+ Post New Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 23 of 23
Blue Skies Thread, Schools UNblocking Social Network Sites? in General; There's an article in Secondary Education that might be worth a read. Sec Ed 11th February 2010...
  1. #16
    fiendishlyclever's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Nottingham
    Posts
    169
    Thank Post
    26
    Thanked 28 Times in 25 Posts
    Rep Power
    16
    There's an article in Secondary Education that might be worth a read.

    Sec Ed 11th February 2010

  2. #17
    NewOrder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Stafford
    Posts
    195
    Thank Post
    10
    Thanked 18 Times in 17 Posts
    Rep Power
    18
    Today, Ofsted released their report based on an e-safety survey that they ran last year in 35 primary and secondary schools. .

    The report recommends the use of ‘managed’ systems instead of locked down systems. One of the key findings reads:

    “Pupils in the schools that had ‘managed’ systems had a better knowledge and understanding of how to stay safe than those in schools with ‘locked down’ systems. Pupils were more vulnerable overall when schools used locked down systems because they were not given enough opportunities to learn how to assess and manage risk for themselves.”

    One recommendation made reads:

    “The DCSF, in conjunction with Becta, CEOP and local authorities should…Encourage and support schools to move from locked down to managed systems.”

    Note that it says ‘encourage and support’ so while not mandatory it is recommended by Ofsted.

    Links

    BBC summary: BBC News - Pupils 'must manage online risks'

    Full report from Ofsted (I recommend you read it all)

    The safe use of new technologies / Thematic reports / Documents by type / Browse all by / Publications and research / Ofsted home / Ofsted - Ofsted


    I also like this where a school through fire got up and running through the use of facebook.



    The school they couldn't kill ? 'We are Campsmount'

  3. Thanks to NewOrder from:

    mb2k01 (11th February 2010)

  4. #18
    mb2k01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,111
    Thank Post
    189
    Thanked 223 Times in 190 Posts
    Rep Power
    90
    Just to give a bit more background as most replies have been kindly detailed...

    We are considering changing our (largely inheritted) approach to filtering of Social Networking Sites, and were/are interested to hear from others having taken similar paths.

    I would rate my personal opinion as somewhere between neutral and positive.
    I can see the sense in considering unblocking, as education isn't gained from preventing experience.
    It also makes no sense that while we block access so tightly at school, we all largely accept that the majority of students go straight home and use the sites - largely safely and sensibly.
    Having controlled access in school at appropriate times would allow for education and an element of monitoring, as well as a cultivation of more mature use of what could be a useful resource.

    Going that way would obviously bring challenges, but only time would tell if the rewards were worth the effort.

    [edit - thanks to the previous two posters and your links - both demonstrating similar thinking and highlighting positive reports]
    Last edited by mb2k01; 11th February 2010 at 09:38 PM.

  5. #19

    AngryTechnician's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    3,724
    Thank Post
    696
    Thanked 1,206 Times in 759 Posts
    Rep Power
    393
    At my last school (secondary level), Facebook had never been blocked. I was there when Facebook membership was opened up and its use started to become prevalent. The decision was taken that the school would rather monitor and educate than block. This stance is now being borne out by the recent Ofsted talk about managing online risks rather than locking everything down.

    In my own experience, our 'watch-and-learn' culture meant we were able to log and catch several instances of cyber-bullying that would still otherwise have occurred in the same medium, but out of school hours where we would never have caught it. It's not a reason to unblock on it's own, but it's worth thinking about.

  6. Thanks to AngryTechnician from:

    mb2k01 (12th February 2010)

  7. #20
    limbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Birmingham
    Posts
    460
    Thank Post
    2
    Thanked 41 Times in 36 Posts
    Rep Power
    24
    We have written a basic social networking element into our VLE. All externally hosted ones are blocked by the LEA.

  8. #21
    NewOrder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Stafford
    Posts
    195
    Thank Post
    10
    Thanked 18 Times in 17 Posts
    Rep Power
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by limbo View Post
    We have written a basic social networking element into our VLE. All externally hosted ones are blocked by the LEA.
    That may change when they read the reports but I doubt. Most schools are happy it is easier to block than manage and monitor.

  9. #22
    flyinghaggis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    931
    Thank Post
    93
    Thanked 64 Times in 52 Posts
    Rep Power
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by mb2k01 View Post
    I can see the sense in considering unblocking, as education isn't gained from preventing experience.
    It also makes no sense that while we block access so tightly at school, we all largely accept that the majority of students go straight home and use the sites - largely safely and sensibly.
    Having controlled access in school at appropriate times would allow for education and an element of monitoring, as well as a cultivation of more mature use of what could be a useful resource.
    I think the fundamental problem is one of control.

    At the end of the day you as a school have no control over what is posted and what materials the pupils/staff are subjected to by themselves or others on the website so I'd see it as largely irresponsible to allow pupils to use the sites. You cant really supervise what's going on and the 'what if...' scenarios would put legal responsibility of anything that happens as a result of you encouraging them to use it right at the schools door.

    Far better to have an internal VLE style social network IMO where you can control/view all content to keep the pupils safe. You dont need to let pupils put themselves at risk to teach them about the dangers of the internet and social networking.
    Last edited by flyinghaggis; 15th February 2010 at 09:30 AM.

  10. Thanks to flyinghaggis from:

    mb2k01 (15th February 2010)

  11. #23
    mb2k01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,111
    Thank Post
    189
    Thanked 223 Times in 190 Posts
    Rep Power
    90
    Quote Originally Posted by flyinghaggis View Post
    I think the fundamental problem is one of control.

    At the end of the day you as a school have no control over what is posted and what materials the pupils/staff are subjected to by themselves or others on the website so I'd see it as largely irresponsible to allow pupils to use the sites. You cant really supervise what's going on and the 'what if...' scenarios would put legal responsibility of anything that happens as a result of you encouraging them to use it right at the schools door.

    Far better to have an internal VLE style social network IMO where you can control/view all content to keep the pupils safe. You dont need to let pupils put themselves at risk to teach them about the dangers of the internet and social networking.
    As I said in my original post, I remain fairly neutral on the idea, and agree with some of what you've said, but there is a flip side as well.

    Currently a school who blocks access to a social network has no control, no supervision and no say in how it is used. If a pupil runs in to difficulty it will largely go un-noticed and unreported.
    If controlled access was available in school then an element of monitoring, education and advice can take place. With technologies like Smoothwall and Securis (for example), schools can be confident that while access is enabled, pupils remain protected.

    I would argue that a "what if" scenario was much LESS likely to happen in the above scenario - and if one did, the school would be best placed to action some form of intervention.

SHARE:
+ Post New Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. [Video] How to Help Social Network Addicts
    By mattx in forum Jokes/Interweb Things
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 1st February 2010, 01:07 PM
  2. Schools using Social Networking
    By imgonna in forum Virtual Learning Platforms
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2nd October 2009, 08:44 PM
  3. AUP Social networking sites
    By chrbb in forum School ICT Policies
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 18th May 2009, 05:29 PM
  4. proxy sites in schools
    By Millsy79 in forum Network and Classroom Management
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 25th January 2008, 03:24 PM

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •