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Blue Skies Thread, Chrome will bring about the ICT revolution in schools in General; I wonder what this could be....
  1. #241


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    I wonder what this could be.


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    The first fake leather laptop!?


  3. #243


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    Finally a Chromebook with a decent screen resolution!

    In depth: Meet the new Samsung Chromebook 2 « Computer World

    The Samsung Chromebook 2 actually comes in two different models: one with an 11.6-in. display, like its predecessor, and one that packs a larger 13.3-in. screen. Both models will go on sale sometime in April; the 11-in. system will cost $320 while the 13-in. device will run $400.

    Under the hood, both models use Samsung Exynos Octa 5 processors with 4GB of RAM (the 11" model is clocked at 1.9GHz while the 13" is at 2.1GHz). Sound a little unusual? It is: The Exynos Octa 5 is an ARM-based chip -- the same type of chip typically used in smartphones and tablets. That's the sort of setup most Chromebooks used to use, but the majority of the newer models have shifted to Haswell-based architectures instead.

    While Haswell chips are generally considered to be more power-efficient than their ARM-based cousins, stamina doesn't appear to be a cause for concern with Samsung's new offerings: The 11-in. Chromebook 2 promises a full 8 hours of battery life per charge while the larger 13-in. model is listed for 8.5 hours.

    About those displays: The 11-in. Chromebook 2 uses the standard 1366-x-768 resolution seen in most Chromebook devices, including the previous-gen Samsung Chromebook model. The 13" Chromebook 2, however, steps things up with a 1920x1080 "full HD" display -- a welcome bump from the bare minimum we've come to expect on non-Pixel-level machines. That said, Samsung has confirmed to me that both models use TN panels as opposed to higher-quality IPS displays (which is still par for the course with Chromebooks, with the Pixel and the HP Chromebook 11 being the only exceptions).




    Hopefully the additional bloatware Samsung has pre-installed can be removed easily.

    New Samsung Chromebook 2 introduces bloatware to Chrome OS « Geek.com

    Where Samsung goes, other hardware manufacturers are sure to follow. This method of including paid apps isn’t quite as invasive and often downright offensive as what some Windows OEMs have done in the past, but it sets the precedent for bloatware to come to Chrome OS from every direction.

  4. #244
    gshaw's Avatar
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    Seems like ChromeOS is morphing into Windows in slow motion

  5. #245

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    Quote Originally Posted by gshaw View Post
    Seems like ChromeOS is morphing into Windows in slow motion



    ChromeOS was 'because people don't want Windows' it seems they do as the UI, compatibility and now bad vendor habits converge

  6. #246
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    Not to mention the ever increasing CPU and memory requirements on the hardware side

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    Intel and Google boast 11-hour battery life with upcoming Chromebooks « Ars Technica

    Asus, Acer, Toshiba, and Lenovo will be the first PC OEMs to ship Bay Trail-based Chromebooks, not counting a basic education-focused reference design that Intel showed off during the presentation. Asus is offering both 11-inch (C200) and 13-inch (C300) Bay Trail Chromebooks with dual-core Bay Trail Celeron chips (the N2830, to be exact), 2GB of RAM, 16GB of solid-state storage, 1366×768 displays, and 802.11ac. The 11-inch model weighs 2.5 pounds, while the 13-inch model is 3.1 pounds, and the lineup will reportedly start at $250. The Toshiba and Acer models weren't shown, and we don't yet know anything about specific specifications, pricing, or availability for either of them.

    Lenovo's Chromebooks are a little more intriguing. The company is offering two models, the N20 and the N20p. Both use 11.6-inch 1366×768 displays, quad-core Bay Trail Celeron chips, 2GB or 4GB of RAM, 16GB of solid-state storage, and about eight hours of battery life. The difference between the two is that the N20p integrates a Yoga-like flexible hinge and a touchscreen that can be flipped backward (though it won't sit flush against the bottom of the laptop like the regular Yogas will). The standard N20 will start at $279 when it's available in July, and the N20p will start at $329 in August.

    The event also played up Chrome OS' momentum in the marketplace, though no one who spoke used specific sales numbers. They chose instead to focus on other metrics—that seven of the top 20 best-selling laptops on Amazon are Chromebooks, that the Asus Chromebox has been the best-selling desktop on Amazon since it was introduced, and that Amazon customer reviews on these devices are generally favorable. Eight major PC OEMs are now selling Chrome OS devices, and they're available in 20 countries (with nine more countries to follow).


    ^ What's the point in having a screen that can't fold all the way back like on the Yogas running Windows?


  8. #248


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    Hands-on: Acer’s speedy Core i3 C720 Chromebook « The Next Web

    Unless you’re using a Google Chromebook Pixel with a Core i5 processor, Chromebooks are generally pokey computing affairs. While loading Chrome apps and sites isn't exactly performance intensive, the snail-like speed of those Chromebooks becomes noticeable next to mid-level Windows or OS X notebooks. The Acer C720 removes that sluggishness in a $349 package–far less expensive than the Pixel’s $1,299 price at launch.

    Thanks to the notebook’s 4th-gen Intel Core i3 chip, the Chrome browser launched and loaded more quickly than any other non-Pixel Chromebook I've seen. Launching Google apps–including multiple Drive documents–was a breeze with nary a hiccup. Google even pre-bookmarked a racing game and adventure game onto the C720 for testing. While the Google Drive doc tabs were still open, I launched both games. Even while loading the adventure game, I saw no lag or stuttering while skidding around SKID Racer track.

    The Acer won’t replace an ultrabook or MacBook Air, but at $349, it’s a solid performer. But, that price point means that you’re not going to get the high-quality screens found on those other devices. At 1366 x 768 pixels, it’s hard not to notice the lower resolution compared to higher-end Windows and OS X notebooks. It’s not a horrible experience, but once you've become accustomed to a higher definition display, it’s hard to go back.

    The build quality of the case is also on par with its $349 price tag. It doesn't feel cheap or flimsy, but it is plastic and feels like a notebook from five years ago. The keyboard felt solid, but probably a little too recessed for my taste. And finally, the trackpad was responsive, but heavy taps created the tell-tale “thwak” noise of a plastic construction.




    Chromebook manufacturers really need to start using better quality screens!

    Yesterday's Intel-Google event was an eye opener, or perhaps eye-strainer for anyone looking for Chromebooks with better screens. During the Q&A, PC execs dodged a couple questions about the displays, the majority of which are 1366 x 768 resolution and dim 200-nit brightness. Resolution matters less when panels are bright and deliver consistent color and contrast from wide viewing angles. Chromebooks consistently ship with the best keyboards on any laptop for any price, and the trackpads are exceptional, too. The displays suck. Only two models are good enough. Most newer models change nothing. (Source)
    Last edited by Arthur; 8th May 2014 at 02:13 AM.

  9. #249

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arthur View Post
    Hands-on: Acer’s speedy Core i3 C720 Chromebook « The Next Web







    Chromebook manufacturers really need to start using better quality screens!



    Smirk, chrome and web based were supposed to be better as they were more efficient but they still need a mainline cpu ro be decent. Windows 8 even seems to handle web pages better on a lower end cpu.

  10. #250
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    Does seem odd how many of these Chromebooks are cheap and nasty, considering how good the Nexus tablets are in comparison. Also those Chromebooks aren't that cheap really considering there's no Windows licence to cover in the price, someone's making a nice profit on them!

  11. #251

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arthur View Post
    Chromebook manufacturers really need to start using better quality screens!
    Change that to Laptop manufacturers and I agree. I'm sick of 1366x768 resolution screens. They're worse now than they were when I bought my uni laptop, years ago (in terms of resolution at least).

  12. #252
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    I own a chromebook nowadays, ironically as well, after asking advice on here and other forums and having major misgivings about HP in the past, I plumped for a white HP one! Shock Horror !

    From my experience of it, I think their not bad, I would even say its "Good" here but there are a few "Buts" as already pointed out,

    RAM is a massive issue, 2gb isnt great at all, every bit of research I did reported back that they slowed down on 2gb so I wanted to avoid that, 4gb is generally the acceptable minimum amount of RAM these days, thats what drove me to HP as it is the only 4gb model in the UK , UK lines and availability are very poor too compared to US in Retail, they dont offer the 4gb variants with the models that you get in the US.

    Have to agree with @localzuk too, resolution is an issue too, I had a 9 year old Sony Vaio laptop in work until it died a few months back, I mourned it as, this thing was made in 2005 was top of the line and had a 1920x1200 resolution, you think that manufacturers would have cottoned on and caught up with that at least now as a standard, 1366x768 isnt good and I spend a good whack of my time pushing tabs to the Lounge TV here to get a decent size with the chromecast, the alternative resolution available on mine which is higher, looks horrible with the screen as well which doesnt help.

    I have a Celeron based unit and thats strangely not offputting on this model, as it doesnt behave like previous celerons i.e. awful, I wouldnt know about ARM based ones though here, thats something I would avoid on a personal choice basis

  13. #253
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    Quote Originally Posted by localzuk View Post
    Change that to Laptop manufacturers and I agree. I'm sick of 1366x768 resolution screens. They're worse now than they were when I bought my uni laptop, years ago (in terms of resolution at least).
    In Google's position trying to gain market share would've made sense to mandate a certain level of quality to distance themselves from "legacy" kit. Would've been a strong selling point if they could say the money saved on the OS was going towards higher quality components. As it stands that doesn't seem to be the case.

  14. #254

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    I like these, not sure why but I do, quite cheap too

    Hands-on: LG Chromebase review - Pocket-lint

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    Quote Originally Posted by gshaw View Post
    As it stands that doesn't seem to be the case.
    I thought computers were meant to improve over time, but it looks like HP has different ideas. The second gen. HP Chromebook 11 is worse than its predecessor in almost every way.

    HP Chromebook 11 G2 on the way, for better or worse « Liliputing

    HP launched its first 11 inch Chromebook in late 2013, offering a portable Chrome OS laptop with a low-power Samsung Exynos 5 dual-core CPU, a nice IPS display, and a compact, attractive case designed with input from Google.

    Now it looks like HP is redesigning the HP Chromebook 11… although it’s not clear that the new HP Chromebook 11 G2 is an improvement over the original.

    Like last year’s model, the new HP Chromebook 11 G2 features a Samsung Exynos 5250 dual-core ARM Cortex-A15 CPU, an 11.6 inch, 1366 x 768 pixel display, 2GB of RAM, and 16GB of storage.

    But the new model doesn't have the same IPS display with wide viewing angles as its predecessor. And while the original HP Chromebook 11 weighed 2.3 pounds, the new model starts at 2.95 pounds. It’s also 0.8 inches thick instead of 0.6 inches.

    HP has also redesigned the case to make it look more like the larger HP Chromebook 14 and less like a tiny, cheap sibling to the Google Chromebook Pixel.

    In other words, the new model is thicker and heavier than last year’s Chromebook 11, isn’t any faster, and has a screen that some folks will find inferior. Hopefully that means HP also plans to offer the Chromebook 11 G2 for a lower price.

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