February 2014), TheBinMan (2nd February 2014), ZeroHour (3rd February 2014)

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    Cool tip thanks

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    Can also go into the folder, hold down shift and right click.
    You get a open with command prompt option

  5. Thanks to dany2010 from:

    DaveP (2nd February 2014)

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    Probably worth mentioning that dragging a file or folder only works as long as the Command Prompt hasn't been elevated.

    Also useful is ContextConsole and the PowerShell script below which add elevated Command Prompt and PowerShell options to your context menu. With these, you can do what @dany2010 suggested as this is often quicker than dragging and dropping folders onto Command Prompt windows.



    Code:
    $menu = 'Open Windows PowerShell'
    $command = "$PSHOME\powershell.exe -NoExit -NoProfile -Command ""Set-Location '%V'"""
     
    'directory', 'directory\background', 'drive' | ForEach-Object {
        New-Item -Path "Registry::HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\$_\shell" -Name runas\command -Force |
        Set-ItemProperty -Name '(default)' -Value $command -PassThru |
        Set-ItemProperty -Path {$_.PSParentPath} -Name '(default)' -Value $menu -PassThru |
        Set-ItemProperty -Name HasLUAShield -Value ''
    }
    Source: http://www.powershellmagazine.com/20...dows-explorer/
    Last edited by Arthur; 1st February 2014 at 10:36 PM.

  7. 2 Thanks to Arthur:

    DaveP (2nd February 2014), ZeroHour (3rd February 2014)

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    Ephelyon's Avatar
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    You can also start typing the first few characters of a sub-folder/file name (until it's unique) and then press TAB to auto-complete.

  9. Thanks to Ephelyon from:

    DaveP (2nd February 2014)

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