+ Post New Thread
Page 2 of 12 FirstFirst 123456 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 177
Blue Skies Thread, Open Source Schools' Miles Berry offers a radical response to the ICT funding cuts in General; I wonder if this guy ever worked a day as a IT Tech in a School? A few of my ...
  1. #16
    jamesfed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Reading
    Posts
    2,214
    Thank Post
    138
    Thanked 347 Times in 293 Posts
    Rep Power
    90
    I wonder if this guy ever worked a day as a IT Tech in a School?

    A few of my thoughts are-
    1. Don't buy any software.
    Its a nasty world out there where buissnesses use Microsoft Office, where professional designers use Photoshop so how is using (what is currently) the free alternatives listed going to help our students?

    2. Make use of web-based applications.
    We use Windows Live@Edu - its Outlook based and has Sky Drive with Office Live - the students still don't use it much but those who don't have Office at home love it. Oh and btw its FREEEEE

    Drupal for your school website
    Many schools already use CMS based websites like WordPress/Joomla!

    3. Don't bother replacing your computers.
    Many of our PCs are 5 years old and going strong and I belive this is the case in many schools.

    4. Allow the pupils to use their own devices.
    Security (both physical and digital) spring to mind - what happens when little Jonnys PC gets stolen and Mum/Dad try to sue the school for not protecting it?

    5. Take control of your Internet connection.
    One of the few points I agree on

    6. Don't buy, or subscribe, to any digital resources.
    The web is good, Wikipedia is good however many resources which have been tailored to the lessons that staff teach cost money because the company behind it has put the effort in to make it 100% relivant.

    7. Don't pay for CPD.
    And as such all the IT Staff from schools leave to the privet sector because we feel that our development will be better handled by corps.

    9. Use volunteer support.
    Its hard enough to find decent Techs let alone ask little Jonnys parents to try setting up a web server.

    10. Share your expertise and creativity.
    Edu Geek?

    Sorry for any of the bad spellings in this little rant

  2. Thanks to jamesfed from:

    Roberto (21st July 2010)

  3. #17

    tmcd35's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Norfolk
    Posts
    5,968
    Thank Post
    894
    Thanked 983 Times in 807 Posts
    Blog Entries
    9
    Rep Power
    343
    Like most of these things the ideas/ideals are good and I'd generally support them. The problem, as all ways, is the devil is in the detail. On paper this sounds like 'yeah, if I follow this plan I can save $$$ from my ICT budget'. In reality the cost of implementing some of these ideas - staff training, new wifi infrastructure, etc - mean for a lot of schools the status quo may actually be cheaper.

    Besides the biggest single software cost any school faces involve using an MIS that doesn't require a certain software mix. And since the offending MIS provider commands an 80% market share our potential costs saving by going FOSS are pulled from under us right there!

  4. #18
    joe90bass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    S Wales
    Posts
    1,355
    Thank Post
    329
    Thanked 107 Times in 96 Posts
    Rep Power
    51
    Quote Originally Posted by tmcd35 View Post
    Besides the biggest single software cost any school faces involve using an MIS that doesn't require a certain software mix. And since the offending MIS provider commands an 80% market share our potential costs saving by going FOSS are pulled from under us right there!
    Perfect excuse to this this smilie!

  5. #19

    beeswax's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    2,285
    Thank Post
    285
    Thanked 225 Times in 153 Posts
    Rep Power
    131
    I was just wondering what the ICT funding would be for schools who have been kicked back by the whole BSF process? Will they still receive the equivalent money to a managed service school? The current coalition government has been quiet when asked about ICT funding. Does OS then become a viable option? I know training will be necessary for a lot of schools, but there will be a lot of schools who need training so economies of scale may kick in.

  6. #20
    TheLibrarian
    Guest
    9. Use volunteer support. So empowering your network manager is great if you've got a network manager, but what if not? Perhaps a skills audit of your pupils parents might be helpful? There's more to parental engagement than hearing readers, going on trips or running fete stalls: it's likely that in all but the smallest schools there will be parents who work in IT, many of whom may have skill levels in excess of those that schools could afford to employ and would be only to pleased to support the school in a way that improved its educational provision and used their own expertise. Parents helping with website content? Parents sorting out networking? E-learning governors? Why not?
    Err... CRB? Who's paying for these volunteers to be CRB checked?

  7. #21

    beeswax's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    2,285
    Thank Post
    285
    Thanked 225 Times in 153 Posts
    Rep Power
    131
    Quote Originally Posted by TheLibrarian View Post
    Err... CRB? Who's paying for these volunteers to be CRB checked?
    It's the Big Society.

  8. #22

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    10
    Thank Post
    1
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Rep Power
    0

    Hmmm, well, not wanting to go against the flow

    But why change the habit of a lifetime.

    No, going "open source first" (plenty of room for pragmatism here) isn't going to be easy.

    No, in the immediate future on a school by school basis it isn't going to save money.

    Yes, in the longer term (how we should be thinking) going open source will save money for everyone involved.

    How to achieve some of Mile's suggestions? Collaborate? It's the new way. Use volunteers? But they are hard to find? Right here, right now: any schools in Oxfordshire (maybe neighbouring counties around northern Oxfordshire) want to do this, I'll pay my CRB and provide expertise for free, both strategic to SMT and governors and technical.

    And yes, it can be done, and with the right school it won't even be that long before you see results.

  9. #23


    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    2,286
    Thank Post
    123
    Thanked 347 Times in 286 Posts
    Blog Entries
    4
    Rep Power
    140
    Quote Originally Posted by putt1ck View Post
    No, in the immediate future on a school by school basis it isn't going to save money.
    Particularly if you consider the costs of getting technical staff appropriately skilled up - which will be required.

    Except that one of the points suggests money is no longer wasted on such things. I guess replacing staff needs to be factored in, instead. Or extra pay and self-development time to skill themselves up, as well as bringing in others to cover time that staff are away.

    Yes, in the longer term (how we should be thinking) going open source will save money for everyone involved.
    Will it? If your technical staff are skilled up to use open source, and properly configure it, do you not think there's a potential for them to be looking for a better paid position which will appreciate their skills more? And that the demand for people skilled in open-source will increase, meaning that the pay for such positions will have to increase to attract them?

    I can see some very direct savings from open-source, but there are also added costs involved.

    How to achieve some of Mile's suggestions? Collaborate? It's the new way. Use volunteers? But they are hard to find? Right here, right now: any schools in Oxfordshire (maybe neighbouring counties around northern Oxfordshire) want to do this, I'll pay my CRB and provide expertise for free, both strategic to SMT and governors and technical.
    Great. So are you available for the working day of schools? Or are the staff at the school expected to sacrifice their time outside of work for this collaboration?

    And yes, it can be done, and with the right school it won't even be that long before you see results.
    No disagreement here, but suggesting that this applies to all schools strikes me as being somewhat naive. A very good team, with a very good set of staff in the school, and the right number of volunteers with knowledge of the individual school as well as many other factors would be required.

  10. Thanks to jamesb from:

    Butters (20th July 2010)

  11. #24
    TheLibrarian
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by putt1ck View Post
    No, going "open source first" (plenty of room for pragmatism here) isn't going to be easy.
    In some cases impossible, AFAIK you can't get drivers for Promethean IWB's for Ubuntu - at least they aren't listed as a download on the Promethean site (cursory glance).
    That's just one thing right now that kills going to Ubuntu on teacher laptops / desktops.

    How many of the online testing facilities that require a program will also provide that program for Ubuntu? - Yes I am aware of Wine, but I don't know how easy that would be to use from a pupil point of view or even if the emulation would work for the online testing programs.

    Quote Originally Posted by putt1ck View Post
    Yes, in the longer term (how we should be thinking) going open source will save money for everyone involved.
    There's not a great deal of point thinking "Open Source" that far into the future if exam boards, hardware manufacturers and content creation publishers don't take up support of Linux.

    Quote Originally Posted by putt1ck View Post
    I'll pay my CRB and provide expertise for free
    That is very public spirited of you and very commendable.

  12. #25

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    10
    Thank Post
    1
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Rep Power
    0
    @jamesfed: I hear those arguments 10 years ago, they were weak then, they are weaker now.

    I wonder if this guy ever worked a day as a IT Tech in a School?
    Yes, Miles has supported people in school, while also being a deputy; more relevant to what follows, yes I have, primary and secondary, and continue to provide pro bono advice to my sister-in-law's primary in Leicestershire.

    1. Don't buy any software.
    Its a nasty world out there where buissnesses use Microsoft Office, where professional designers use Photoshop so how is using (what is currently) the free alternatives listed going to help our students?
    Well, I work for a business that employs 400 people. We use OpenOffice. We also increasingly use GIMP/Scribus/Inkscape. And FreeMind/GanttProject/Digikam/K3B/...

    More importantly. pupils at school today will not be using that software when they get to the workplace. None of what you have in your school, none of what I have deployed here. At least not in a recognisable form. A Year 7 pupil the school does well by has 10 years before they go into the workplace, the Year 11 another 5. The Year 11 pupil that is going straight into the workplace (a) probably isn't going to be using MS Office or Adobe Photoshop and (b) sure wasn't listening in the lessons when they were shown such tools.

    2. Make use of web-based applications.
    We use Windows Live@Edu - its Outlook based and has Sky Drive with Office Live - the students still don't use it much but those who don't have Office at home love it. Oh and btw its FREEEEE
    So is Google Apps and it's better. And older. Why didn't you ever start using that? Come to think of it, we were doing all that stuff for schools for free and more sustainably the best part of 10 years ago.

    Drupal for your school website
    Many schools already use CMS based websites like WordPress/Joomla!
    Excellent, they already use open source tools. Although Drupal and Joomla will provide more functionality than WordPress, and I'm second-guessing Miles here, but I'd imagine Drupal was suggested for its integration with all manner of lovely (free) add-ons.

    3. Don't bother replacing your computers.
    Many of our PCs are 5 years old and going strong and I belive this is the case in many schools.
    Sure, but when they can't run your big resource hog over-featured apps any more, I'm guessing you aren't considering your future strategy?

    4. Allow the pupils to use their own devices.
    Security (both physical and digital) spring to mind - what happens when little Jonnys PC gets stolen and Mum/Dad try to sue the school for not protecting it?
    Well, (a) that's an issue or not anyway for anything the child brings into school. In the case of the "use your own if you have it" policy I'd cut a deal with someone like Endsleigh to offer cheap laptop (feature phone, tablet) insurance and advise parents to take it up. Digital security is easy if you design your network sensibly.

    5. Take control of your Internet connection.
    One of the few points I agree on
    Me too, although I seem to recall many LAs being resistant to the idea.
    6. Don't buy, or subscribe, to any digital resources.
    The web is good, Wikipedia is good however many resources which have been tailored to the lessons that staff teach cost money because the company behind it has put the effort in to make it 100% relivant.
    100% relevant to a national curriculum about to be kicked into touch? We use to create resources and share them with other schools; pay once benefit everywhere. NWGfL style. This new-old collaboration thing again.

    7. Don't pay for CPD.
    And as such all the IT Staff from schools leave to the privet sector because we feel that our development will be better handled by corps.
    Hmm. Possibly you should talk to some people over here in the other sectors, where training budgets are now measured in single digits or less. Your development, in my team and everywhere else sensible, ain't about CPD, a formal backwards step in learning, but about pd; where I or your line manager see you as ready to take on a task supported by those more experienced in carrying out such that you learn in a way that is useful and applied.

    9. Use volunteer support.
    Its hard enough to find decent Techs let alone ask little Jonnys parents to try setting up a web server.
    Not to blow my own vuvuzella, but I'm pretty good. Little Jonny's parents might be IT consultants specialising in web development. Setting up an Apache box with Drupal and Joomla might be something they do every day (and in which case won't take then more than 30 minutes).

    10. Share your expertise and creativity.
    Edu Geek? No, Edu Geek is for specialist support staff working across the primary and secondary education sectors. Technical expertise and creativity needs to be shared via local partnerships, collaboration with those close enough you can go help them make the same steps, close enough that as they get into this new-old collaboration thing you create a pool of expertise in use that becomes a virtuous circle. Also put tips on Edu Geek, add pages on the Schoolforge-UK wiki and elsewhere. And get teaching staff doing the same.

