Blog Comments

  1. TheScarfedOne's Avatar
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    Ah - if you had a previous version of the solution on your environment - you would end up with an assembly version mis-match to what is registered as safe in your web.config. Remember - that your web.config reflects the internal unique identifier in the assembly dll. This does change between versions.

    With a copy of the webpart already on a page - you would therefore get this error as the webpart on the page (old version) would not match the assembly.

    Glad you are all sorted - sorry I didnt see the problem sooner to save you some head scratching.
  2. Swarve's Avatar
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    Finally got it working after removing all instances of Sharepoint Forums, then continuing from step 2 above - don't know what happened, but it seemed to work in the end. Thanks for posting this solution, it's been invaluable!

    Swarve
  3. Swarve's Avatar
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    That's awesome - I've been banging my head up against a wall trying to get this installed for the last couple of days. Just one problem - when I attempt to add the web part, I get the error "Unable to add selected web part(s). Sharepoint Forums 1.2.0.0: The located assembly's manifest definition does not match the assembly reference. (Exception from HRESULT:0x80131040).

    Any idea what this means and how I can resolve it?

    Thanks in advance,

    Swarve
    Updated 25th May 2009 at 02:46 AM by Swarve
  4. localzuk's Avatar
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    Hmmm... So NetBSD doesn't go for 'ease of use' then
  5. powdarrmonkey's Avatar
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    Strictly speaking, apt is only the package system on Debian-type distributions. Redhat has rpm, gentoo has portage, etc.
  6. unseen's Avatar
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    Cheers Stuart much appreciated. It's gained quite a lot of momentum at work as the "wrong" people have seen the "Ease of control" and other similar blurbs being pushed out by MS. Good to know it's not all hot air!! We've been a Symantec house for a long long time now.. (think it's coming up to 9yrs now!) But I have to admit I DO NOT like endpoint (v11) and when I trialed the server components it was the worst hog I've seen in a long time as it's now Java based yuck!.. Ho hum change is good (I hope!)
  7. TheScarfedOne's Avatar
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    I will check the logs for you and see if I can find something BIG!! LOL. I dont think there has been anything major. Easy to manage tho, and v2 looks like it will be really good too.
  8. unseen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stuartwilkie
    Hi there... late response I know but here we go!

    1. Cleanup rates... well i get emails from it periodically telling em when it has found a "threat" and dealt with it. The usual .js ones so far and all dealt with.

    2. Deployment. We used to have AVG, thankfully a quick google showed up that Kaspersky had an AVG removal tool. It does what it says on the tin - silently removes AVG. Used that and pushed Forefront at the same time using WSUS. You can use GPSI though.
    Thanks for that Stuart, I'm actually NHS based IT (unfortunately no equivalent of EduGeek for us! ) but I've got to look at forefront due to NHS licensing. Have you had it find any real nastys yet? Or any reports of it not finding stuff?

    Rob
  9. EduTech's Avatar
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    I can also confirm this works perfect much easier this way. and took minutes to install and nothing can get broken.

    Looks much better than the normal "discussion boards"
  10. EduTech's Avatar
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    1. Install WSS3 and MOSS2007 SP2:
    This could be fun! Let hope it dont break any of my highly customised environment!

    I'm sure we will both find that out!! as it is on my list as well oh the joy!
  11. TheScarfedOne's Avatar
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    Hi there... late response I know but here we go!

    1. Cleanup rates... well i get emails from it periodically telling em when it has found a "threat" and dealt with it. The usual .js ones so far and all dealt with.

    2. Deployment. We used to have AVG, thankfully a quick google showed up that Kaspersky had an AVG removal tool. It does what it says on the tin - silently removes AVG. Used that and pushed Forefront at the same time using WSUS. You can use GPSI though.
  12. p858snake's Avatar
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    But come the summer and this software can be installed ready to upset the little blighter in September. I'm actually half way through my £6000 consumables budget in just 2 months! Admittedly £400 was for this software
    But if you use the release stations in large commons areas such as the library you should save some because people actually have to go up and approve the job so people dosn't get wasted by accidently clicks and walk offs.
  13. BrianG's Avatar
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    You're right, I'd much rather put the 12K to good use and buy hardware and software that is going to be of more use, than hand it over to microsoft for Office. Open office is the way to go !

    I can understand, from the teachers point of view, they haven't had a techie for months and they find administering things using winsuite to be quite easy and agreeable but from a technical point of view it's a complete nightmare. I will be trying my best to get rid of it
  14. browolf's Avatar
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    you didn't, but if you want the respect of intellectuals you've got to at least pretend to be ;-)
  15. tmcd35's Avatar
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    Firstly Brian - Take a base ball bat and gently apply it to your heads head until he caves in and agrees how bad WinSuite is. Seriously, convince him that you need to move to Win7 ASAP to stay up with modern tech. Then, as an after thought, mention WinSuite is not Win7 compatible. Whatever you do, get rid of it!!!

    As for OpenOffice. To upgrade all machines to the current version of M$ Office would cost us £12k. Thankfully M$ only release new version every 3 years and we can skip versions. So £12k every 6 years. The problem is £12k is a computer suite! I'd rather replace old hardware than waist £12k on a piece of software we don't really need, do we?
  16. BrianG's Avatar
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    There is a very strong argument for using OpenOffice in schools. Unlike shifting the entire OS onto open source, which would scare most teaching staff to death, Openoffice, for the end user and not to technically minded, is very very similar to Office. It offers much of the same options and facilities and because you can save to an Office format there should be no compatability issues.

    How much a year would it save you? not having to go down the office route?
  17. BrianG's Avatar
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    I would dearly love to get rid of Winsuite at one of my schools but unfortunately the head teacher thinks it's brilliant. I hate it with a passion.
  18. localzuk's Avatar
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    A Select Agreement is a perpetual license. ie. You buy once, and that's it. Although, you can add Software Assurance (ie. the ability to update to new versions) to your select agreement, for a price.

    A Schools Agreement is a yearly subscription, based on the total number of machines in your school. Even if you only use the software on half of them, you still pay for them all.
  19. Edu-IT's Avatar
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    What would be the difference between a Schools Agreement and a Select Agreement?
  20. localzuk's Avatar
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    The word here is 'vendor lock-in'. This is a term used throughout the world when discussing Microsoft. ie. they have worked actively over the last decade, using their position to force people to stay with what they produce - and leveraged that position to force their way into other markets (media players, web browsers). They have also been seen to be using tactics to prevent companies from using other OS's - ie OEM contracts that prevent companies from using other OS's. (Similar to the way Intel has just been fined for offering incentives for only using Intel chips).

    So, what we end up with is a situation where we have schools and businesses who are using their software due to earlier nefarious activity. And the users within those organisations are now so tied into it, they are reluctant to change, regardless of the benefits of other software.

    It'd be like getting someone to change the place they live, even if they were provided with a house which was twice the size, and half the price. People get used to something and don't like to change.