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Educational Software Thread, GIMP or Photoshop in Technical; Firstly, maybe try out photoshop elements, this may have all you need. We also use Serif Photoplus, looks a little ...
  1. #16
    woody's Avatar
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    Re: GIMP or Photoshop

    Firstly, maybe try out photoshop elements, this may have all you need. We also use Serif Photoplus, looks a little like photoshop and many of the menus are similar, but obviously not quite as powerful. Still does all the stuff you would want though.

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    Re: GIMP or Photoshop

    Personally I use GIMP, as it's nice to use the same application on Linux and Windows. The same reason I use firefox and gaim.

    We have GIMP and Photoshop Elements both installed.

    Then people decide what they want to use.

    Regards

    Martin.

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    GTK open/save dialog allows restricted users to view all the network and local drives
    I was just about to post about this when i noticed the thread. I've been looking into GIMP on the network as well but once i noticed that it ignored policies to ban the C: drive i was put off.

    Paint.net 3.8 seems to have most features that we need accross the school, it's certainly as good as Elements 2 which we are looking to replace but i was hoping to avoid paying for PS.


    @ budgester: i'm with you most of the way except GAIM i hate that app i much prefer amsn.
    Last edited by cookie_monster; 15th February 2008 at 01:43 PM.

  4. #19
    Jona's Avatar
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    Great link to Gimpshop Geoff, thanks unfortunatly you got the link wrong it's: http://www.gimpshop.com/

  5. Thanks to Jona from:

    Sylv3r (16th February 2008)

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    I was just about to post about this when i noticed the thread. I've been looking into GIMP on the network as well but once i noticed that it ignored policies to ban the C: drive i was put off.
    I used to think like this, but recently I've come around to the idea that there isn't any point in restricting access as long as the permissions are set correctly. I've asked here and in other places and nobody has really come up with any reason why it's bad.

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    cookie_monster's Avatar
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    Some apps require writable areas on the C: drive Homestudio is one, these areas are easier to find if students can freely browse the directories. Also it makes it much easier for students to determine what software is running on the box including apps that you would prefer they couldn't see. It just adds another layer of security if they can't freely look around.

  8. #22

    ZeroHour's Avatar
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    I have to say though we gave our students CS3 last summer and they are turning out some amazing stuff. If you give them photoshop then it teaches them the general industrial standard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cookie_monster View Post
    Some apps require writable areas on the C: drive Homestudio is one, these areas are easier to find if students can freely browse the directories. Also it makes it much easier for students to determine what software is running on the box including apps that you would prefer they couldn't see. It just adds another layer of security if they can't freely look around.

    Ahh yes, the security by obscurity method.


    If you give them photoshop then it teaches them the general industrial standard.
    The problem is that we are in the education industry, not the graphic design industry. Teaching a specific application is not training to be 'in industry'.
    I think photoshop is too over the top for schools. I agree that if I were a 30k p/a graphic designer, I'd use the best commercial tool available. But for schools the difference in functionality between PS and gimp isn't worth the difference in price, esp taking TCO into consideration.PS now (with CS3) requires much higher system specifications than previous versions, and in the hands of untrained teachers/students can produce horrendously large file sizes. In comparison GIMP can run on much lower spec (I've seen it running reasonable on an eeepc) and some very high quality work can be produced with GIMP.

  10. #24

    ZeroHour's Avatar
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    As schools we should prepare pupils for the real world. I can only see benefits in having years of experience before you go to university/work rather then having to relearn photoshop then. The pupils most effected by this are the ones that really do have a strong interest in design and could very easily go into further education/work with design in mind. I personally would have liked to have been taught photoshop in school as it took time to learn the power within.
    Yes cost can be a issue for schools and if its out of your reach its out of your reach but if you can get the budget for it I would go with it as it will only prove to aid the pupils mentioned. You dont need to nessarily buy it for everywhere but at least give the pupils interested in design the best chance to get a head start in their potential future career.

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    If you take that perspective then you'd be teaching LaTex to your mathematicians and MatLab to your physicists, IMO it's good enough to teach an understanding of the subject and get the grades.

  12. #26
    mark's Avatar
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    The principles used and the structure of menus is similar across apps, most seem to want to emulate the PS standard - so learning GIMP _is_ learning skills that can be used in industry imho. Better in fact, if you can get used to several, rather than be dependant on one apps system for doing things.

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    I disagree with using GIMP. If you teach your students a subject like Graphic Design then you should use the industry standard, regardless. The industry standard is what the professionals in the industry use, and your students are the next professionals.