    Collaboration...

  13. #26

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    10
    Thank Post
    1
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Rep Power
    0
    @TheLibrarian:

    In some cases impossible, AFAIK you can't get drivers for Promethean IWB's for Ubuntu - at least they aren't listed as a download on the Promethean site (cursory glance).
    That's just one thing right now that kills going to Ubuntu on teacher laptops / desktops.
    Sure, many people made a bad choice there. SMART and the US clone both have drivers, SMART's entire suite is available cross-platform. But I guarantee you, one call from a local authority, let alone a well-briefed ministerial aide and a driver will turn up really, really fast.

    How many of the online testing facilities that require a program will also provide that program for Ubuntu? - Yes I am aware of Wine, but I don't know how easy that would be to use from a pupil point of view or even if the emulation would work for the online testing programs.
    It would take a simple regulatory change and some programming on behalf of the providers before they were universal, but sure not a immediate fix. This is a long term thing, not a tomorrow thing.

    There's not a great deal of point thinking "Open Source" that far into the future if exam boards, hardware manufacturers and content creation publishers don't take up support of Linux.
    Well, one step at at time, but the exam boards are easy as they are regulated. Let's deal with first...

    That is very public spirited of you and very commendable.
    Why thank you, I try

  14. #27


    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    2,286
    Thank Post
    123
    Thanked 347 Times in 286 Posts
    Blog Entries
    4
    Rep Power
    140
    Quote Originally Posted by putt1ck View Post
    Well, I work for a business that employs 400 people. We use OpenOffice. We also increasingly use GIMP/Scribus/Inkscape. And FreeMind/GanttProject/Digikam/K3B/...
    School != Business.

    So is Google Apps and it's better. And older. Why didn't you ever start using that? Come to think of it, we were doing all that stuff for schools for free and more sustainably the best part of 10 years ago.
    Ah, so google apps is automatically better. I see. Isn't part of the point to evaluate different options? There are plenty of objections to cloud-sourcing as it is, and I would think that the choice was made after careful consideration, yet you simply ignore it because in your opinion 'google apps is better'.

    As for older - when did that automatically mean better?

    Excellent, they already use open source tools. Although Drupal and Joomla will provide more functionality than WordPress, and I'm second-guessing Miles here, but I'd imagine Drupal was suggested for its integration with all manner of lovely (free) add-ons.
    It's nice to know that you are the ultimate authority on open source tools, and can tell people what the best is without even knowing the situation and reasoning that led them to make their choice. Your crystal ball must be functioning well.

    Sure, but when they can't run your big resource hog over-featured apps any more, I'm guessing you aren't considering your future strategy?
    What resource hog over-featured apps?

    Well, (a) that's an issue or not anyway for anything the child brings into school. In the case of the "use your own if you have it" policy I'd cut a deal with someone like Endsleigh to offer cheap laptop (feature phone, tablet) insurance and advise parents to take it up. Digital security is easy if you design your network sensibly.
    There are other issues involved here which you seem to be ignoring. What happens if the school bully takes their laptop? If the kid sets up a wireless network with another kid, and so a virus spreads, who's responsible for cleaning it up? If something illegal is brought in, who gets to deal with it? What about when the local thief finds out that sixty laptops are left in the PE changing rooms each lesson? What about Bobby having the shiniest, best laptop on the market and Fred having an antique freebie?

    Most importantly - what about them not password protecting anything so that there's no security on the systems which they are then bringing in to school, so anyone who gets them gets everything, including the kid's facebook and e-mail accounts? Then you're telling them to bring these systems into school, which is not a secure place, and without applying any security policy across them?

    100% relevant to a national curriculum about to be kicked into touch? We use to create resources and share them with other schools; pay once benefit everywhere. NWGfL style. This new-old collaboration thing again.
    Good idea, no argument from me, but I'm not a teacher using the resources so wouldn't be my place to judge what's suitable and unsuitable anyway.

    Hmm. Possibly you should talk to some people over here in the other sectors, where training budgets are now measured in single digits or less. Your development, in my team and everywhere else sensible, ain't about CPD, a formal backwards step in learning, but about pd; where I or your line manager see you as ready to take on a task supported by those more experienced in carrying out such that you learn in a way that is useful and applied.
    Wonderful - so why exactly should I stay with your company where I'm getting no training other than informal, and being given more tasks with no obvious advancement path? What about when there's a new task to be taken on and no one has relevant skills, you hire a new person in order to train up the rest?

    Not to blow my own vuvuzella, but I'm pretty good. Little Jonny's parents might be IT consultants specialising in web development. Setting up an Apache box with Drupal and Joomla might be something they do every day (and in which case won't take then more than 30 minutes).
    And it might also be something they don't want to spend their evenings and weekends doing. Maybe they'd prefer to play a board game with little Johnny instead?

  15. #28


    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,840
    Thank Post
    343
    Thanked 263 Times in 215 Posts
    Rep Power
    121
    Quote Originally Posted by putt1ck View Post
    Not to blow my own vuvuzella, but I'm pretty good. Little Jonny's parents might be IT consultants specialising in web development. Setting up an Apache box with Drupal and Joomla might be something they do every day (and in which case won't take then more than 30 minutes).
    Erm, there is only one thing with that. You might think your good, but how do we know? How do we know that LIttle Jonny's parents are any good? Just because they are IT consultants doesn't mean they are good at their job. A little knowledge is a dangerous thing, and there is a difference between someone who is first line support and someone who is running a large network. However, both people could say they work in IT support for a large company. There still needs to be someone checking skills before anyone is let loose on a network.

    You've also made a couple of assumptions such as the OS software is better than the existing infrastructure people already have. You cant make that case without knowing the current setup schools have already. This is the KEY point to the argument, OS solutions need to be evaluated in comparison to the existing setup. Comparisons need to be made for the short and long term goals and all the costs need to be accounted for. There isn't a one solution fits all, and taking into account non technical problems such as staff interest needs to be accounted for.

    Edit: Don't take this personally, I just dont think you can take someones word that they are good at their job without assessing their skills. Certainly if schools dont already have someone in position it is difficult to judge?
    Last edited by penfold; 20th July 2010 at 04:57 PM.

  16. #29
    linuxgirlie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Kent
    Posts
    340
    Thank Post
    106
    Thanked 33 Times in 18 Posts
    Rep Power
    32
    OK here are my views on this and I do work in a school and I am a Network Manager....before we get into all the you don't know what it's like cause your a teacher/work in the private sector malarkey:


    1. Don't buy any software.
    We do this here already, it works very well. For those saying what about when they work in businesses, there is nothing to worry about. We have had students come back from work experience who have had to input data via a console all day or others who say that using the OSS gave them a head start over others when going for jobs/university. I'm not saying that this is with all jobs, but sometimes, it helps a lot more than people let on.

    It also means when our yr6's and yr7's arrive we give them all the software for free on a disk in their school information pack.

    We have Linux on the clients and servers, and apart from our web-based software all of the client software is OSS.


    2. Make use of web-based applications.
    All our software has to be web-based if it isn't OSS. This has helped us a lot not just because it is very very easy to roll out onto a server or into moodle meaning that all computers, running Windows/Mac/Linux around the school can view and use it. No running around after individual computers, and low maintenance.

    We also have our own webserver here running, Elgg, Moodle, eGroupware, Squirrelmail, Joomla, Drupal, Home Access, and probably others I have forgotten.

    3. Don't bother replacing your computers.
    Most of ours are not that old, but we can afford to replace computers because we build our own from components and run them on Linux so no OS licenses, it also allows us to put in 22" TFTs and Nvidia Graphics cards by default, so that the lads can go anywhere in the school and use programs such as blender.

    4. Allow the pupils to use their own devices.
    I don't know why people have such a problem with this one. We allow all students to use whatever device on the network. They connect via our wireless or they can use a spare port on the wall. We have had mobiles, laptops, netbooks, psp, ipods you name it, and I have never had a problem with viruses, network being hacked or anything else in the past 6 years.


    5. Take control of your Internet connection.
    This is something we are looking into, at the moment we are still with KCN for our ISP, but we don't use their websense service, and provide our own squid/dansguardian proxy to stop access to websites.

