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General Chat Thread, Gaming dev resources for a noob in General; It always fascinates me how you hear of indie games can built by a single person with skills in coding ...
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    Gaming dev resources for a noob

    It always fascinates me how you hear of indie games can built by a single person with skills in coding because they could do it, or because they they wanted to learn how to code. I believe the creator of Terraria built it purely to learn how to code in C#?

    I've never done anything like it but I'd really like to give it a go learning C# and maybe try my hand at developing something. Whatever it is, it would be ground breaking or awesome, but if I learn from it, that's a plus in its own. If anyone has any suggestions on where to start, useful resources, books, tutorials etc, please feel free to share then.

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    X-13's Avatar
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    Here's a load of information.

    Everything from engines and art to marketing and merch. [Some free, some paid.]

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    Rawns (24th June 2013)

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    C. C#. C++. Start from the basics. There are thousands of tutorials, books, resources, examples on the WWW.

    To source out the best, would be damn well hard. Your best bet is to talk to a experienced programmer (8+ years in the business) and ask them how to go about it. I did c++ in University, and it hurt my head for an entire year.

    It's usually 'C for dummies' book and then tutorials online, then expanding on what you've done.
    You then move onto C# which expands upon OO and various other paths.
    Then C++ which is games programming, software engineering and a ton of other stuff. Bloody 'el i'm having nightmares again!

    C has unlimited possibilities. You'll end up turning into a hobo. Best of luck! Yer gonna need it!

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    Do you have any coding knowledge going in to this or are you going in as a complete n00b? If you haven't programmed at all before, then start off with some basic coding tutorials for your chosen language. It'll give you at least a basic understanding of generic coding principles as well as some specifics in the syntax of the language you choose, both of which will make the relatively complex process of game programming easier in the long run.

    C# is a good choice IMO as it's what XNA is based on, the framework used to make indie Xbox games and Windows Phone games (both will also run in Windows and the framework ports them automatically for you). Downside to XNA is it's Windows only. Windows Phone Dev Center

    Java is a good choice for multi platform development and, in my opinion, a nice language to learn. It's very wordy compared to some others, but that's not necessarily a bad thing when you're starting out - it certainly makes code more readable! If you decide on java, then this forum will be a good starting point: Java-Gaming.org - home of the largest java game developer community

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    TBH, before you crack on with coding, you need to decide what you want to make. [I'd suggest a platformer.]

    Then work on it piece by piece.

    Create a basic "character".
    Work on movement.
    Collision detection.
    Design a basic [useable] level.*
    Make movement animations.

    Once you've done that... You've made a game! [Of sorts.]

    Are you planning to use custom resources [art, music, props and stuff] or pre-made?


    *This is a lot of work. You need all the assets made and the ability to call and render them WHERE YOU WANT THEM as they're needed. I would NOT suggest rendering the entire level at once, the load times will be long and the memory useage could be high.

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    If you just want to play about with the mechanics of games without worrying about the assets, build the game using ASCII graphics.

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    Quote Originally Posted by X-13 View Post
    TBH, before you crack on with coding, you need to decide what you want to make. [I'd suggest a platformer.]

    *SNIP*
    Personally, I think this approach lines too many people up for disappointment.

    I'd jump straight in to coding from tutorials, then make something simple like a Space Invaders or Pac Man clone off your own back (obviously by researching the necessary code and techniques, but without following a tutorial). This will give you a good working knowledge of the language and of the concepts of the game loop, of collision detection, of drawing sprites, animating them, playing music, menu routing - everything you'll need to know before you make your dream game. It'll take all the pressure of designing something from scratch off you - you'll actually be able to see the end result you're working towards, then you just need to work out how to get there.

    Far too many people set out to make the game of their dreams straight away and quickly become disenchanted and give up. Start simple, build up a solid grounding, then try to make your dream game!
    Last edited by LosOjos; 24th June 2013 at 01:22 PM.

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    I think the assets are the hardest part as it is very easy to look at what you have in beta stages and not get depressed as it looks awful. One reason Dust: Elysian Tail (about one of the biggest indie hits of late!) was so successful was because the developer went from artist to coder instead of the typical other way round. He made the assets as well as code where as you would probably have to get someone to make the assets for you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LosOjos View Post
    Far too many people set out to make the game of their dreams straight away and quickly become disenchanted and give up. Start simple, build up a solid grounding, then try to make your dream game!
    I'm talking about tutorial builds. IMO, a Mario-esque platformer would be good for learning a lot of the necessary game creation principles.

    Especially if you add enemies and powerups.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LosOjos View Post
    Personally, I think this approach lines too many people up for disappointment.

    I'd jump straight in to coding from tutorials, then make something simple like a Space Invaders or Pac Man clone off your own back (obviously by researching the necessary code and techniques, but without following a tutorial). This will give you a good working knowledge of the language and of the concepts of the game loop, of collision detection, of drawing sprites, animating them, playing music, menu routing - everything you'll need to know before you make your dream game. It'll take all the pressure of designing something from scratch off you - you'll actually be able to see the end result you're working towards, then you just need to work out how to get there.

    Far too many people set out to make the game of their dreams straight away and quickly become disenchanted and give up. Start simple, build up a solid grounding, then try to make your dream game!
    Sprites, collusion, music detection is a piece of cake to learn. Under 3 hours and most people can understand it. The difficult thing is to incorporate graphics, EDIT COURTESY OF X-13: PREVENT security holes, and futuristicly clever AI.
    Last edited by Sunnyknight; 24th June 2013 at 01:29 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunnyknight View Post
    The difficult thing is to incorporate graphics, security holes, and futuristicly clever AI.
    Why would you incorporate security holes?

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    Quote Originally Posted by X-13 View Post
    Why would you incorporate security holes?
    Fail typo. Missed the word PREVENT.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunnyknight View Post
    Sprites, collusion, music detection is a piece of cake to learn. Under 3 hours and most people can understand it. The difficult thing is to incorporate graphics, EDIT COURTESY OF X-13: PREVENT security holes, and futuristicly clever AI.
    Well I'm sure @Rawns won't mind me saying that as he's a n00b to this, "futuristic AI" is a long way off. And BTW, sprites are graphics

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    Christ, i miss out one word and i get slandered for it. Sprities are basic graphics. A dot can be interpreted as a sprite. A line can be interpreted as a sprite. You try calling 3d rendered models a sprite. Yes it's a long long way out, but it's what he should be striving for. To do get as far as that, and not stay 2d, you need a team of at least 5 (as me and my group did in uni and got a A16 (highest grade possible)). Otherwise, 2d is as far as he'll go.

    Using Engines such as Unreal or Crysis can also help along the way for his game.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunnyknight View Post
    Using Engines such as Unreal or Crysis can also help along the way for his game.
    Not at this point thought.

    High end, 3D rendered games aren't good for when you're learning coding.

    Start basic, then work your way up to CryEngine.
    Last edited by X-13; 24th June 2013 at 01:55 PM.

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