    If your courses don't rely on image manipulation and vector graphics software then I can see where you might choose something else like GIMP or a cheaper than Photoshop equivalent but otherwise I would say go for Photoshop if you can afford it.

    Regardless of how similar GIMP is, employers don't want GIMP; employers want Photoshop and the industry standard software. Software such as MatLab are not a secondary school taught specialism, but more suited to University degree teaching.

  14. #28


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    ... and students in football classes should wear a specific brand of professional footballers boots regardless of whether standard football boots could be used to teach a technique.

    Plenty of schools use MSAccess because it meets the standard for the course as set by the examination board, but it is rarely chosen in industry over MSSQL/MySQL/Oracle. Gimp does what is requires for GCSE/Alevel graphic design and therefore it meets the standard for the course.

    I don't think that schools should be expected, or even encouraged to meet the costs of a niche industry because only a small portion of a GCSE/Alevel design course is going to require image manipulation that goes beyond cropping and enlarging. If a piece of work is has been image manipulated using the higher features of PS/GIMP it may not even be regarded as the students 'own work' by the exam board, more like the programmers work.

  15. #29
    torledo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CyberNerd View Post
    ... and students in football classes should wear a specific brand of professional footballers boots regardless of whether standard football boots could be used to teach a technique.

    Plenty of schools use MSAccess because it meets the standard for the course as set by the examination board, but it is rarely chosen in industry over MSSQL/MySQL/Oracle. Gimp does what is requires for GCSE/Alevel graphic design and therefore it meets the standard for the course.

    I don't think that schools should be expected, or even encouraged to meet the costs of a niche industry because only a small portion of a GCSE/Alevel design course is going to require image manipulation that goes beyond cropping and enlarging. If a piece of work is has been image manipulated using the higher features of PS/GIMP it may not even be regarded as the students 'own work' by the exam board, more like the programmers work.
    What exactly is a niche industry - the graphic design business. While there are any different functions within graphic design and print industry....photoshop as one or two people have said IS an industry standard within the field. Unfortunately it's not good enough for students to learn something that looks and sounds like photoshop....not that gimp does anything of the sorts. As for you're argument about the work of programmers, yes it's a hell of an achievement by the legions of programmers and sometimes with PS you do get the feeling the abilities of the programm is what is creating the final output rather than you're own technical and artistic ability. But professionals aren't so hit and miss with the programme...they know exactly what they're doing to create the result they're looking for. Most photographic work is gentle retouching not polarize effects left, right and center as is often the case at GCSE. IF you're going to teach photoshop don't teach the bells and whistles crap.

    Also saying there are equivalent apps to photoshop is saying having experience of using various cheap and cheerful backup applications is going to prepare you to work as a netbackup or TSM professional, it does nothing of the sort - these applications have there own command-line arguments and quirks that merely knowing A N Other backup application is enough....it isn't, not by a long chalk.

    Same with photoshop, it has it's own unique functions and features that require product-specific experience. A user of gimp is in no better a position to undertake photoshop training than someone who's never touched a 'design' application any more complicated than paint.

    You have a point about the cost, and the requirements at GCSE level, and many pupils will have no need to reacquaint with photoshop at A-level, degree or in employement again. So it's a bit of a waste, but i agree with the principle of using industry standards. Particularly in respect to web design and video editing....all these macs all over the place in schools and how many are using Final cut express or After effects ? It's criminal the opportunities that are being missed with using macs.

    btw i agree with another poster - fireworks is fab. And should be treated as an industry standard for web image design. fireworks is used extensively by web designers worth their salt, it could be argued fireworks has a better claim to being a staple in GCSE over photoshop.

    After all web design is anything but 'niche'

  16. #30


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    I meant that computer graphics are a small area of a design course compared for example to the scientific industry. Yet 'industry standard' scientific applications are not taught in schools because teachers are expected to teach the fundamentals of science rather than the bells and whistles.

    I really don't think that for simple work that photoshop should be considered the tool of choice these days. Several years ago, photoshop *was* the only tool that could do most image manipulation work, but things have moved on and the level that students need to work at do not justify the complexity of the program, especially if teachers are bound by exam board rules not to let the advanced features 'create' the piece of work.

    If schools are teaching courses for specific applications, eg a "how to use photoshop course" then of course it's irreplaceable. (except you then find the teachers say "we want elements" cos its easier to use.....)

    I agree web design is anything but 'niche', it is a large field. CMS usage, theme creation, databases, and a plethora of different languages and standards - The real standards like HTML,XML etc

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