    6. Don't buy, or subscribe, to any digital resources.
    This one I don't agree with 100% We get the staff to buy web-based resources so that they can be used throughout the school. The use of Moodle is on the up, but it does take alot of time for people to write their own resources.

    7. Don't pay for CPD.
    To my knowledge 99% of our CPD is done in house, we also have alot of old students or parents or friends who come in and do talks for free so this is n/a to us.

    8. Empower your people
    I see this happen here a lot. We have moved on from when it was Windows based having to run around all the time, we now have to do that very little, with just myself and my technician(part-time) supporting 400+ devices. We have found using OSS has allowed us to re-code, or provide solutions for staff that wouldn't of been possible within budget. We have also found alot of the students will recode, find bugs and generally help out as they can look into the software and fix it.

    9. Use volunteer support.
    Again this is a big one for us here. We use student support alot. They code for us, bug fix, tell us about any security holes, and also tell us what the students dislike about the system so we can make changes. They also help build computers and do general day-to-day tech support. We have had several students go though ICT degrees and tell us that helping out gave them the edge in the classes.

    10. Share your expertise and creativity.
    Very very important!

    -----

    Jo
    Last edited by linuxgirlie; 20th July 2010 at 04:58 PM.

  17. Thanks to linuxgirlie from:

    putt1ck (20th July 2010)

  18. #30

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    10
    Thank Post
    1
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Rep Power
    0
    @jamesb
    Particularly if you consider the costs of getting technical staff appropriately skilled up - which will be required. Except that one of the points suggests money is no longer wasted on such things. I guess replacing staff needs to be factored in, instead. Or extra pay and self-development time to skill themselves up, as well as bringing in others to cover time that staff are away. Will it? If your technical staff are skilled up to use open source, and properly configure it, do you not think there's a potential for them to be looking for a better paid position which will appreciate their skills more? And that the demand for people skilled in open-source will increase, meaning that the pay for such positions will have to increase to attract them?
    There are that many technical staff in schools who are not trying the emerging technologies? And they call themselves geeks? The term should be better protected...

    On the jobs front: a quick survey gets me no suggestion that equally skilled closed source/open source techs are getting paid different amounts, so either people are leaving and the pay rates are going up, or they're not. Schools tend to take the less experienced and then those driven by money/career tend to move on once they have up-skilled; some stay. Me I moved because of money/career/chance to live in the country (damn Man Utd footballers made living in the country in commuting distance of South Manchester too damn expensive...). Some stay. Some have chosen to take their experience into schools as a form of payback or as part of a winding down to retirement plan.

    I can see some very direct savings from open-source, but there are also added costs involved.
    Only in the transition, and with collaboration (word of the day!) those can be minimised.

    Great. So are you available for the working day of schools? Or are the staff at the school expected to sacrifice their time outside of work for this collaboration?
    What? You mean I should give my time up to help but those I'm aiming to help can't be expected to give up some of their time? I could probably schedule some day time for schools that were particularly local (North Oxfordshire, around Oxford) and would be willing commit days of my holiday to a group of schools who wanted to pursue this seriously.

    No disagreement here, but suggesting that this applies to all schools strikes me as being somewhat naive. A very good team, with a very good set of staff in the school, and the right number of volunteers with knowledge of the individual school as well as many other factors would be required.
    Sure, for the pioneers in a given area; the rest in that area could reproduce far more easily by drawing on the experienced pool from the pioneer. That damned collaboration word again



SHARE:
+ Post New Thread
Page 2 of 12 FirstFirst 123456 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Open Source Schools presentation now available
    By GrumbleDook in forum BETT 2015
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 6th January 2011, 12:32 PM
  2. open source schools
    By Face-Man in forum *nix
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 1st September 2009, 04:39 PM
  3. Open Source, Outsourcing and Schools
    By Dos_Box in forum IT News
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 6th March 2008, 09:34 AM
  4. Stockport schools take open-source route
    By CyberNerd in forum IT News
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 23rd March 2007, 07:48 PM
  5. Open source in schools
    By kevinmcaleer in forum General Chat
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 22nd December 2005, 09:52 PM

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •