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General Chat Thread, Wow Coffee!!!!! in General; Originally Posted by VeryPC Got this selection of "Coffees of the World" for Xmas which I've brought in to share ...
  1. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by VeryPC
    Got this selection of "Coffees of the World" for Xmas which I've brought in to share as I'd never get through them all at home:
    Attachment 22251
    Methinks mespies a future VeryPC prize!

    Quote Originally Posted by jinnantonnixx View Post
    The cornerstone is the espresso. One large scoop of fine grounds, and just a little water through an Aeropress. Do not filter a full cup of water through, this is the wrong approach which will give you a bitter cup.
    Filtering a small quantity of hot (but not boiling) water through grounds will leave you with a strong, smooth espresso. Add water to dilute it to taste.
    ^ This ^
    Although I tend to use 3 scoops of grounds and fill the Aeropress to number 3 (ie 3 espressos) and I top up a large mug with frothed milk for a latte. If I don't do this in the morning, I have a headache by morning 'playtime'. Once I'm in school, though, it's either water or some kind of herbal infusion - usually nettle with half a teaspoon of locally sourced honey. Used to drink gallons of coffee years ago, but it gave me an irregular hearbeat. I'm much better these days.

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    Espresso should be reasonably precise, a single espresso is made using 7g of finely ground coffee compressed in the basket such that water @ 198deg F and under 9 barr of pressure takes 25 seconds to pour 1fl/oz of shot. A double takes exactly the same time using 14g of grounds and producing 2fl/oz. The liquid produced should be quite thick and have good crema. That's it. The biggest crime in the UK seems to be espresso that has too much liquid - which will often mean it is over extracted so a cup of watery bitter slop.

    Bitterness is generally a sign of over extraction - water too hot but more critically, in contact with the grounds too long. Some people seem convinced that using boiling water (or water just off the boil) will somehow burn the coffee, but given the beans will be in a roaster at much higher temperatures, that's not going to happen. Boiling water will make the extraction more rapid, so you just have less time before you start to get the bitter residues from the grind.

    Espresso blends tend to incorporate maybe 20% robusta, a species which *is* bitter (can be like burnt rubber) but is used to give a blend body and sometimes character. The temptation for some producers is to use too much robusta. Robusta is cheap compared to pure arabica strains so using more is a way to generate more profit.

    IMO the biggest single factor between "wow coffee" and "it's caffine it will do" is how fresh the beans (or grind) is. Beans once roasted will be past their best in a few weeks and ground coffee starts to lose it's vitality a few hours after being ground. You can slow that down by vacuum packaging and using inert gasses prior to packaging to try and eliminate oxygen, but getting fresh roasted beans is the route to great coffee. That said, you don't want them straight out of the roaster - roasted beans give off CO2 so really need a day to de-gas, especially if you are making espresso where really fresh beans tend to produce spectacular crema.

    There. I did say I was a bit of a coffee geek.

  3. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by pcstru View Post
    Espresso should be reasonably precise, a single espresso is made using 7g of finely ground coffee compressed in the basket such that water @ 198deg F and under 9 barr of pressure takes 25 seconds to pour 1fl/oz of shot. A double takes exactly the same time using 14g of grounds and producing 2fl/oz. The liquid produced should be quite thick and have good crema. That's it. The biggest crime in the UK seems to be espresso that has too much liquid - which will often mean it is over extracted so a cup of watery bitter slop.

    Bitterness is generally a sign of over extraction - water too hot but more critically, in contact with the grounds too long. Some people seem convinced that using boiling water (or water just off the boil) will somehow burn the coffee, but given the beans will be in a roaster at much higher temperatures, that's not going to happen. Boiling water will make the extraction more rapid, so you just have less time before you start to get the bitter residues from the grind.

    Espresso blends tend to incorporate maybe 20% robusta, a species which *is* bitter (can be like burnt rubber) but is used to give a blend body and sometimes character. The temptation for some producers is to use too much robusta. Robusta is cheap compared to pure arabica strains so using more is a way to generate more profit.

    IMO the biggest single factor between "wow coffee" and "it's caffine it will do" is how fresh the beans (or grind) is. Beans once roasted will be past their best in a few weeks and ground coffee starts to lose it's vitality a few hours after being ground. You can slow that down by vacuum packaging and using inert gasses prior to packaging to try and eliminate oxygen, but getting fresh roasted beans is the route to great coffee. That said, you don't want them straight out of the roaster - roasted beans give off CO2 so really need a day to de-gas, especially if you are making espresso where really fresh beans tend to produce spectacular crema.

    There. I did say I was a bit of a coffee geek.
    I'd heard it was good to leave 5-10 days after roasting, but I usually order mine when i'm practically out so end up using it immediately anyway, i.e. I ground a few cups worth from that bag pictured, this morning

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenbeast View Post
    I'd heard it was good to leave 5-10 days after roasting, but I usually order mine when i'm practically out so end up using it immediately anyway, i.e. I ground a few cups worth from that bag pictured, this morning
    I wouldn't leave it that long - 24 hours max. I'm a bit the same in terms of anticipating running out. I usually do a roast at the weekend at which point I'll have pretty much run out. You can roast coffee using a paint stripping heat gun with the beans in a stainless steel dog bowl. Takes about 15-20 mins during which you need to keep stirring the beans. It's a bit ... err ... well, dedicated might be a good word! The advantage of buying green beans is they pretty much keep forever.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pcstru View Post
    paint stripping heat gun with the beans in a stainless steel dog bowl.
    My first thought at reading this was Vanepole's "Are you a hobo?"
    That sounds like a serious real-world kludge :P
    Last edited by Garacesh; 10th January 2014 at 11:16 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pcstru View Post
    I wouldn't leave it that long - 24 hours max. I'm a bit the same in terms of anticipating running out. I usually do a roast at the weekend at which point I'll have pretty much run out. You can roast coffee using a paint stripping heat gun with the beans in a stainless steel dog bowl. Takes about 15-20 mins during which you need to keep stirring the beans. It's a bit ... err ... well, dedicated might be a good word! The advantage of buying green beans is they pretty much keep forever.
    ok that's good to know, my RAVE beans are always roasted a day or two before receiving so that's fine.

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