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e-Safety Thread, Facebook --- Protection vs Intrusion in School Administration; We take our e-safety here very very strongly, as should most schools, but where does the responsibility of the school ...
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    linuxgirlie's Avatar
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    Facebook --- Protection vs Intrusion

    We take our e-safety here very very strongly, as should most schools, but where does the responsibility of the school stop?

    Does it extend to posting outside of school?(It is banned in school) Only if they took the footage on the school grounds? If they are a student under 18? If they are seen in uniform? If they have identified other students? If they are behaving inappropriately?(drunk, posing inappropriately) If it is something they do in their private life? (though not that private if on facebook.) Only if they mention the school by name?

    I suppose the question is, where should the line between protection and intrusion be drawn?

    Where do you draw the line?

    Thanks,

    Jo

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    FN-GM's Avatar
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    It’s a very grey area in our school.

    On a personal level, anything on facebook school don’t see appropriate that was carried out side school, i don’t think school should be involved. Nor do I think the school should be actively looking on students profiles. Anything a school should find for what ever reason shouldn't be delt with by the school and should be referred to parents.
    Last edited by FN-GM; 5th July 2010 at 09:54 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by linuxgirlie View Post
    We take our e-safety here very very strongly, as should most schools, but where does the responsibility of the school stop?

    Does it extend to posting outside of school?(It is banned in school) Only if they took the footage on the school grounds? If they are a student under 18? If they are seen in uniform? If they have identified other students? If they are behaving inappropriately?(drunk, posing inappropriately) If it is something they do in their private life? (though not that private if on facebook.) Only if they mention the school by name?

    I suppose the question is, where should the line between protection and intrusion be drawn?

    Where do you draw the line?

    Thanks,

    Jo
    IIRC the rule of thumb is "if something that's a cause for concern (harm (however defined) to the kid) comes to out attention we can't ignore it". We'd do something. What we'd do is up to our Child Safety Officer.

    If they were wearing school uniform and thus representing the school/bringing the school into disrepute, Words Would Be Had. (s' in the school rules that thou shalt not indulge in shenanigans while in school uniform (or similar)).

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    theeldergeek
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    Quote Originally Posted by FN-GM View Post
    It’s a very grey area in our school.

    On a personal level, anything on facebook school don’t see appropriate that was carried out side school, i don’t think school should be involved. Nor do I think the school should be actively looking on students profiles. Anything a school should find for what ever reason shouldn't be delt with by the school and should be referred to parents.
    But if the parents ask the school for help, i.e. child being cyberbullied by a fellow student? It's all taking place outside of school, does the school get involved?

    I'm come from 'old school' days when, if you misbehaved outside of school, the school still got involved. If you were caught smoking outside of school, the school got involved. If you were in trouble with the Police, the school got involved.

    Admittedly, cyber-bullying will invariably be taking place from within the confines of the family home, and being no expert on the matter, I can only say whilst I think schools should be involved, I'm not not sure how they could be involved.

    Having said that, I think schools should play a much bigger part in a child's social upbringing. If a child is going off the rails outside of school, then I think as a society, we should be getting schools involved so that the child has a clear path which to follow, not a two tier situation which we have now where once outside the school gates, a child can forget the rules as many do so easily.

    Kids know the rules in school, i.e. no bullying via SMS, but once out of the school gates, that 'rule' no longer applies (OK, so there are other rules, or laws, which do) so kids have a different set of rules to follow, rules which some parents do not enforce, e.g. Little Johnny should learn to stick up for himself, so Little Johnny has all the protection the school can afford him during school hours, but none after the bell goes?

    There is a fine line of course between being involved and interfering, but with so-called "social networking" being such a massive part of young people's lives, I do not see any harm in them continuing to follow school rules long after the bell has gone.

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    linuxgirlie's Avatar
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    I'm glad I'm not the only one who feels this is such a grey area!

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    This is a Safeguarding issue, rather than an e-Safety one and it is your Child Proectection officer who should be in the know; if they don't they should be seeking advice from the LA.

    A school's Safeguarding responsibility is for everything that occurs on the school premises. It is also the school's responsibilty to ensure that the students have the knowledge to keep themselves safe off the premises.

    However, as with physical bullying between pupils, cyber-bulling occurring outside school is still the responsibility of the school. The school may take more time to become aware of it, but once they are aware they must take action regardless of how and where the bullying is done.

    Bullying between pupils, or of staff by pupils, is bullying regardless of how it is done and the school must deal with it.

    As for inappropriate behaviour: it depends on your AUP. "Bringing the school, it's staff or students into disrepute" is often a clause. Beyond that, beyond educating students there is probaly little more you can do.

    Employers and universities routinely checking facebook before interview is something they dhould be aware of.
    Last edited by elsiegee40; 5th July 2010 at 11:24 AM.

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    Thanks Elsiegee, we do, do all of that. But it is not bullying or other stuff, our child protection officer deals with all that, we also train all the students and staff, and regularly do re-training and awareness courses, that sort of stuff is easy and straight forward to deal with. It is the grey stuff I am worried about.

    For example what do you do if say a parent mentions they have seen a friend of their child in pictures drunk and at the pub/party when they are clearly 14/15/16/17 or seeing a member of staff drunk in a photo etc etc

    These are clearly their private life, so should the school get involved...or should it be shrugged off as it's their private life nothing to do with us...that's why I was asking where the line was drawn.

    The above example we haven't actually had this at our school yet(fingers crossed), but it was something I would like to research in case we do, as like people are saying social networking and the posting of these kind of pictures/videos are getting more common especially friends tagging photos rather than the person uploading them.
    Also the school staff etc are changing and they may have pictures uploaded prior to any training, maybe during their uni days.....what do you do then....you can't ask for them to take them down?

    Thanks,

    Jo
    Last edited by linuxgirlie; 5th July 2010 at 12:31 PM.

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    elsiegee40's Avatar
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    These things usually are brought to your attention by a parent unfortunately.

    Regardless of what occurs, the school must keep a record of the concerns raised by the reporting parent and the actions they took. If the incident does get escalated, at least the school can prove when it was reported and that they've recorded their decisions (even if it was to do nothing)

    If staff are involved it's for the HT to deal with. Subject to your Staff code of conduct and/or AUP, I would think that being seen drunk on Facebook is quite likely to be a disciplinary offence (verbal warning at least) for failure to act in a professional manner. Staff can get drunk, but not if they bring the school into disrepute and teachers have been sacked for those drunken FB pictures.

    At the very least the staff need to be given the privacy settings document I put in this thread eSafety Resources and told to act on it immediately.

    If your AUP and Code of Conduct are not up to scratch they need to be sorted as a priority as they are checked by OfSTED. Both schools I'm involved with (my employer and the one where I'm a governor) have gone through this recently... it was started by the governor school as we realised that without having the disrepute bit formally in writing it would be hard to discipline staff who over-stepped the mark.

    New staff at both schools get an e-Safety/Data Protection talk as part of their induction. It's used to point out that these issues are only partly about Safeguarding the other part is about protecting themselves and their careers. It's also used to point out the school's expectation of them. So far I've always had a good response from the staff involved and they understand that I'm more than willing to help make sure they are as clear as possible when it comes to what they've posted.

    When it comes to pupils, it really is an education thing. Keep trying to get them to sort out their privacy settings and make them understand that interviewers really do check them out. If concerns are reported they should go straight to your Child Protection officer (probably the HT) who will decide if there's a Safeguarding issue and will follow the school's policy for action if necessary.

    I've attached our Incident Recording form which may be of use to your school.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by elsiegee40; 5th July 2010 at 03:52 PM.

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    linuxgirlie's Avatar
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    Thanks, this is all very helpful, we are planning on doing another re-training soon for staff and the main focus will be facebook, so I will forward your information on to our e-safety team to make sure they include this information.

    We have just had our Ofsted and gained an Outstanding, so all the AUP/CoC information is perfectly sound.

    I still am in two minds about Protection vs Intrusion especially as most adults and children would probably think its intrusion into their personal lives, even if you explain that your trying to protect them. I think in this situation, the only thing you can do is cover yourself, by making sure everyone knows the costs of posting their lives online.

    Thanks again,

    Jo

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    enjay's Avatar
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    Surely the school's response to a photo on Facebook should be the same as its response to a kid (or adult) who was seen in the park with a bottle of super-strength cider (whatever that response may be) and should be handled by the same people, e.g. Tutors or Heads of Year. Same goes for cyber-bullying.

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